Happy Atheist Forum

telepathy using cell phones

jcm

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telepathy using cell phones
« on: December 14, 2007, 03:19:42 AM »
What do you think about telepathy? Do you think that is possible in the near future? I have noticed how the cell phone has gotten smaller and smaller. I know many of you have seen bluetooth headsets all over the place. People are real dorks, "yeah, showin' off the head set, check me out...I've got important stuff goin' on… too busy to use the hands in public" But anyway :), as technology gets smaller and more advanced, do you think we will one day create a communication device that interfaces with the brain? If signals from the brain can be converted and passed from one device to another with nothing more than a thought, is that not telepathy? I wonder how that would change the world and if it is possible. If it is possible, I am sure it will be a world unlike anyone has every imagined.
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by jcm »
For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring. -cs

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« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2007, 03:19:00 PM »
Have you ever owned a computer that didn't crash at some time or another?  Not so savy on the idea of having something like that attached to my cerebral "CPU".
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by ryanvc76 »
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SteveS

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« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2007, 04:43:30 PM »
A lot of sci-fi authors imagine a future like this.  People can call up information from a sort of super-Internet right in their mind, and see it in "virtual vision" or some such.

I always thought it sounded cool, and I've frequently wished I could add memory to my brain.....
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by SteveS »

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« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2007, 07:00:02 PM »
Make college easy lol.

Yeah I wouldnt particularly like it---it better have good default setting for crash-resistance haha.

Also hacking could be a potential prob. If some memory enhancement did come into play, there would have to be a shitload of governmental restrictions. You think they will let you just pop in a disc and know all there is to know about nukes? HAH! It would probably just make the world more complicated. Hell they probobably wouldnt eve let you learn how to use guns. Of course it would all depend on the constraits on the memory and how it works with the brain.

Whoops--tangent.
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Big Mac

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« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2008, 05:11:35 PM »
No thanks, I prefer what mother nature has given me. It's not fool-proof but it's free and so far works fine!
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Big Mac »
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Julia

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« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2008, 06:45:56 PM »
Quote from: "Steve S"
People can call up information from a sort of super-Internet right in their mind, and see it in "virtual vision" or some such.


Internet in the mind? Sounds like a wet dream for purveyors of net-porn, Viagra and dodgy stock tips... :)
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Julia »

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« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2008, 06:17:34 PM »
Quote from: "SteveS"
A lot of sci-fi authors imagine a future like this.  People can call up information from a sort of super-Internet right in their mind, and see it in "virtual vision" or some such.

I always thought it sounded cool, and I've frequently wished I could add memory to my brain.....


never gonna happen, I just saw a movie with silvester stallone, I don't remember the name but he was frozen for 36 years and it was like 400 years worth of technological advance... stupid writer....
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Ezequiel Medvietzky »

LARA

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« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2008, 09:57:56 PM »
jcm you might check out Ray Kurzweil's stuff if you haven't already.  He has all kinds of rather interesting ideas and links on his site.  You also could google Transhumanism, they're really into the body-as-hardware sort of thing.

As far as reality goes, I think it would be easier to manufacture a device to implant in the brain than to get the brain to accept it.  There are a lot of histocompatibility issues with many materials and these might not be suitable for electronics construction.  You would have to cover the device with a material the brains immune cells wouldn't attack and then the interface could still be a problem since it would have to pass through to connect to the neurons.  Plus, what if it breaks?  Even fairly simple things like hip replacements break over time, but usually they are implanted in the elderly so they last long enough.  And imagine the insurance suits and malpractice that could come into play with these devices.

I think it really could be possible to do this, but it wouldn't end up being that much cooler than what we have now for a greater cost in terms of health problems, etc.  We may just get our devices smaller and more wearable and have something like a contact lens interface that responds to eye movement rather than getting into the greasy grey matter and potentially messing something up.

