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A Word for the Day

Dark Lightning

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #45 on: September 06, 2018, 08:25:06 PM »
I've tried to find this translation. Where did you get it? I think it's funny as hell, but can't find the translation.

It showed up on my FB feed.

Quote
The etymology of Cerberus' name is uncertain. Ogden[136] refers to attempts to establish an Indo-European etymology as "not yet successful". It has been claimed to be related to the Sanskrit word सर्वरा sarvarā, used as an epithet of one of the dogs of Yama, from a Proto-Indo-European word *k̑érberos, meaning "spotted".[137] Lincoln (1991),[138] among others, critiques this etymology. Lincoln notes a similarity between Cerberus and the Norse mythological dog Garmr, relating both names to a Proto-Indo-European root *ger- "to growl" (perhaps with the suffixes -*m/*b and -*r). However, as Ogden observes, this analysis actually requires Kerberos and Garmr to be derived from two different Indo-European roots (*ker- and *gher- respectively), and so does not actually establish a relationship between the two names.

Though probably not Greek, Greek etymologies for Cerberus have been offered. An etymology given by Servius (the late-fourth-century commentator on Virgil)—but rejected by Ogden—derives Cerberus from the Greek word creoboros meaning "flesh-devouring".[139] Another suggested etymology derives Cerberus from "Ker berethrou", meaning "evil of the pit".[140]

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerberus

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Cerberus

Apparently, the origin of Cerebrus' name is not at all certain. It would be funny as hell if it were 'Spot' or 'Spotted', though!

Thanks for the info! Yes, "Spot" would be pretty amusing.  :D
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #46 on: September 19, 2018, 12:55:00 AM »
I lose myself infused in something more than what they've seen
I'm not a slave to greed
I don't embrace your make believe
I've never been for sale no matter what they think I need



Dave

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #47 on: September 19, 2018, 08:37:03 AM »


That's one of my favourites! Have used it to show how a normally 'silent', in English pronounciation at least, letter gets pronounced when its word is in a combination.

Those who converted Greek pronounciation for use by other languages, and left us with many 'silent' letters, can either be cursed or praised depending on how you view language, as a subject of mere learning or intense interest!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #48 on: October 21, 2019, 12:05:15 AM »


It's what I do...when I'm alone. :deadpan:

:P
I lose myself infused in something more than what they've seen
I'm not a slave to greed
I don't embrace your make believe
I've never been for sale no matter what they think I need



Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #49 on: October 21, 2019, 05:14:55 AM »


Well! . . .Shit and fall back in it! I've  posted in the rung thread. Sorry! :chairhide:
« Last Edit: October 21, 2019, 05:25:26 AM by Red_Cloud »

hermes2015

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #50 on: October 21, 2019, 05:18:41 AM »


It's what I do...when I'm alone. :deadpan:

:P

You're too modest; I am sure you actually look like this.

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xSilverPhinx

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #51 on: October 22, 2019, 04:05:49 AM »


It's what I do...when I'm alone. :deadpan:

:P

You're too modest; I am sure you actually look like this.



She looks graceful. :tellmemore:

*enters envious mode*

But in that pic looks like she's tripping on air.

*leaves envious mode*

Still graceful, though. :tellmemore:
I lose myself infused in something more than what they've seen
I'm not a slave to greed
I don't embrace your make believe
I've never been for sale no matter what they think I need



Recusant

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #52 on: May 17, 2020, 09:51:17 PM »
poliorcetics noun  \ˌpȯl-ē-ȯr-ˈset-iks\ (Post-classical Latin poliorcetica siege engines, from Ancient Greek πολιορκητικά poliorkētiká, “things related to sieges”)

: the art of siege warfare, namely, that of conducting or resisting a siege

pol·i·or·cet·ic adjective  : of or related to sieges

In the excerpt below, the army that marched south from Lyons to Béziers at the beginning of the Albigensian Crusade is being described. The attack on Béziers lead to one of the massacres of the war during which the infamous line "Caedite eos. Novit enim Dominus qui sunt eius." ("Kill them. For the Lord knows those that are His own.") was said to have been uttered by the Papal legate Arnaud Amalric. This in response to a question of how to determine which citizens of the place were heretics and which were not, and therefore who should be spared.

Quote
Such an army [between 20,000 and 30,000] required impressive logistical support. Camp followers included priests, cooks, victualling masters, tradesmen supplying food and wine, blacksmiths, carpenters, wagoners and mule drivers, often under the instruction of quartermasters. Again, this number would fluctuate as the army progressed through villages and towns, where further food and supplies could be requisitioned. Of course, many were expected to turn their hand to a whole range of practical roles. In the most powerful contingents were specialist engineers to operate the siege machinery and direct miners to sap the walls of the enemy. These formed an essential branch of any campaigning army. Philip of France's success at war owed much to his skill in poliorcetics (siegecraft). He was known to take his engineers everywhere and they proved their worth time and again.

— Sean McGlynn Kill Them All: Cathars and Carnage in the Albigensian Crusade (2015)


From the Chroniques de Saint-Denis. On the left, Pope Innocent III excommunicates the Cathars. On the right, the men of the pope kill Cathars.
"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
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Icarus

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #53 on: May 23, 2020, 12:25:36 AM »
^ hooray for engineers.  f=Ma and all that other good stuff they know about projectile launchers, re-curved bows, battering rams, pontoon  bridges, and  such.

My word for the day is: so.  It is a perfectly well understood word but it has come into widespread use in a puzzling way.  I listen to NPR radio programs and there are lots of interviews with impressively educated people.  Why then do so many of them begin their sentences with the subjectively meaningless word SO??   I have also noticed politicians and salespeople using that prefix for a reply.  For example: What day is it?  reply; "so it is friday"   So it is a day in May. ....etc. 

Not long ago the operative word, especially among teenagers was "Like" . That one has faded somewhat and is now replaced with other verbal quirks that defy understanding. An amazing array of people use the tern "you know" as a filler for a verbal pause. 

Alright I know that I am being a picky bastard.  Just the same,  my high school English teacher would have rapped my knuckles with a ruler for such  verbal or written language litter.

Randy

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Re: A Word for the Day
« Reply #54 on: May 23, 2020, 12:55:06 AM »
^ hooray for engineers.  f=Ma and all that other good stuff they know about projectile launchers, re-curved bows, battering rams, pontoon  bridges, and  such.

My word for the day is: so.  It is a perfectly well understood word but it has come into widespread use in a puzzling way.  I listen to NPR radio programs and there are lots of interviews with impressively educated people.  Why then do so many of them begin their sentences with the subjectively meaningless word SO??   I have also noticed politicians and salespeople using that prefix for a reply.  For example: What day is it?  reply; "so it is friday"   So it is a day in May. ....etc. 

Not long ago the operative word, especially among teenagers was "Like" . That one has faded somewhat and is now replaced with other verbal quirks that defy understanding. An amazing array of people use the tern "you know" as a filler for a verbal pause. 

Alright I know that I am being a picky bastard.  Just the same,  my high school English teacher would have rapped my knuckles with a ruler for such  verbal or written language litter.

I used to tell my daughter what "like" meant. She knew of course but kept using it incorrectly. Now she's 35 and she's having to watch herself. She's a project leader with eleven employees beneath her. She doesn't want to sound like the teenager she once was.
"Maybe it's just a bunch of stuff that happens." -- Homer Simpson