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General => Miscellaneous => Topic started by: Dave on July 10, 2017, 07:26:50 PM

Title: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 10, 2017, 07:26:50 PM
A place for seeking practical advice, offering tips and ideas or blowing one's own Mr or Ms Fixit trumpet!



Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 11, 2017, 07:35:51 AM
Moved ftom "Grumpy" topic.

Should be easy to take 1mm off as a flat. But dare I try to "turn" them down using a file and the drill in its horizontal stand, with wood either side to limit and level the cut? 0.5mm accuracy is all I really need, providing that gives a little slack rather than stopping the saw base fitting.

That really depends on the type of drill you have. If it's just a Jacobs taper like a drill press I wouldnt try it. The lateral forces on the chuck would knock it out rather quickly. Just about every homemade "milling" machine winds up the same way - with the chuck and endmill lying on the floor and the creator wondering what happened!

If there's a left hand threaded retention screw that acts almost like a drawbar though... might work. Runout would be pretty bad though and you might not wind up with a very round washer at the end.
Bog standard hand drill with a 43mm collar - as I said, no heavy kit and everything multi-purpose! The, "Bolt them together and file a flat" option is top of the option list at the moment.

Why, for some, is making the "tools" more of an attraction than making anything "non-tool" with them? I desperately need a folding stool in the workshop, should really make that first!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on July 11, 2017, 03:39:44 PM
Two days ago, I replaced on ceiling light with a ceiling fan. The fuckers that installed the light fucked up the ceiling so I had to patch it first.

That same day I replaced two other ceiling fans and one of them, the house mounting was jury rigged and broken so that it worked with a bent ceiling fan mount, so I had to fix it before installing the new one.

Then last night, I replaced another with no problems.

I have one more to replace, and I'm worried about what I'll find when I remove the old one.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 11, 2017, 04:25:56 PM
Two days ago, I replaced on ceiling light with a ceiling fan. The fuckers that installed the light fucked up the ceiling so I had to patch it first.

That same day I replaced two other ceiling fans and one of them, the house mounting was jury rigged and broken so that it worked with a bent ceiling fan mount, so I had to fix it before installing the new one.

Then last night, I replaced another with no problems.

I have one more to replace, and I'm worried about what I'll find when I remove the old one.

In the UK we call bad workmen "cowboys", is it the same over there in the land of the Wild West? I had to beef up my mounting point when I installed my fan but only because of the change of weight. I like to be sure, I sit under it!

It's now illegal to DIY electrical work here unless you get it inspected by a "Part P" (part of the IEEE regs) qualified electrician - for a large fee. But no-one is going to notice changed or replaced wall lights, switches or outlets are they? Or even a changed ceiling fan, the certificate notes a fan is present and has been tested, but not the make or model . . .
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on July 11, 2017, 04:34:04 PM
In the UK we call bad workmen "cowboys", is it the same over there in the land of the Wild West?
We call them by their scientifically accurate, and universal Latin name - "Idiots"

Quote
It's now illegal to DIY electrical work here unless you get it inspected by a "Part P" (part of the IEEE regs) qualified electrician - for a large fee. But no-one is going to notice changed or replaced wall lights, switches or outlets are they?


Nope!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on July 11, 2017, 05:56:35 PM
I don't think much is illegal, but there are a lot of things require permits and licensed contractors if you want to be able to sell or get full value.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 11, 2017, 09:57:24 PM
Moved ftom "Grumpy" topic.

Should be easy to take 1mm off as a flat. But dare I try to "turn" them down using a file and the drill in its horizontal stand, with wood either side to limit and level the cut? 0.5mm accuracy is all I really need, providing that gives a little slack rather than stopping the saw base fitting.

That really depends on the type of drill you have. If it's just a Jacobs taper like a drill press I wouldnt try it. The lateral forces on the chuck would knock it out rather quickly. Just about every homemade "milling" machine winds up the same way - with the chuck and endmill lying on the floor and the creator wondering what happened!

If there's a left hand threaded retention screw that acts almost like a drawbar though... might work. Runout would be pretty bad though and you might not wind up with a very round washer at the end.
Bog standard hand drill with a 43mm collar - as I said, no heavy kit and everything multi-purpose! The, "Bolt them together and file a flat" option is top of the option list at the moment.

Why, for some, is making the "tools" more of an attraction than making anything "non-tool" with them? I desperately need a folding stool in the workshop, should really make that first!

Nah, just get you a mini mill/lathe combo. They don't take up much space and almost function correctly... in all seriousness, I think bench work with a file might be your best bet unless you just feel like trying it to see. I've been known to do that myself; it's how I discovered that a rasp functions a poorly AR a lathe tool, especially when your lathe is a hammer drill clamped in a vise.

As for making tools, I like to think of it as increasing my capabilities. You can only do so much with what you have so long as you let what you have limit what you can do. Currently in the hunt for old washing machine motors for various reasons. A carbide grinder and proper 2 by 72 belt grinder top the list.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 11, 2017, 10:00:31 PM
I don't think much is illegal, but there are a lot of things require permits and licensed contractors if you want to be able to sell or get full value.

Doing the work isn't generally illegal so long as you follow code but there are plenty of people who do things for themselves that are very dangerous and illegal. Tying into old knob and tube electrical service is a great example. You can have knob and tube in your home, so long as you don't touch it. As soon as you add another outlet or switch though it should all be removed and replaced with modern wiring.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 12, 2017, 09:39:37 AM
Jj said:
Quote
As for making tools, I like to think of it as increasing my capabilities.

Yeah, to make even more tools!

 :grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on July 12, 2017, 05:42:48 PM
I don't think much is illegal, but there are a lot of things require permits and licensed contractors if you want to be able to sell or get full value.

Doing the work isn't generally illegal so long as you follow code but there are plenty of people who do things for themselves that are very dangerous and illegal. Tying into old knob and tube electrical service is a great example. You can have knob and tube in your home, so long as you don't touch it. As soon as you add another outlet or switch though it should all be removed and replaced with modern wiring.
Yeah, that's why I said not much is illegal, because some things are.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 14, 2017, 01:08:24 PM
I made a fundamental mistake but fudged it right!

After checking how big I could have my new worktop, and still get round it, I decided a standard 4ft x 4ft half sheet trimmed to 1m on one side woukd do. What I forgot to check was the diagonal of the hatch into the loft . . . It is 980mm!

But . . . I put a frame inside the original hole so that I could drop in a flush board from the top to stop me falling through the hole. Cutting 20mm off the corner joints of that frame, to leave a gap, gives me a diagonal of 1010mm. And no significant weakening of the frame.

Fit!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 16, 2017, 04:19:13 PM

Here's a tool maker for you Gloucester. Personally, I think he should've lapped the first one and used that to file the rest. For the sake of authenticity...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 16, 2017, 04:23:30 PM
As for my next project, it's going to be a shed door. The trick is I don't have a truck to bring large pieces of lumber in so I'm going to have to get creative. Dare I attempt a japanese scarf joint or do I just scab two by lumber together? The plan is for a torsion box frame with a thin skin glued on to give some rigidity. Maybe a few pieces on 1/4" plywood to keep the weight down so the door doesn't sag. I despise sagging barn doors.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 16, 2017, 04:45:26 PM

Here's a tool maker for you Gloucester. Personally, I think he should've lapped the first one and used that to file the rest. For the sake of authenticity...

I have always marvelled at the skills shown by early engineers, before template-programmed cutting machines were developed. Would love to see the techniques John Harrison and his forebears and contemporaries used. I would never have that dedication nor patience but I have a lot of respect for them.

But, the intellectual leaps that made those machines possible put even those hand-skills into the shadows in terms of human acheivement.

I would have lapped a master reference surface as well, to kerp a check on consistency, plus various gauges to check angle quality. But a master tool maker will get a set right, they were hardly into mass production then.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 16, 2017, 05:18:14 PM
Sooner or later we all have to go through the incandescent-to-LED lamp conversions at home. Well, there is another conversion road I've been walking the last few months. All my doors and wooden trim at home were originally painted with a white solvent-based polyurethane gel paint formulation. I decided to bite the bullet and repaint everything with the water-based polyurethane equivalent, since brushes and rollers are just washed in warm soapy water. I tested the paint first for durability and found it to be very tough and scratch resistant after a few days.

The process involves using fine sandpaper to key the old paint surfaces before applying one coat of an alkyd universal undercoat that gives a very nice matte finish. This gives a very good surface for the new paint. Then, when painting with the water-based paint, any splatters are just cleaned up with a wet cloth before it dries, and cleaning up is a dream. It means a bit of extra work now, but I think I will see a big benefit whenever I have to repaint.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 16, 2017, 05:35:51 PM
I've had success using Scotch Brite to rough up a surface for paint. Spray paint in my case but it worked very well and was cheaper than sandpaper. Just rinse it well when it loads up and you're good to go again for a while. It does wear down eventually but lasts a long while. I'm nearly addicted to the red pads.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 16, 2017, 05:36:04 PM
Sooner or later we all have to go through the incandescent-to-LED lamp conversions at home. Well, there is another conversion road I've been walking the last few months. All my doors and wooden trim at home were originally painted with a white solvent-based polyurethane gel paint formulation. I decided to bite the bullet and repaint everything with the water-based polyurethane equivalent, since brushes and rollers are just washed in warm soapy water. I tested the paint first for durability and found it to be very tough and scratch resistant after a few days.

The process involves using fine sandpaper to key the old paint surfaces before applying one coat of an alkyd universal undercoat that gives a very nice matte finish. This gives a very good surface for the new paint. Then, when painting with the water-based paint, any splatters are just cleaned up with a wet cloth before it dries, and cleaning up is a dream. It means a bit of extra work now, but I think I will see a big benefit whenever I have to repaint.

And no significant smells! The water based paint we used on the front door seems to have eirked well. But it was so hot that the undercoat was touch dry within about three mihutes - my pet jumping spiders were all over it before I had finnished the section, and they did not get stuck nor left any foot-prints.

The only thing is if it dries so fast brush marks do not have a chance to smooth out, needs good quality brushes. However, the plastic haired ones from a discount store seem to work very well, the first time. No matter how carefully you wash them they do not seem to work do well after that.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 16, 2017, 05:44:06 PM
I've had success using Scotch Brite to rough up a surface for paint. Spray paint in my case but it worked very well and was cheaper than sandpaper. Just rinse it well when it loads up and you're good to go again for a while. It does wear down eventually but lasts a long while. I'm nearly addicted to the red pads.