The first implant I heard of related to electronics was a small magnet placed under the skin of a finger.  It vibrates when passed over electrical sources kind of giving the user a sixth sense.  People doing this didn't always tolerate the metals involved.

Maybe someday instead of using current things like microchips, we could use bioengineering to add to human senses things like a pigeon's tracking ability.

Damn, I wrote you an essay.  :)
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by LARA »
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Janga

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« Reply #8 on: February 21, 2008, 04:53:50 AM »
In the words of Joe Rogan: "Isn't language a form of telepathy? I'm making sounds with my mouth and you're reading my mind!"

Come to think of it, isn't communicating on a message board like this a form of telepathy? You know exactly what I'm thinking about right now, which is what I'm writing right now.
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Janga »

SteveS

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« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2008, 07:57:50 PM »
Quote from: "LARA"
Maybe someday instead of using current things like microchips, we could use bioengineering to add to human senses things like a pigeon's tracking ability.

That would be cool - never get lost again.  Just please, for humanity's sake, don't give anyone the sense of smell that dogs possess.  That would gross everyone out for sure!
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by SteveS »

jcm

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« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2008, 02:26:28 AM »
LARA
Thanks, I'll check his site out.

It would be interesting to see a world that was connected through the mind. What's the answer? Well just ask someone who knows by thinking about it. What a incredible internet, huh? Just make sure you have a really good spam filter!

Quote
Maybe someday instead of using current things like microchips, we could use bioengineering to add to human senses things like a pigeon's tracking ability.

Yeah I'd like to always know which direction is north
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by jcm »
For me, it is far better to grasp the Universe as it really is than to persist in delusion, however satisfying and reassuring. -cs

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« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2008, 08:19:48 PM »
William Gibson's books are chock full of this sort of thing (he's the father of cyberpunk science fiction).  I can't remember if it was "Pattern Recognition" or perhaps Neal Stephenson's "Snow Crash."  I'm thinking it's the latter actually, that explores computer viruses, biological viruses, and possible connections.  It's a lot more complex than that, of course, but it's been a long time since I've read it.  

It is a fascinating subject.  Hopefully, we'll grow up more as a species before we get too deep into this stuff.
« Last Edit: January 01, 1970, 01:00:00 AM by Sophie »
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Re:
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2008, 02:11:46 AM »
I don't really like the idea. I'd probably go to sleep forgetting I had the thing on and accidentally call China.  :crazy:

Quote from: "Ezequiel Medvietzky"
Quote from: "SteveS"
A lot of sci-fi authors imagine a future like this.  People can call up information from a sort of super-Internet right in their mind, and see it in "virtual vision" or some such.

I always thought it sounded cool, and I've frequently wished I could add memory to my brain.....

never gonna happen, I just saw a movie with silvester stallone, I don't remember the name but he was frozen for 36 years and it was like 400 years worth of technological advance... stupid writer....
Was it Demolition Man? :D

Tom62

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Re: telepathy using cell phones
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2008, 09:51:03 AM »
I don't like the idea either. The idea that someone would be talking directly into your brain, would drive me nuts. I'll stick to my cell phone. The nice things about cell phone is that you can 1. switch them off and 2. "accidentally" forget to take them with you.
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curiosityandthecat

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Re:
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2008, 04:03:59 PM »
Quote from: "Sophie"
William Gibson's books are chock full of this sort of thing (he's the father of cyberpunk science fiction).  I can't remember if it was "Pattern Recognition" or perhaps Neal Stephenson's "Snow Crash."  I'm thinking it's the latter actually, that explores computer viruses, biological viruses, and possible connections.  It's a lot more complex than that, of course, but it's been a long time since I've read it.  

It is a fascinating subject.  Hopefully, we'll grow up more as a species before we get too deep into this stuff.

Yeah, that was Snow Crash. One of my favorite books. It really is very interesting stuff. Also, his book The Diamond Age; or, A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer explores the uses of nanomachines (both good and bad). Awesome stuff.
-Curio