I have never used Scotch Brite, but thanks for the tip. I will get some and try them next time.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 16, 2017, 05:46:37 PM
Sooner or later we all have to go through the incandescent-to-LED lamp conversions at home. Well, there is another conversion road I've been walking the last few months. All my doors and wooden trim at home were originally painted with a white solvent-based polyurethane gel paint formulation. I decided to bite the bullet and repaint everything with the water-based polyurethane equivalent, since brushes and rollers are just washed in warm soapy water. I tested the paint first for durability and found it to be very tough and scratch resistant after a few days.

The process involves using fine sandpaper to key the old paint surfaces before applying one coat of an alkyd universal undercoat that gives a very nice matte finish. This gives a very good surface for the new paint. Then, when painting with the water-based paint, any splatters are just cleaned up with a wet cloth before it dries, and cleaning up is a dream. It means a bit of extra work now, but I think I will see a big benefit whenever I have to repaint.

And no significant smells! The water based paint we used on the front door seems to have eirked well. But it was so hot that the undercoat was touch dry within about three mihutes - my pet jumping spiders were all over it before I had finnished the section, and they did not get stuck nor left any foot-prints.

The only thing is if it dries so fast brush marks do not have a chance to smooth out, needs good quality brushes. However, the plastic haired ones from a discount store seem to work very well, the first time. No matter how carefully you wash them they do not seem to work do well after that.

Well, it's still quite cold here and the paint takes about an hour to get touch dry. I don't like winter, but it's the best time to paint.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 21, 2017, 08:31:12 PM
I have recently become away of an aspect of vocation v avocation that possibly borders on philosophy.

At the bottom of our shared staicase is a sheet of ply, 1m by 4ft (half a standard 8 by 4 sheet cut to 1m on one side).  It's intended to be an extension worktop in my attic workshop and is that size because that is the largest I can get into my motorized shopping trolley/kid buggy of a car and if over 1m wide I can't get past it, without sucking my now almost non-existent gut in, when in use. Only I forgot something when I asked them to cut it - the biggest sheet I can get through the attic hatch, on the diagonal, is about 35.5" or 900mm. Not a bother losing that much width. Just a bother cutting it straight, down on the concrete of the parking area, kneeling on ancient knees . . . For some reason my new Makita jigsaw is unwilling to cut this stuff in a sufficiently stratight line, even with a cutting fence (got an offcut to practice on).

My retired builder neighbour, Andy, can't see my problem, "I'll just got through it with a jack-saw for you, like we do on a building site."

"Ah, but can you give me a clean, dead straight cut at an accurate right angle to the adjacent side?"

"Er, no. Why are you so fussy, it will be near enough and you can sand it down."

"But at least two adjacent sides have to be smooth and accurate to act as guides on a cutting/routing table."

On a building site the odd mm or five can be patched up or rubbed off, then filled and painted/plastered/filleted or whatever. I am used to working down to mils in metal - never gonna get that good with the tools and facilities I have but I reckon I can better 0.5mm with care. So I spend a few days, on and off, thinking about it - gathering the wood for getting the sheet off the ground, finding a straight enough bit for a guide (should never have given away that 2m spirit level . . .). After rejecting the jigsaw I am left with the choice of a hand saw (difficult with only 1,5 inches clearance to the concrete) or my "multi-tool" with its semicircular saw blade (cuts a clean edge hard up against the guide but the blade can get hot enough to scorch the wood, and it is slow).

Then I wondered about my new toy, the "rotary tool" with a spiral saw in it . . . Why did I not think of it earlier!? It is smaller than a router but cuts a dead straight, really clean, 1/8" "slot" from side to side! Practiced with it today, just got to remember to cut a little way in from the far side first so the blade does not "kick up" the edge.

But, there is this difference of approach between the builder, applying years of trade practice he learned at his dad's knee, and probably working to a time limit in reality,  and the lab tech who is learning to use tools new to him to do a job that is new to him, wants as precision a job as he can manage and as little re-work as can be avoided. Oh, there will be some careful re-measuring and micro-adjusting to do, but once the cutting is done I am in familiar territory. Planning is cheaper than a new sheet of plywood!

And I ain't on a time budget.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 22, 2017, 08:26:47 AM
I enjoyed reading that, Cloucester. I often face similar problems because I only have hand power tools. I have found a good trick to get a perfectly straight, smooth edge when cutting large sheets of ply to an exact width. I cut the board about 1mm wider than needed using a handheld rotary power saw and a straight piece of wood or aluminium as a guide. Then I use my router fitted with a straight edge trim bit (the type that has a little bearing at the tip) to trim back to the correct width. I clamp the guide on the underside of the board on the exact pencil line that marks the correct width of the board, so that the little bearing on the router bit runs against it. It would be so much easier to use a table power saw, but I do not have a workshop at home.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 22, 2017, 08:54:46 AM
Understand you technique, Hermes, but have not yet got that type of bit. Seems to work setting the guide puece of wood the width of the router foot minus half the diameter of the cutting but. Thus the tool cuts on the wanted line. Luckily, for my purposes, that dimension does not have to be exact - just as straight as possible and as close to a right angle with an adjacent side as I can achieve..

At the moment I need dry weather as well!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on July 22, 2017, 08:47:05 PM
I'm putting together a pool table that I got from my cpusin. She didn't give me the tubes for the ball return or sticks. She said there were no sticks but said everything else was there. I didn't see any tubes however.

Some screws are missing or don't match the corresponding parallel side. The nails to hold the pockets are difficult to hammer in due to little space inside the pocket. And the slate under the felt is not completely smooth either.

My Dad has plenty of screws though and I'm okay with some of them being different as long as they are invisible. The nails may be put in at a angle I have not tried yet. And the felt seems to smooth out the inconsistencies with the slate underneath. So all I really need are sticks for which there are plenty of sports stores here.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 23, 2017, 03:47:32 AM
Could you use a punch to drive the nails in Arturo? Might work if you aren't dealing with an angle issue.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on July 23, 2017, 06:20:25 AM
Could you use a punch to drive the nails in Arturo? Might work if you aren't dealing with an angle issue.

The nails are really small. Might as well be needles. Barely a head on them as well.

I tried using something flat against the head and ended up bending the nail.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 23, 2017, 02:24:38 PM
A lesson learned!

New to this routing game I decided to try for that accurate cut on that sheet of ply. I clamped the guide in place then put six other clamps on the corners and middle of the long bit to hold it off the concrete.

Soon discovered that routing a meter long cut in the workshop, nicely clamped to bits of wood on the workmate, is a lot different than the same length cut on a big sheet that is poorly suspended and vibrates like a giant kettle drum! I now have about another 1/4 inch to trim off, but at least I got it through the hatch into the attic!

Know your tool, practice (and initial mistakes) make eventual (near as you can get) perfection.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 23, 2017, 05:38:50 PM
A lesson learned!

New to this routing game I decided to try for that accurate cut on that sheet of ply. I clamped the guide in place then put six other clamps on the corners and middle of the long bit to hold it off the concrete.

Soon discovered that routing a meter long cut in the workshop, nicely clamped to bits of wood on the workmate, is a lot different than the same length cut on a big sheet that is poorly suspended and vibrates like a giant kettle drum! I now have about another 1/4 inch to trim off, but at least I got it through the hatch into the attic!

Know your tool, practice (and initial mistakes) make eventual (near as you can get) perfection.

Something I've discovered is that on the first router pass, just set a depth of 1mm. After that, multiple passes with 3mm increments. This works much better than trying to do the full depth in one go.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 23, 2017, 06:13:48 PM
A lesson learned!

New to this routing game I decided to try for that accurate cut on that sheet of ply. I clamped the guide in place then put six other clamps on the corners and middle of the long bit to hold it off the concrete.

Soon discovered that routing a meter long cut in the workshop, nicely clamped to bits of wood on the workmate, is a lot different than the same length cut on a big sheet that is poorly suspended and vibrates like a giant kettle drum! I now have about another 1/4 inch to trim off, but at least I got it through the hatch into the attic!

Know your tool, practice (and initial mistakes) make eventual (near as you can get) perfection.

Something I've discovered is that on the first router pass, just set a depth of 1mm. After that, multiple passes with 3mm increments. This works much better than trying to do the full depth in one go.
Good advice, thanks, Hermes! This is not really a router but a rotary tool mounted on a base. The single support point is not really stiff enough and difficult to set depth with - I set it all the way, 10mm, on the first pass! Thinking back to the bloke who did my kitchen counters, yes, he did a shallow cut first. Can't remember if there were two or three cuts, but that was inch thick stuff. (Wish my workbench was...)

Might have been better using the "spiral saw" bit, effectively that has a continuous cutting edge moving down the "saw" at an angle, rather than the two straight flutes on the routing tool  bit - less vibration. More like a "spinning spiral knife" than a saw. Now I get a bit more practice ttimming that edge accurately up in the attic. They claim this tool is Dremel compatible, hope that goes for the Dremel plunger router base (with two depth stops) that should be delivered soon.

I keep wondering how some people stay in business when they ask fifty quid for that accessory and others sell it for less than half that! But a 2:1 price difference seems not uncommon on the web.

This thread is doing what I hoped it would. Thanks guys.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 23, 2017, 06:29:22 PM
I always check to see where tools were made, especially anything that cuts, like router bits, drill bits, hacksaw blades, etc. I avoid anything made in China (and half the price) like the plague!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on July 23, 2017, 06:32:16 PM
My pool table is together :D And the nails were as I figured - to be put in at a funky angle.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on July 23, 2017, 06:33:36 PM
I always check to see where tools were made, especially anything that cuts, like router bits, drill bits, hacksaw blades, etc. I avoid anything made in China (and half the price) like the plague!

That's a good idea! I should tell my Dad that.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 23, 2017, 07:09:20 PM
I always check to see where tools were made, especially anything that cuts, like router bits, drill bits, hacksaw blades, etc. I avoid anything made in China (and half the price) like the plague!

Understand that, though I have some Chinese stuff that has given good service, like a set of three 350mm masonery bits that I bought for £1 about 20 years, and much more than that holes through house walls, ago. The rotary tool, and all its sharp bits, is branded Von Haus which is registered in the US but must source its increfible range of ptiducts elsewhere - probsbly China. So we are down to the spec v price and quality control issues. I expect it not to be the quality of a Dremel (wonder if those are made in China as well these days?) but something sufficient for the fairly light use it will get with me. It got mostly good reviews with a few single stars that sound like quality control issues, overheating and flexible shaft failure. Not had either of those - so far.... One complained about variable speed but mine has a "soft start" function and as you complete the cut, and the load comes off, it quickly reduces speed. Looks like there is an electronic speed control that compensates for the load, by shoving in more amps or pulses, then quits when not needed.

As for the router base, according to all the ads it is a genuine Dremel accessory and mine is coming from Amazon. Will see what is on the packing and the part itself.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 23, 2017, 07:47:55 PM
There probably are some manufacturers over there that have respectable quality control protocols in place, but I have had nothing but bad experiences with Chinese tools. These days I would rather pay more for something and know I have a better chance of not being disappointed with its performance.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 23, 2017, 08:43:55 PM
There probably are some manufacturers over there that have respectable quality control protocols in place, but I have had nothing but bad experiences with Chinese tools. These days I would rather pay more for something and know I have a better chance of not being disappointed with its performance.

Problem is that branded stuff is not akways marked with the country of manufacture. If you find a reliable, well known, long history, brand you might still get Chinese made stuff. Yeah, avoid stuff from people like Sourcingmap or whoever if it is critical. Most cheap LEDs last no more than 10k hours when, for ten times the price, you csn get ones that last 50k hours! For something that will get to glow for maybe 5% of the time or less and then suffer suffer a design change, I settle for cheap. For the indicator for my friend's "always on" mower charger and her fish tank light I opted for the expensive ones.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 24, 2017, 04:09:11 AM
I always check to see where tools were made, especially anything that cuts, like router bits, drill bits, hacksaw blades, etc. I avoid anything made in China (and half the price) like the plague!

It's hard to to find drills that aren't made in China anymore. China has become the twist drill capital of the world. You can still get Greenfield's Chicago Latrobe branded drills and Norsemen but those are mail order -and expensive - if you don't have the option of an industrial supply house like Grainger. Even if you have an account Grainger has been shutting down locations recently, so mail order or the hardware store variety is the only reasonable option. 

I will say that Chinese tooling has come leaps and bounds from where it was just a few years ago. There was a time that a drill or a wrench made in China was considered a joke. We got burned badly in an abrasive chop saw fifteen years ago but today, I wouldn't have second thoughts about buying one similar. The quality has improved that much. Heck, I recently watched a test of a Chinese mag drill that was about a quarter the cost of a Fein or Milwaukee. It was loud and ran a little hot but did just about everything you could ask of a mag drill short of line boring.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on July 24, 2017, 05:33:13 PM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 24, 2017, 05:40:36 PM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

If it is a wooden door, it's not too difficult. Metal is more of a challenge.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2017, 03:40:06 AM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on July 25, 2017, 04:19:17 AM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.

Well the hinges have to be set correctly if they are not already not notched into the door. That would be the mist difficult part in my end because that kind of stuff is over my head completely.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 25, 2017, 06:19:37 AM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.

And ear plugs for the children.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 25, 2017, 07:47:13 AM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.

Eh?
Plus a chisel for setting in the hinges and (if mortice type) lock and plate, flat-bit or auger for setting in the lock itself, or hole saw for whst we call a "Yale' lock over here.

Assuming it is not a modern double glazed plastic/metal frame door!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 25, 2017, 10:56:55 AM
Well, another lesson learned: when a manufacturer claims his product is "compatible" with another that might mesn the other's cutting bits etc fit in it.

It does not mean the product fits the other's accessories... Like a plunge router base.

Let's see if I csn get a refund!

Later: yes I can.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 25, 2017, 11:06:43 AM
I love DIY, but when it comes to certain projects, I would rather get the job done by professionals. An example is this glass door I had installed at the entrance into my apartment. It is quite big, so I was a bit nervous to try and do it myself. The opening that the door fits into is 2.7m high and 2m wide (the ceiling is 3.5m high).
(https://www.happyatheistforum.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi.imgur.com%2FFSUZGK8.jpg&hash=877de32857d31c93af0d0cb94c4db99078f60ac0)

That glass is 10mm thick, acid etched and toughened, and is a product called Matelux. It has a wonderful satin surface I like very much.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 25, 2017, 11:36:08 AM
Wow! Some door! Impressive!

I can see why yiu were a mite afrit to tackle the job, must weigh a fair bit - going by the weight of my 10mm thick corner type computer desk top.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 25, 2017, 11:52:25 AM
Yes, the pieces of glass were rather heavy. The two guys who came to install it were very efficient, though, and did the job in less than two hours. It would have taken me 2 days.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2017, 01:38:04 PM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.

Eh?
Plus a chisel for setting in the hinges and (if mortice type) lock and plate, flat-bit or auger for setting in the lock itself, or hole saw for whst we call a "Yale' lock over here.

Assuming it is not a modern double glazed plastic/metal frame door!

Chisel, yes! One of those things I have so many of lying around that I forget about. The augers go in the kit with the screw gun. It's a good thing I'm not a contractor. I'd spend as much time running to the hardware store as I do on the job...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2017, 01:55:37 PM
Yes, the pieces of glass were rather heavy. The two guys who came to install it were very efficient, though, and did the job in less than two hours. It would have taken me 2 days.

That looks like a bank vault! At least the ones at the branch banks around here. Very cool.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 25, 2017, 03:32:33 PM
Yes, the pieces of glass were rather heavy. The two guys who came to install it were very efficient, though, and did the job in less than two hours. It would have taken me 2 days.

That looks like a bank vault! At least the ones at the branch banks around here. Very cool.

Thank you. My taste is very much what used to be called Hi-Tech. That is probably why I like Norman Foster's architecture so much.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 25, 2017, 03:47:43 PM
Yes, the pieces of glass were rather heavy. The two guys who came to install it were very efficient, though, and did the job in less than two hours. It would have taken me 2 days.

That looks like a bank vault! At least the ones at the branch banks around here. Very cool.

Thank you. My taste is very much what used to be called Hi-Tech. That is probably why I like Norman Foster's architecture so much.

With you as far as I can take in in my tiny flat. Metal framed, sprayed silver, furniture with etched glass tops and doors, etched glass shelves mostly and a six bladed ceiling fan that looks like it came out of a lab. My folding table has a wood frame but white panels and there is a skeleton framed drawer unit where the drawers are made of a steel mesh.

Idea was partly to get as much light and as little shadow into the room, when half the wall space was covered in book shelves it looked half the size.. Looks a bit industrial but, suits me! Predominant colours white, blue and red with a touch of yellow. Shelves mainly covered in books and science/tech toys. Oh, and dust.

With you on Foster as wrll, admired that man for a long time.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on July 25, 2017, 03:57:37 PM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.
I think I just need a crow bar or whatever the small ones are called.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2017, 04:39:42 PM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.
I think I just need a crow bar or whatever the small ones are called.

A Stanley Wonder Bar would be just about perfect. Even better if you can sharpen it just a tick. Not a cutting edge but the new Stanley bars are just a bit dull to slip in well.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2017, 09:54:06 PM
The washing machine is now fixed. Hopefully anyway... what do you guys do with all the extra screws and widgets that inevitably materialize after a project like this?












































Just kidding. All screws and widgets accounted for.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 25, 2017, 10:16:37 PM
I waz gonna ssy, no "potentially useful bits bin?

More year ago than I care to remember, on being posted to Bahrein by the RAF, I stripped my motocycle combination down to bits that I could get through the gate into the back yard. Dad was left with instructions to take the oily wrag out of the plug holes, give each cylinder a squirt of Redex then turn the engine over, with the kickstart, once a month.

When I returned I put it all back together - but I had one 1/2" by 3" bolt left over with a nut and washer.  I worried over where this belonged for about an hour when Mum called me in for a cuppa. "You look puzzled", so I told her why and showed her the nut anf bolt.

"Oh, I found that down the road and put it in your box in case it was useful."

The thing was it had traces of blue paint on the head, just like the sidecar frame!

 :eyeroll:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2017, 10:30:51 PM
That sounds like a potential nightmare. Especially on a motorcycle. I'd have taken it all back apart again if nobody told me where it came from. And then probably found somewhere to stick it during reassembly!

Back in high school one of our shop projects was converting a Ford 8700 naturally aspirated tractor to a turbo setup. It involved swapping the crank and connecting rods from a trashed 9700. During the teardown our shop teacher had a designated bucket for all the bolts. Some how that bucket got lost. And thus... two tractors went to the great scrapyard in the sky...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on July 26, 2017, 01:10:52 AM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.
I think I just need a crow bar or whatever the small ones are called.

Prybar
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 26, 2017, 05:27:26 AM
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.
I think I just need a crow bar or whatever the small ones are called.

Prybar

Nah, crowbar!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 30, 2017, 05:25:14 AM
Hey, Gloucester, you've been quiet - what are you up to?

Yesterday, I started replacing the porcelain edge tiles on the steps surrounding my daughter's swimming pool. I first tried some quick-setting cement, but it was too goopy and kept flowing down. It is a wonderful product that sets rock hard in an hour, but not really easy to use for this job. I have decided to get some tile adhesive and try that instead. Any advice will be appreciated.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 30, 2017, 06:40:19 AM
Hey, Gloucester, you've been quiet - what are you up to?

Yesterday, I started replacing the porcelain edge tiles on the steps surrounding my daughter's swimming pool. I first tried some quick-setting cement, but it was too goopy and kept flowing down. It is a wonderful product that sets rock hard in an hour, but not really easy to use for this job. I have decided to get some tile adhesive and try that instead. Any advice will be appreciated.

Eh? You have been quieter than I!  :grin:

Don't know much about tiling, only tried it once using conventional tiling crment in my bsthroom.

Are these vertical, horizontsl or 90o "corner" edge tiles ?

Only stuff I have done lately is help a neighbor rehang the wall cupboards in his kitchen so they actually line up.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 30, 2017, 06:57:37 AM
Hey, Gloucester, you've been quiet - what are you up to?

Yesterday, I started replacing the porcelain edge tiles on the steps surrounding my daughter's swimming pool. I first tried some quick-setting cement, but it was too goopy and kept flowing down. It is a wonderful product that sets rock hard in an hour, but not really easy to use for this job. I have decided to get some tile adhesive and try that instead. Any advice will be appreciated.

Eh? You have been quieter than I!  :grin:

Don't know much about tiling, only tried it once using conventional tiling crment in my bsthroom.

Are these vertical, horizontsl or 90o "corner" edge tiles ?

Only stuff I have done lately is help a neighbor rehang the wall cupboards in his kitchen so they actually line up.

Yes, I have been doing some odd jobs in the apartment and have not posted much. I am also working on the details of a new sculpture I want to make.

The tiles are 90 degree edging tiles with a rounded edge, I think also called nose tiles, made of porcelain. I will buy some porcelain adhesive today and try it tomorrow, because my daughter and grandson are out all day today. The original tilers did not do a good job, so some have loosened over the years.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 30, 2017, 07:00:22 AM
Forgot to mention they are horizontal edges on the steps.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 31, 2017, 03:31:53 AM
I went to a flea market for the first time today. Was looking for a tap wrench or two but found a guy with some old tools and came away with two ratchets for the farm, one an SK and the other a Proto, and a pair of what I suspext are Snap On duck bill pliers. Compared to retail I saved about 95% and had a good chat with the guy at the table.

He tried to get me to come back tomorrow when he found out the ratchets were going to farm duty as he has a bunch of 3/4 drive stuff he'd sell me cheap! It's probably a good thing the flea market isn't right down the road... most of the other sellers were seriously overpriced on what they had. I do need at least on 3/4 drive extension but wasn't paying new prices for picked over, rusty stuff.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 31, 2017, 03:52:52 AM
Hey, Gloucester, you've been quiet - what are you up to?

Yesterday, I started replacing the porcelain edge tiles on the steps surrounding my daughter's swimming pool. I first tried some quick-setting cement, but it was too goopy and kept flowing down. It is a wonderful product that sets rock hard in an hour, but not really easy to use for this job. I have decided to get some tile adhesive and try that instead. Any advice will be appreciated.

Do you have a product called thinset over there? Mix it to a consistency where it doesn't run? That's what I'd try anyway. The funky looking tile trowels are supposed to help too. So you end up with the right amount of adhesive.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 31, 2017, 04:55:17 AM
Hey, Gloucester, you've been quiet - what are you up to?

Yesterday, I started replacing the porcelain edge tiles on the steps surrounding my daughter's swimming pool. I first tried some quick-setting cement, but it was too goopy and kept flowing down. It is a wonderful product that sets rock hard in an hour, but not really easy to use for this job. I have decided to get some tile adhesive and try that instead. Any advice will be appreciated.

Do you have a product called thinset over there? Mix it to a consistency where it doesn't run? That's what I'd try anyway. The funky looking tile trowels are supposed to help too. So you end up with the right amount of adhesive.

Thanks, but I have bought an adhesive that they assure me is the correct thing, so I will try it this week.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 06, 2017, 10:42:48 AM
I mentioned the "Men in sheds" thjng on other threads, ssying that the guy had not git in contact. Now, five days lster, he has.

Seems they meet, once a week, in a unit in a local industrial estate, right next to the county police HQ! They are setting up a workshop and do community as well as private projects, have talks and demos etc.

Could be interesting.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 06, 2017, 08:09:32 PM
Been tinkering with an old vise today. Got the screw cleaned up with the wire wheel and might head to town the grab a can of paint stripper to prep the body. It's small, beat up, and not a particularly useful style but makes for a fun project. The slide is a bit bent so I might risk persuading it back into line. Or I might just paint it and have it as a conversation piece. It was found in an old barn we tire down.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 06, 2017, 08:51:28 PM
Been tinkering with an old vise today. Got the screw cleaned up with the wire wheel and might head to town the grab a can of paint stripper to prep the body. It's small, beat up, and not a particularly useful style but makes for a fun project. The slide is a bit bent so I might risk persuading it back into line. Or I might just paint it and have it as a conversation piece. It was found in an old barn we tire down.

Heh, conversation piece, eh? Since "vise" is a homophone of "vice" and that one was dirty and needed stripping - there's room for a chain-pull somewhere in there!

I keep looking for an old, wooden block plane. Ever since I saw one in a craft exhibition fitted with a mast, sail, stays, lifebuoys etc and titled "Plane Sailing" I have wanted to copy it!

Perhaps we need a thread on "Favourite conversation pieces"!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 06, 2017, 10:12:52 PM
I'm actually impressed by how well the paint has held up. The wire wheel removed a layer of grime and rust to reveal mostly intact hunter green paint. This has me wondering if'n I should leave it rough, given the poor condition of the screw and handle and attempt some sort of clear coat. The screw and handle are currently undergoing a BLO treatment but I might soak them in acetone to remove it for clear.

On another note; does anybody besides Rigid make a halfway decent pipe wrench?! I wrecked two today getting the handle free. Both of German manufacture. My 6" Rigid which was purchased as an extractor worked marvelously once I found an appropriate cheater. No damage to the teeth whatsoever. The two longer German wrenches might get used for yard art...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 06, 2017, 10:17:36 PM
Been tinkering with an old vise today. Got the screw cleaned up with the wire wheel and might head to town the grab a can of paint stripper to prep the body. It's small, beat up, and not a particularly useful style but makes for a fun project. The slide is a bit bent so I might risk persuading it back into line. Or I might just paint it and have it as a conversation piece. It was found in an old barn we tire down.

Heh, conversation piece, eh? Since "vise" is a homophone of "vice" and that one was dirty and needed stripping - there's room for a chain-pull somewhere in there!

I keep looking for an old, wooden block plane. Ever since I saw one in a craft exhibition fitted with a mast, sail, stays, lifebuoys etc and titled "Plane Sailing" I have wanted to copy it!

Perhaps we need a thread on "Favourite conversation pieces"!

The old wooden plane bodies are high priced items in antique stores. I found a pair in town with NO irons or chip breakers that the proprietor wanted $40 a piece for! You might be able to find an inexpensive japanese block plane that would suit your purposes. I got one for about ten dollars for use on doors and the like. Be aware that changes in humidity during shipping will make it very, very difficult to remove the iron. I had to clamp a vise grip and smack the body with a deadbolt for nearly an hour. Still haven't tuned it for reassembly.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 07, 2017, 04:20:34 AM
(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t31.0-8/fr/cp0/e15/q65/20617125_1402225749873564_5559319236002511355_o.jpg?efg=eyJpIjoidCJ9&oh=9d3357a640eaedc4d6de22c25f3e58a9&oe=59F119E2)

As you can see, it had been out in the weather for a while. I'm really suprise it cleaned up as nicely as it did. It took about a month of soaking in penetrant and some judicious rapping with a hammer to free it up. Has a certain charm though, doesn't it?

The next step will be to, hopefully, drill the old cotter pin from the screw and then go to work on the fixed and dynsmic jaws in earnest. I'm not sure how far I'm going to go on the swivel base. The old square peg style never had a lot of holding power and it isn't for actual use at any rate.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 07, 2017, 05:43:12 AM
Oh, dear, I must have a really dirty mind (at my age and vondition it's about all one is left with!) but that image immediately brings certain adjectives to mind. Mostly similar to a certain cocktail... but adding "rough" into the mix.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 07, 2017, 07:54:20 PM
I picked up some paint stripper and I'm not too sure about it. Might work very well but it doesn't seem toxic enough to be effective. Time will tell.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 07, 2017, 11:02:15 PM
Time told and the paint stripper was completely innefective. A wire wheel at high speeds was also innefective. So was scraping after stripper and the wire wheel. That paint is TOUGH!

Next attempt will be with a heat gun. If that doesn't do the trick I'll break out the torch. If that doesn't work I'll fire up the forge and chuck it in... one advantage to the forge is that any remaining rust comes off with minimal effort at a red heat.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 08, 2017, 07:56:53 PM
Well, eventually found "Men in the Shed". On the industrial estate but not in a unit - in a Portacabin on a corner of land not yet developed.

Six chaps there of about my vintage, teo struggling with a portable petrol-generator unit, it would not start and is thrir only power supply. Finally got the cover off the conttol psnrl (by drilling out the screw heads, they were rusted solid) and found inside - a rodent's nest! Loads of chewed up rag etc, mostly rotted. The engine ignition switch was japut so they dragged the wires out and twisted them together. Then it started, just. Time to put the kettle on. Er. 1800W generator - 2400W kettle. Well, just took a while to come to the boil.

Kit at the moment is a smallish wood lathe, small band saw, some battery and mains hand tools (still in boxes, could not see just what.) Their current priorities are shelters for the wood stock and the generator. This is only their second week at the site.

My gout was giving me problems so I peeled off after an hour of intros and swapping sarcastic comments around. Very friendly, nothing like as "cliquey" as similar groups I have seen. Hope foot is better next week!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 09, 2017, 12:11:12 AM
That reminds me of trying to run an air compressor off a generator at a friend's shop. The genny did not like that at all. Shame too, he has a nearly full compliment of air tools and more than enough compressor to run them but no 240v power.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 10, 2017, 09:40:02 PM
Not really a workshop thing, but has applications there if your eyes are lije mine.

Found a "magnifying glass"  in the Google shop, Alfarays Magnifier x30 zoom, . Gives x30 magnification and takes pictures. Friend showed me an app buiot into the "Accessibility" tools on his latest iPhone. Luckily other apps available. Good for getting a more precise measurement off a steel rule!

Being a zoom tool, of course, the image quality depends on the camera in your phone. Mine, at 12Mpix, handles the max 30x quite well enough for my purposes.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 22, 2017, 09:37:55 PM
Had to do a quick repair on my brake light switch today. A piece of tape and a penny have me back to normal... ish for now. I'm glad someone noticed that the lights were on when they did. The car sat with the battery disconnected until I could get to it for a quick repair!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 03, 2017, 02:47:33 PM
Going to try to find a replacement cv axle today znd try to get it on either this afternoon or tomorrow morning. New ball joints will be going in as well. Might grab a new boot for the other axle too but that should be okay for another week or so. I can fix that one when new front brakes go on.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 03, 2017, 02:55:55 PM
Busy, busy, busy...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 03, 2017, 03:16:17 PM
A twenty year old car keeps you busy. Or broke if'n you take it to a shop. I prefer to stay busy...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 04, 2017, 11:04:30 PM
Well the new axle is in after I wasted an hour going to exchange the one I bought yesterday for the correct part. They sold me a driver's side axle in a passenger side box... and the ball joints didn't go in either. For one, all my adapters were too big and for two, I had forgotten how difficult it is to hold a press, steering knuckle, adapters, and a ball joint when you only have two hands. I'll get my brother to lend a hand on Sunday. And get to take the whole thing apart again.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 05, 2017, 01:09:30 AM
Going to admit I have got to the point where I would rather pay the locsl service shop £60 to do ny oil and filter change than scrabble abiut under the car myself.

It was great before my self-employed mobile car mechanic neighbour moved, I swapped being his towed driver and other easy tasks for such small (to him) jobs. Admittedly when I was in work I did turning jobs and repaired (by welding) things like cracked generator brackets (or even made new ones) for him. Even made a few "custom" tools and new, small, wire looms.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 05, 2017, 03:45:38 AM
I've grown to rather enjoy the scramble. Figuring out how things go together is actually quite a bit of fun. Doing basic maintanance is a chore but an oil change only takes a few minutes and too many places that specialize in oil and lube are scam artists in Red Cap shirts!

What's really fun is diagnostic work and I've been doing a bit of that in my spare time using my pitiful excuse for a scan tool, and armed with knowledge from the likes od ScannerDanner and Matt Schrodinger. It's pretty amazing how much you can figure out with a $20 scanner that works through your phone and an understanding of fuel trims.

I have a $50 gift card through work that I'd like to put towards either an oscilloscope or a graphing multimeter. I asked around looking for an older, used Snap On graphing meter but all anybody wants to part with is their newer, fancier, and highly unreliable units. The Vantage MT 2400 is practically a unicorn anymore but the Vantage Ultra can be had new off the truck... frustrating.

The next option would be either a usb scope and be stuck lugging a laptop around or a handheld graphing meter that isn't very capable. I can't decide between just pulling the trigger on a cheaper usb scope that has poor software or waiting and buying a better one down the road a bit.

Hantek makes a decent scope but the software is problematic. Pico makes excellent scopes with fantastic software but are at least twice the price, and even then you are losing functionality. Fewer channels, lower frequencies, etc. Maybe I'll come across something in the meantime.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 05, 2017, 05:47:21 AM
I admire you guys for being able to work on cars. I am a dedicated do-it-yourselfer, but have always been too chicken  :chairhide: to try any engine work myself. On top of that, I always buy new cars and they have always warned me not to touch anything, or the warranty would be voided. That actually suits me quite well. Gives me more time to pursue my other interests.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 05, 2017, 08:29:19 AM
^
^
Love the diagnostic stuff, just getting too old and infirm for the physical. Also no heavy jacking gear, ramos, pit etc.

Doubt that my delicate little single channel digital pocket 'scope would be much use in a car workshop environment!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 15, 2018, 02:49:56 AM
I just got done fixing our electric furnace today. With 20°F nights it has been rough the last few days and I finally got confirmation that the heat sequencer I purchased would work despite not being an exact replacement. I still have to drop a few screws in to secure everything but the $11 sequencer and $25 thermostat saved a $300 service call. So there was a small victory there.

Now I'm on the hunt for a few current clamps for my scope. A friend's project truck may have a blown head gasket - who woulda thought turbocharging an otherwise stock engine could cause problems ;D - and the scope method is much simpler than pulling all of the spark plugs. Plus, it's cool to check with just a laptop and a few leads.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on January 15, 2018, 05:22:28 AM
I just got done fixing our electric furnace today. With 20°F nights it has been rough the last few days and I finally got confirmation that the heat sequencer I purchased would work despite not being an exact replacement. I still have to drop a few screws in to secure everything but the $11 sequencer and $25 thermostat saved a $300 service call. So there was a small victory there.

Now I'm on the hunt for a few current clamps for my scope. A friend's project truck may have a blown head gasket - who woulda thought turbocharging an otherwise stock engine could cause problems ;D - and the scope method is much simpler than pulling all of the spark plugs. Plus, it's cool to check with just a laptop and a few leads.

If you are checking the HT I think there is also an electrostatic method where you wrap foil around the plug lead and shunt the output from that with a parallel capacitor or, better to get the waveform, a large series resistor. Can't remember the values or math now.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: OldGit on January 15, 2018, 09:45:29 AM
You can quickly check the HT by grasping a bared bit of lead. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on January 15, 2018, 09:55:31 AM
You can quickly check the HT by grasping a bared bit of lead. :)

With older cars just hold the lead! They get leaky over the years and you see some nice fireworks looking under the bonnet in the dark!

And some modern systems don't have a wire in them, just a carbon impregated thread. So you take out the plus, put the lead back on and hold the metal part of the plug. Put your other hand on any part of the car and get someone to operate the key. If you have to get back up off the ground again chances are you have HT on that lead.

You need the spark gap to develop the full voltage and the classical "h" shaped waveform.

Hmm, wonder what happens if you put a low energy flourescent bulb against the plug lead . . . ?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 15, 2018, 03:08:01 PM
I just got done fixing our electric furnace today. With 20°F nights it has been rough the last few days and I finally got confirmation that the heat sequencer I purchased would work despite not being an exact replacement. I still have to drop a few screws in to secure everything but the $11 sequencer and $25 thermostat saved a $300 service call. So there was a small victory there.

Now I'm on the hunt for a few current clamps for my scope. A friend's project truck may have a blown head gasket - who woulda thought turbocharging an otherwise stock engine could cause problems ;D - and the scope method is much simpler than pulling all of the spark plugs. Plus, it's cool to check with just a laptop and a few leads.

If you are checking the HT I think there is also an electrostatic method where you wrap foil around the plug lead and shunt the output from that with a parallel capacitor or, better to get the waveform, a large series resistor. Can't remember the values or math now.

We're not checking the wires. There's only about six inches from the plug to the ignition coil and they were replaced along with the plugs during upgrades to save the coils any trouble. Bit of cheap insurance.

The plan is to use the first channel with a high current clamp probe on the starter wire and have the second channel packprobed into one of the injectors, most likely on cylinder three. Then we can compare the starter current draw across all eight cylinders to look for low compression and know exactly which cylinders are low by referencing the number three injetor pulse.

If needed, we can then pull one plug, likely again the number three, and use a compression gauge to get a hard number which can be used to calculate the actual values in all of the other cylinders. A challenging engine configuration makes this the least invasive and most reasonable way to test. Of it was unmodified pulling plugs and using the gauge wouldn't be a problem.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 15, 2018, 03:12:26 PM
You can quickly check the HT by grasping a bared bit of lead. :)

Kind of like tossing a charged capacitor at someone...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on January 15, 2018, 04:36:03 PM
You can quickly check the HT by grasping a bared bit of lead. :)

Kind of like tossing a charged capacitor at someone...

Had that done to me in training! Quickly learned to dance sideways, hands behind back or above the head, after that...

The other trick was to stand on two rubber mats then charge yourelf up to 25kV with an EHT generator, dropping the probe before the trick.  You know there is going to be a shock but the other guy does not!  Not actually much worse than a good electrostatic shock, an open palm slap spreads the current.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 04, 2018, 05:51:10 PM
I narrowly avoided a really bad bench grinder accident today. Was knocking the rust from the iron and chip breader to a Stanley No. 4 hand plane sith the wire wheel and the grinder grabbed so hard that it reversed the grinder for a few seconds. It switched directions again so I kept on working. When I turned the machine off there was a terrible rattling from the stone on the other side.

Turns out... the reversal loosened the arbor nut holding the stone in place and had very nearly rattled itself off. I checked the stone for ring and assembled everything again but I'm thinking about putting some thread locker, just in case. If that stone had knocked around any more and exploded I'd probably be in the hospital right now.

In positive news the plane is coming along rather nicely. I still need to clean up some of the hardware and flatten the sole but it should work wonderfully once I'm done.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 04, 2018, 06:33:27 PM
Ooh, nasty! Yeah, reversing an angle grinder is not recommrndade. I know it does not apply to angle gtinders but have lost count of how msny times I have explsined to prople why dome things have left hsnd tgresds. In one case one each of left and right at opposite ends of a spindle.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on February 05, 2018, 12:17:28 AM
Bench grinders can be wicked and dangerous as you are well aware JJ.  I once blew up a greenstone wheel that I was attempting to true up with a diamond dresser.  Not like I had never done that before.  I just goofed by raising the diamond tip above center.  The green stone disintigrated and a sizable piece hit me in the head, knocked me flat on my ass, broke my glasses, caused some blood, scared hell out of me. I wont be doing that again.

Stay safe JJ.  Those damned machines are evil things that have no respect for humans.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 05, 2018, 05:38:39 AM
Ooh, nasty! Yeah, reversing an angle grinder is not recommrndade. I know it does not apply to angle gtinders but have lost count of how msny times I have explsined to prople why dome things have left hsnd tgresds. In one case one each of left and right at opposite ends of a spindle.

What suprised me  was the fact that the side that backed off was left hand thread. Thinking more about  the situation it seems that Black and Decker screwed up which side was which.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 05, 2018, 05:43:47 AM
Bench grinders can be wicked and dangerous as you are well aware JJ.  I once blew up a greenstone wheel that I was attempting to true up with a diamond dresser.  Not like I had never done that before.  I just goofed by raising the diamond tip above center.  The green stone disintigrated and a sizable piece hit me in the head, knocked me flat on my ass, broke my glasses, caused some blood, scared hell out of me. I wont be doing that again.

Stay safe JJ.  Those damned machines are evil things that have no respect for humans.

I almost switched to a green wheel for sharpening tungsten but the deal I had lined up for a tig machine fell through. Having now read the msds for silicon carbide I think if I ever do find a tig I'll rig up a diamond wheel of some sort. There's a fellow named Stephan Gotteswinter who put together a cheap and effective diamond wheel for his small tool makers shop that I like.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 05, 2018, 05:52:50 AM
Ooh, nasty! Yeah, reversing an angle grinder is not recommrndade. I know it does not apply to angle gtinders but have lost count of how msny times I have explsined to prople why dome things have left hsnd tgresds. In one case one each of left and right at opposite ends of a spindle.

What suprised me  was the fact that the side that backed off was left hand thread. Thinking more about  the situation it seems that Black and Decker screwed up which side was which.

Think my brain cell is asleep, I read "angle" not "bench" there somehow! Too bloody early am!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 22, 2018, 02:14:43 AM
I'm about to have a roof AND walls I can work under. Well, not under the walls but you know what I mean. The family barn is almost weather tight. Putting the flashing and Ridge cap on today was scary. The tin roof was slick and the wind was really blowing. Got it done though.

(https://s13.postimg.org/ccexda2nb/20180221_131504.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on February 22, 2018, 03:31:41 AM
I'm about to have a roof AND walls I can work under. Well, not under the walls but you know what I mean. The family barn is almost weather tight. Putting the flashing and Ridge cap on today was scary. The tin roof was slick and the wind was really blowing. Got it done though.

(https://s13.postimg.org/ccexda2nb/20180221_131504.jpg)

That is quite an achievement. How long did it take?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 22, 2018, 03:38:12 AM
Years... It sat with open sides and no ridgecap. It took a real chance of structural collapse to get everybody in gear! Hopefully power will come next. Minimum of one 230v circuit for a welder and some lights. The sliding doors are under construction. Might get a floor, someday...

The roof and siding took a few weeks with the English weather we've been having.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 22, 2018, 07:01:13 AM
Quote
The roof and siding took a few weeks with the English weather we've been having.

Tut, JJ, since 90% of our "English" weather comes from the west it is really secondhand American stuff! The rest of it is Scandinavian, Russian or Spanish. Ok, odd bit of Icelandic.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 22, 2018, 02:58:24 PM
Yeah, and if Bruce fats in Texas there'll be a hurricane in Wales...

I suppose we need to think about a floor next. Might be a pain now that it's partly closed from the front. I don't fancy mixing bagged concrete though so we'll have to get a truck in somehow.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on February 23, 2018, 12:39:22 AM
Good for you JJ.  We craftsmen types need a decent place to work.  I too have worked in a primitive dirt floored place....in the distant past. We long for a better place to work but we make do with whatever space we have.  I respect the guys who make do with whatever they have.  That is how we became a nation of do'ers and makers, and fixers.

I have a young friend In Lithuania who has a problem of that sort.  He is an exceptional craftsman but he has had no place to work.  His country is very poor, corrupt, and unbearably cold in winter.  Recently he fell into a pot of jam and found his way into a community workshop that is operated by other poor craftsmen. A wonderful place that is strangled by lack of funds but still operative.  They make most of their tools because they have such a small budget.  They are hot on the trail for building a band saw and also a table saw at this time.  They may be poor but they are determined.   

Some of them are digital savvy and they have rigged up a camera  system that monitors the place in several rooms at all times.  You can actually visit the place by going to :   live.makerspace.lt  They only work on Wednesdays and their hours are from 8 to 11 PM.  But Lithuania is 7 times zone ahead of our eastern standard time.  Two o'clock in our afternoon is 9 Pm for them.  Dave, JJ ,and some of the others of us can commiserate with the guys at "makerspace" and elsewhere.  We are all in this together even though we are  separated by long distances.

Their latest adventure is when they damn near blew up the shop when they were mixing "candy Propellant" for a suborbital rocket they were building.  ( candy propellant is sugar mixed with potassium nitrate, a fertilizer component.)  The shop survived fortunately.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 23, 2018, 01:05:33 AM
Candy propellant you say? I have a feeling that'd attract the authority's attention around here. Reminds me of a friend who was taking apart fireworks to make one BIG one. He was pretty drunk and had sorted the different metal flakes and propellant using a bunch of ashtrays on his coffee table. He had all of those ashtrays because he was a chain smoker. The flash was incredible when he stuffed a butt in the wrong one. PHOOM!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on February 23, 2018, 04:21:47 AM
^ Confucius say: never mess around with explosives when you have had a few too many.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 23, 2018, 06:25:29 AM
Don't they have "Men in Sheds" in America? I think it started in Australia, bunch of people get together, hire some space and turn it into a communal workshop.

Is the American trend not part of the "pioneer spirit", people sloughing off the burden of bad or oppressive governance to go to wild places where it was "adapt or die"? No handy fixit guy, they heeded a full skillset very quickly.

I often wonder what the mortality rate was amongst the less able and how much this influenced the tradition of "neighborliness", skill sharing. Did  America  suffer a sort of evolution, that led to the modern "maker" ethos, because of this.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 23, 2018, 07:22:34 AM
Candy propellant you say? I have a feeling that'd attract the authority's attention around here. Reminds me of a friend who was taking apart fireworks to make one BIG one. He was pretty drunk and had sorted the different metal flakes and propellant using a bunch of ashtrays on his coffee table. He had all of those ashtrays because he was a chain smoker. The flash was incredible when he stuffed a butt in the wrong one. PHOOM!

When I was in the RAF, around Guy Fawkes night, the occupants of another room played a trick on ys just as we were getting ready to go out for a night's drinking and woman chasing (yeah, this was well before PC, or maturity!). They put a firecracker ("banger" as we Brits say) in an adh tray, piled a heap of ash and butts on it, lit it jyst outside our door the opened the door and pushed it in. Then they went for a shower.

We had been doing some cave photography and had a heap of magnesium powder left (this was also before affordable electronic flash). It was the work of a moment to put this in an ashtrsy and added a fuse. Setting this off in a shower area entirely tiled in white resulted in a bunch of guys stumbling around because they could hardly see anything!

They gave us the bang but we supplied them with the flash!

Took ages to get ourselves and the room clean and, relatively, sweet smelling again though.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on February 23, 2018, 07:53:58 AM
I'm about to have a roof AND walls I can work under. Well, not under the walls but you know what I mean. The family barn is almost weather tight. Putting the flashing and Ridge cap on today was scary. The tin roof was slick and the wind was really blowing. Got it done though.

(https://s13.postimg.org/ccexda2nb/20180221_131504.jpg)
Very impressive!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 25, 2018, 09:22:34 PM
To keep busy today I decided to get this hand plane back into shape. It started this morning coated solidly in rust and none of the adjustments were working.

I wish I had before photos but this is the after.

(https://s10.postimg.org/arv1v6tkp/20180225_161156.jpg)

Nice, papery chips. I have the handles but no screws so I'll have to find some. Hopefully it's a modern thread form and not some oddball that's no longer in use. The plane is a Stanley from their Defiance line that ceased production in 1953. It was their lower tier of hand tools but the only difference I can see between it and my Bailey is the absence of a frog adjustment screw.

I still have to flatten the sole but this will make a nice addition and much longer than my Winchester and Bailey planes.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 25, 2018, 09:46:11 PM
(https://s18.postimg.org/4u4z25mqh/20180225_161203.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 25, 2018, 09:53:27 PM
(https://s18.postimg.org/4u4z25mqh/20180225_161203.jpg)

That looks good! Neighbour gave me a big Record plane, still need to fihish sharpening it, blade is wider than my oilstone or diamond boards but fits in the roller jig.. Will try fine emery paper and wet-n-dry on a sheet of toughened glass (kitchen cutting board). When it gets a bit warmer in the attic!

I have a screwdriver just like that as well! (Currently jammed in behind a water pipe to stop it knocking when the washing machine fills!)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on February 25, 2018, 09:58:48 PM
That's a lovely bit of work jj!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 25, 2018, 10:10:45 PM
(https://s18.postimg.org/4u4z25mqh/20180225_161203.jpg)

That looks good! Neighbour gave me a big Record plane, still need to fihish sharpening it, blade is wider than my oilstone or diamond boards but fits in the roller jig.. Will try fine emery paper and wet-n-dry on a sheet of toughened glass (kitchen cutting board). When it gets a bit warmer in the attic!

I have a screwdriver just like that as well! (Currently jammed in behind a water pipe to stop it knocking when the washing machine fills!)

Freehand the plane iron with the iron held at an angle so the stone covers the edge. Basically on a diagonal.

That's my favorite screwdriver handle aside from the older snap on hard handles. The only problem is that the vinyl wrap gets chewed up very easily working on machinery. The vinyl doesn't like shop chemicals and hydraulic fluid. If Klein or Stanley sold the vinyl wraps for replacement I'd probably have a lot more of them.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 25, 2018, 10:14:29 PM
That's a lovely bit of work jj!

I still have one to go through but it might be time for a new wire wheel. I've been pushing it hard and the frequency of bits of wire flying off and sticking me has increased enough to justify a $6 purchase for personal comfort and luxury. I have several Disston hand saws that need sharpening too. Might have to rig up a set measuring aparatus with a dial indicator. Or... just buy a saw setter...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 25, 2018, 10:26:09 PM
That's a lovely bit of work jj!

I still have one to go through but it might be time for a new wire wheel. I've been pushing it hard and the frequency of bits of wire flying off and sticking me has increased enough to justify a $6 purchase for personal comfort and luxury. I have several Disston hand saws that need sharpening too. Might have to rig up a set measuring aparatus with a dial indicator. Or... just buy a saw setter...

On big saws (ie not tennon) my father, a blacksmith, used to set saws with a clamp/bending-bar in a vice, a "triangular" punch that he made for the job and a hammer. He rarely mis-set a tooth. If you rested the punch on the bar the working end sloped the right angle for the set.

I go for hardened teeth ones these days. At the rate I use them they last years.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on February 26, 2018, 03:10:39 AM
Ah yes, I was this afternoon caressing my number 9 Shelton and also my number 6 Stanley low angle plane.   I also took pride in using my Japanese water stone and the angle jig to sharpen the irons. What a delight it is to have a razor sharp iron in a good frame. The delicate peels are a joy to behold.....

I was replacing the arms of a chair that needed some help, according to my wife.  The chair is a Norwegian Korsness brand. It is leather upholstered and part of the arms had become ragged. Friend wife could not live with such a disgraceful chair.  It is my favorite chair and I did not give  a damn that the leather on the arms had become somewhat damaged. It is a comfortable chair even if the arms were getting shabby.

Wife consulted the local agent who sells that brand here in the US. Oh yes we can get new arms in the exact color of leather of your chair.  How much for the replacements? Only $699.  No shit batman.

I had some teak lumber left over from some of my numerous boat building projects. Six hundred ninety nine dollars in a pigs ass !!!!!!   I will build arms from teak.  The body of the chair is teak so it will match or nearly match the wooden parts of the chair.  That is how the band saw and the planes came into play. The lovely gossamer chips from the freshly sharpened planes, almost but not quite, gave me an orgasm.....well not even close to being orgasmic to be honest....,. not at this age....anyway a nice plane is a marvelous tool. I am confident that you guys know the drill and the delight of making beautiful wood chips...... too bad that the shop vac swallows those chips so uncerimoniously.

In a perfect world, Dave, JJ ,and me, along with many of you other guys, girls too, who are by virtue of the gods impelled to make things or fix things, could all assemble in a builders heaven.  We'd build boats to navigate the River Styxx or other needs to assuage our creative instincts.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 26, 2018, 03:54:29 AM
That's a lovely bit of work jj!

I still have one to go through but it might be time for a new wire wheel. I've been pushing it hard and the frequency of bits of wire flying off and sticking me has increased enough to justify a $6 purchase for personal comfort and luxury. I have several Disston hand saws that need sharpening too. Might have to rig up a set measuring aparatus with a dial indicator. Or... just buy a saw setter...

On big saws (ie not tennon) my father, a blacksmith, used to set saws with a clamp/bending-bar in a vice, a "triangular" punch that he made for the job and a hammer. He rarely mis-set a tooth. If you rested the punch on the bar the working end sloped the right angle for the set.

I go for hardened teeth ones these days. At the rate I use them they last years.

It's tough to find a saw that doesnt have hardened teeth these days but even new, they don't cut particularly well. The blade itself isn't ground and the tooth profiles are either a general purpose blade that doesn't rip or crosscut well but can do either acceptably for rough work or are designed to cut MDF and OSB.

I like having a few saws setup for different cuts. It's faster and neater to grab the right hand saw than to get out the circ saw, extension cord, appropriate blade and then put it all together unless you're making a lot of cuts. I do like a power miter saw though. The plastic miter boxes never do very well and the wooden ones I find are all distorted. Could make on I suppose...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on February 26, 2018, 03:55:49 AM
Ah yes, I was this afternoon caressing my number 9 Shelton and also my number 6 Stanley low angle plane.   I also took pride in using my Japanese water stone and the angle jig to sharpen the irons. What a delight it is to have a razor sharp iron in a good frame. The delicate peels are a joy to behold.....

I was replacing the arms of a chair that needed some help, according to my wife.  The chair is a Norwegian Korsness brand. It is leather upholstered and part of the arms had become ragged. Friend wife could not live with such a disgraceful chair.  It is my favorite chair and I did not give  a damn that the leather on the arms had become somewhat damaged. It is a comfortable chair even if the arms were getting shabby.

Wife consulted the local agent who sells that brand here in the US. Oh yes we can get new arms in the exact color of leather of your chair.  How much for the replacements? Only $699.  No shit batman.

I had some teak lumber left over from some of my numerous boat building projects. Six hundred ninety nine dollars in a pigs ass !!!!!!   I will build arms from teak.  The body of the chair is teak so it will match or nearly match the wooden parts of the chair.  That is how the band saw and the planes came into play. The lovely gossamer chips from the freshly sharpened planes, almost but not quite, gave me an orgasm.....well not even close to being orgasmic to be honest....,. not at this age....anyway a nice plane is a marvelous tool. I am confident that you guys know the drill and the delight of making beautiful wood chips...... too bad that the shop vac swallows those chips so uncerimoniously.

In a perfect world, Dave, JJ ,and me, along with many of you other guys, girls too, who are by virtue of the gods impelled to make things or fix things, could all assemble in a builders heaven.  We'd build boats to navigate the River Styxx or other needs to assuage our creative instincts.

Nicely written, Icarus. How about some photos of your handiwork?

I can refer you to a forum I lurk in that that deals with furniture repair questions, usually of modern classics:

http://www.designaddict.com/forum/active?taxonomy_forums_tid=445

Many of the discussions are concerned with Scandinavian furniture.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 26, 2018, 06:27:32 AM
Like that design forum, Hermes, pity it is only furniture - but "design" has so many aspects it might take a good slice of the web to cover it! I would want to push it beyond appreciation to technique, even the maths . . .

JJ, I have an angle cutting jig that is a cast aluminium base, four guide pillars for the saw and holes for pegs to create about 8 different angles. Restricted a bit in depth though, maybe 1.5"
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on February 26, 2018, 07:50:01 AM
Like that design forum, Hermes, pity it is only furniture - but "design" has so many aspects it might take a good slice of the web to cover it! I would want to push it beyond appreciation to technique, even the maths . . .

If I could live my life again, I would choose a career in one of the design fields. I admire people like Charles Eames, Eileen Gray, and Phillipe Starck, among many other design heroes.

Here are three more design-oriented sites I visit regularly:

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/category/design/
http://just-good-design.com/
https://bauhaus-movement.tumblr.com/
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 26, 2018, 08:51:51 AM
Like that design forum, Hermes, pity it is only furniture - but "design" has so many aspects it might take a good slice of the web to cover it! I would want to push it beyond appreciation to technique, even the maths . . .

If I could live my life again, I would choose a career in one of the design fields. I admire people like Charles Eames, Eileen Gray, and Phillipe Starck, among many other design heroes.

Here are three more design-oriented sites I visit regularly:

http://www.thisiscolossal.com/category/design/
http://just-good-design.com/
https://bauhaus-movement.tumblr.com/

Thanks, Hernes! Bookmarked.

The art and design section of Geoff's bookshop is my most vidited area there. When I lived in or near London the Design Centre was a favourite.

Deeign is such a wide field and all areas, from microcircuits to megastructures, concept to concrete, have their own inherent beauty.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 27, 2018, 03:12:46 PM
Well, it's official. I need a lathe. The handle screws for that plane are Stanley's proprietary, oddball 12-20. Even the industrial supply houses don't carry anything that size. I mean, I could drill and tap to a larger size but that might weaken the handles, and I wouldn't have an excuse to buy some Big Iron that would be oh so useful in so many ways.

I have a line on an old Atlas that I could grab for cheap. Would need to verify what thread pitches it's capable of though. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 27, 2018, 04:03:39 PM
Well, it's official. I need a lathe. The handle screws for that plane are Stanley's proprietary, oddball 12-20. Even the industrial supply houses don't carry anything that size. I mean, I could drill and tap to a larger size but that might weaken the handles, and I wouldn't have an excuse to buy some Big Iron that would be oh so useful in so many ways.

I have a line on an old Atlas that I could grab for cheap. Would need to verify what thread pitches it's capable of though.

That's a bummer, after that work. But good excuse for a lathe! I was trmptedvto buy a small precision lathe but have no room for it. Bought one very, very small table top job (do 90% of my work) but it was so badly designed you could not  drill a small hole then swap to a larger one and move the tailstock back then recenter accurately to drill a larger one! They advertised it as a precision model maker's lathe. So it went back for a refund.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on February 28, 2018, 02:01:27 AM
JJ: almost any of the old Atlas lathes are capable of 20 TPI.  That is such a standard that almost any lathe with a set of change gears can accomplish. 8, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32,  common thread pitches in imperial standard. The little atlas will do those.  Trouble with an Atlas or its counterpart Craftsman, has bronze bushings in the head stock.  If you need to cut metrics....you are out of luck with the old lathes.  Some of the Atlas machines have been converted to Timkens by clever craftsmen of the  past.  The old bushing style head stock bearings leave some play in the head which will make big trouble when cutting threads.  The small South Bend lathes almost always had good ball or taper bearings where it counted...in the head stock.

You don't need a lathe for this job.  A number 12 has an outside diameter of 0.215.  You can enlarge the outer thread diameter to 0.246 which is only one thirty second larger.   Use a number 7 (0.201) drill to enlarge the hole.  If you do not have number drills, a 13/64 drill is within 2 thousandths of the right size tap drill.  Use your  ordinary quarter- twenty tap to fix the hole to the more common fastener size.  A one thirty second increase in hole size ain't likely to weaken the handle.  Do use some tapping fluid or at least some mineral spirits to lube the new tap thread while cutting it.

Number 12 or any other fastener, number, inch, or metric  size is easy enough to source.  The problem is that fastener suppliers will only sell you a box of 100 and you only need one of them.  Do the simple mod and don't look back.

If you already know all this stuff, which I expect that you might,  then forgive me for the presumptions.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 28, 2018, 03:21:50 AM
I might attempt that then Gene, if you think it'll work. My worry with enlarging the tapped holes is in having residual threads left from previous machining. I was thinking I'd have to go much larger than the existing hole size to clear new threads. I have a bucket's worth of taps lying around. Cleaned out an out of business hardware stores clearance sale. In taps I'm stocked as big as 3/4-10 and I'm pretty sure I have a complete set up to 1" in twist drills.

I do need either some larger tap wrenches or a set of tap sockets. Cleaning rusty holes with a big tap and a crescent wrench can be a bit unnerving. I find myself having to unfuck a lot of rusty junk that's past its prime.

I'd like a lathe though, but you're right about the atlas. Might be money ahead waiting for a good deal on a more substantial machine that was built for the long haul. There's a Clusing listed in Yorktown that I'd love to get my hands on. He has a South Bend 9A too. Of course, with a machine like that I'd have to take more precautions to keep my nephew and brother from using it and killing or maiming themselves. Long hair, long sleeves, and all that stuff scare the living daylights out of me around machinery.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on February 28, 2018, 05:21:01 AM
Well, it's official. I need a lathe. The handle screws for that plane are Stanley's proprietary, oddball 12-20. Even the industrial supply houses don't carry anything that size. I mean, I could drill and tap to a larger size but that might weaken the handles, and I wouldn't have an excuse to buy some Big Iron that would be oh so useful in so many ways.

I have a line on an old Atlas that I could grab for cheap. Would need to verify what thread pitches it's capable of though.

Nice excuse to get a lathe.  ;)
Or you could shell out an absurd amount of money for the genuine article (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Stanley-Plane-Toe-Tote-Screw-NOS-NEW-OLD-STOCK-/332461848664).
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 28, 2018, 05:25:35 AM
Well, it's official. I need a lathe. The handle screws for that plane are Stanley's proprietary, oddball 12-20. Even the industrial supply houses don't carry anything that size. I mean, I could drill and tap to a larger size but that might weaken the handles, and I wouldn't have an excuse to buy some Big Iron that would be oh so useful in so many ways.

I have a line on an old Atlas that I could grab for cheap. Would need to verify what thread pitches it's capable of though.

Nice excuse to get a lathe.  ;)
Or you could shell out an absurd amount of money for the genuine article (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Stanley-Plane-Toe-Tote-Screw-NOS-NEW-OLD-STOCK-/332461848664).

That doesn't look nearly long enough to even be a tote screw. Right size and pitch maybe, but it's more likely to be a frog adjustment screw. FleaBay can be downright ridiculous. I found a screwdriver listed for $250 a few months ago while researching a junk store purchase.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on February 28, 2018, 05:29:05 AM
Ah, well, perhaps this (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Record-Stanley-Plane-Rear-Handle-Fixing-Screw-Used-Later-Type/362183944666?_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIM.MBE%26ao%3D2%26asc%3D49923%26meid%3D41b3601586e641a296e34879bdf3e103%26pid%3D100005%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D321594618053%26itm%3D362183944666&_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851) or this (https://www.ebay.com/itm/Bench-Plane-Handle-Screw-Bolt-for-Stanley-Planes-4-1-4-New/321594618053?_trkparms=aid%3D444000%26algo%3DSOI.DEFAULT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D49923%26meid%3D91a95c7bb6474eb0bea82f61a8cda2ac%26pid%3D100752%26rk%3D2%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D332461848664%26itm%3D321594618053&_trksid=p2047675.c100752.m1982) is what you're looking for.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on February 28, 2018, 05:42:53 AM
Also Highland Woodworking sells handle screws: 4-3/8" long Rear Handle Screw (https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/rosewoodplanehandlesetreplacementrearhandlescrew.aspx)  2-5/8" long Front Knob Screw (https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/rosewoodplanehandlesetreplacmentfrontknobscrew.aspx)

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 28, 2018, 05:47:50 AM
Hmm... I doubt it's a Whitworth thread. It's a USA plane so I wouldn't expect a BSW thread but that wouldn't suprise me. The fog thickens because I can't tell using my thread gauges if it's a 60° V or 55°.  :-\
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 28, 2018, 05:49:39 AM
Big prices for not very big screws! Rarity is obviously a factor.

But re big prices, I have seen 2nd hsnd books advertised on Amazon for, say, £3 in UK and, say £150 in the US. Not $, £!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on February 28, 2018, 06:46:15 AM
Hmm... I doubt it's a Whitworth thread. It's a USA plane so I wouldn't expect a BSW thread but that wouldn't suprise me. The fog thickens because I can't tell using my thread gauges if it's a 60° V or 55°.  :-\

OK, I'm not a plane restorer, I just use whatever I can get my hands on, and usually it's modern planes with ugly plastic handles, though I did at one time have a few vintage items. Anyway, after looking around a bit, here's what I found (https://web.archive.org/web/20090114024938/http://www.geocities.com/plybench/tour.html#stanley_threads):

Quote
Many of the bolts and fixings on a Bailey Pattern plane are non standard (as far as normal engineering threads are concerned). 2 occasions where you might encounter this issue are replacing the oft-missing bolt at the toe of the tote (on #5 and bigger planes) and modifying the front knob (and its fixing bolt) to be of the "low knob" pattern.

If you measure the pitch of the thread, it looks like you're dealing with Whitworth/UNC ¼", since it's 20 TPI. But it's not ¼" OD; it's #12 size, or 0.216", a full 34 thou less (or 1/32" if you don't think in thous). Conversely, the standard UNC pitch for #12 rod is 24 TPI. This thread was never an engineering standard, just a Stanley plane standard.

So it looks like Stanley did use Whitworth, and the Highland Woodworking screws would work.

If you're interested in some history on this that I came across (which doesn't really answer the question): Stanley Planes and Screw Threads (http://www.tttg.org.au/Content/Stanley%20Planes%20and%20Screw%20Threads%20-%20Part%202.pdf)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 28, 2018, 06:59:15 AM
Who would hsve thought thst plane handle screws could generate such interest and research effort?!

 :grin:

[I do so wish that every keyboard had the interrobang - it seems tailor made for forum responses!]
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on February 28, 2018, 07:00:08 AM
That's fascinating. I love this stuff.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 28, 2018, 07:01:23 AM
That's fascinating. I love this stuff.
Any interesting screws that you need to research, Hermes?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on February 28, 2018, 07:03:53 AM
That's fascinating. I love this stuff.
Any interesting screws that you need to research, Hermes?

 ;) Oh, the stories I could tell you, but you're a bit young.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on February 28, 2018, 07:12:35 AM
I wish the whole world would just go metric. It would eliminate so many of these annoyances. Another irritation is the different electric plug standards in the world; one has enough other issues when travelling as much as I do.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 28, 2018, 07:40:24 AM
That's fascinating. I love this stuff.
Any interesting screws that you need to research, Hermes?

 ;) Oh, the stories I could tell you, but you're a bit young.

 :geezersay:

OK, Old Man.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on February 28, 2018, 08:47:14 AM
On the subject of interesting threads and screws, of the helical type, one of my favourites is the "Merton nut"

Quote
It consisted of a ‘chasing lathe’ by which he cut a secondary helix on the same cylinder with a tool mounted on a ‘Merton nut’ lined with strips of cork pressed upon the primary lathe-cut helix. Periodic errors were thus averaged and eliminated by the elasticity of the cork.
(Wiki)

Merton nuts use cork or felt or some other compressible/elastic material, soaked in a lubricant, that is in a housing that compresses it onto a helical thread. Correctly adjusted it is virtually "slop free" in all directions yet easy to turn.

A square thread form is best but it can still make an almost back-lash free adjuster using triangular ones. Obviously the greater the end load the longer the Merton nut needs to be, but in some cases the load actually works in your favour - providing the cork etc is well contained. I once made one out of hardwood for a quick and temporary prototype test rig. It actually lasted long enough to work out the theory was duff anyway . . .

Like several other things, including my own design high speed, just about constant volume/velocity/pressure (just a very fast, very small pressure spike) shiny, stainless steel and bronze change-over fluid media valve, it is one of the things I would have liked to have taken with me from work! Tried to get the boss interested in looking into a patent for that valve but he could not be bothered.

Added later:Just discovered that the life and writings of Thomas Merton are quite interesting - though some are a bit wooish.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on February 28, 2018, 11:58:23 AM
I wish the whole world would just go metric. It would eliminate so many of these annoyances. Another irritation is the different electric plug standards in the world; one has enough other issues when travelling as much as I do.

I agree the world should go metric, remember that space mishap?
Well no I don't remember it specifically but I know it happened.

I don't want any kilo-pascals in my tyres though, PSI till I die.

Grams are good, ounces are so antiquated probley >$30 now.
Humans are still measured in ' and " though.
TV/monitors are still a hold out.
I'm not sure what my shoe size is, it varies.
The standard "glass" of alcohol is miserly small.
Why is a sea X a bit bigger than a land x?


Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on March 06, 2018, 03:23:47 AM
As long as the tires are marked with both, I don't care, but it's somewhat troubling when the tires only have a psi rating and one is confronted with a pump that only displays kPa. OK, you can divide by 7 and add a few, but that's only a very rough approximation.

In Europe, at least on the continent, they seem to measure humans with the metric system, but for human weight in the UK it's still stones.

As for nautical miles and land miles, they have completely different origins (https://www.britannica.com/science/mile) and ideally the same word would never have been used, but that's the English for you. Fanshaw (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Featherstonhaugh)!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 07, 2018, 05:17:32 PM
Today's project was a chuck replacement on my drill. It's fairly new and very nice except for the factory chuck. Milwaukee decided to build a cordless drill that has enough power to dislocate your shoulder if you aren't bracing the side handle properly but cheapen out on the chuck. It's an all aluminum job with terrible runout and an annoying habit of letting go of large auger bits and hole saws....

Not only that but - getting back to the topic of odd thread pitches - they used a 9/16 thread to mount the chuck to the arbor instead of the ubiquitous 1/2. It was a challenge to find a high quality chuck that fit the drill but I did eventually find one made by Rohm. Then I had to find a distributor. Then I had to convince the distributor to sell me one single chuck when their minimum order was $500. Then the slick bastards had it drop shipped from Rohm. Pocketed to difference between wholesale and retail with a click of a mouse!

I'm happy though. Think I might go drill some four inch holes in irrigation pipe and see it this thing can flip me over. At least there's no cord to get tangled up in.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on March 08, 2018, 01:39:47 AM
Metaba also has some drills capable of dislocating a shoulder. I suspect that they have metric chuck threads. I do not own one of those but I have used one that is astoundingly  torque capable.  I have an ancient Milwaukee corded hammer drill that has been faithful for near 35 years. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on March 08, 2018, 07:01:04 AM
Not precisely apposite, but since drills came up I thought I'd mention a Canadian review channel on YouTube that I've found entertaining and sometimes educational. The fellow seems to have some engineering knowledge and he disassembles the items to examine their workings before he ever turns them on.

In the US and Canada there's a discount tool shop called Harbor Freight. Some of their items aren't too bad but you have to be picky and avoid their real junk, which plenty of it is. I could go on, but here's his review of their "Hercules" drill that they're promoting as a competitor to DeWalt.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 09, 2018, 02:49:24 PM
I like aVe, not so much for the technical stuff but his mangling of the English language is highly entertaining. He's a bit too much of a fanboy for Snap-On and Hilti. Both brands do produce excellent products but I don't find them to be a good value when you factor in the astronomical pricing schemes.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 09, 2018, 03:05:32 PM
I like aVe, not so much for the technical stuff but his mangling of the English language is highly entertaining. He's a bit too much of a fanboy for Snap-On and Hilti. Both brands do produce excellent products but I don't find them to be a good value when you factor in the astronomical pricing schemes.

First time I have seen the guy but, yes, he has an excellent command of Manglish! But, somehow, you know exactly what he means in the context. Might even adopt a few of his terms!

Just taken delivery of a new (cheapish at £230) digital 'scope, Hantek DSO5102P. Just getting my head around the functions and menus but not sure about the constant 2mV "grass" on the trace - it's on both channels even when I put a shorted plug in and does not alter with X or Y scaling. That makes it look like it is being introduced after all the signal processing  during or after the A-D stage. Seems to average 15MHz, way below the 100MHz bandwidth of the device.

Have sent an email to the seller (in China of course), nothing about this in the reviews. Although it is "fulfilled by Amazon" I have just noticed that returns have to be direct to China! I am not doing very low voltage stuff so may have to put up with it. The trace on my little, cheapo pocket 'scope is cleaner, but that has other bugs.

Otherwise the functions, menu system and the display of signal detail etc are very good.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 09, 2018, 04:16:32 PM
I looked at the Hantek scopes but the reviews were poor enough to steer me away. The hardware is apparently decent in within its limits but the software is reported to be real junk. I settled on a Pico 2204A and couldn't be happier. It's a bit more money and only two channels but works very well. I'm still accessorizin.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 09, 2018, 04:43:08 PM
I looked at the Hantek scopes but the reviews were poor enough to steer me away. The hardware is apparently decent in within its limits but the software is reported to be real junk. I settled on a Pico 2204A and couldn't be happier. It's a bit more money and only two channels but works very well. I'm still accessorizin.

The Amazon reviews over this side were OK, mostly 5* and the 4*s were minor things applicable to intended ussge. Basically I am doing low frequency digital hobby stuff so, assuming no gross  distortions, wave shape is unimportantish. Timing is a bit more critical though . . .
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 09, 2018, 04:53:46 PM
I like aVe, not so much for the technical stuff but his mangling of the English language is highly entertaining. He's a bit too much of a fanboy for Snap-On and Hilti. Both brands do produce excellent products but I don't find them to be a good value when you factor in the astronomical pricing schemes.

First time I have seen the guy but, yes, he has an excellent command of Manglish! But, somehow, you know exactly what he means in the context. Might even adopt a few of his terms!

Just taken delivery of a new (cheapish at £230) digital 'scope, Hantek DSO5102P. Just getting my head around the functions and menus but not sure about the constant 2mV "grass" on the trace - it's on both channels even when I put a shorted plug in and does not alter with X or Y scaling. That makes it look like it is being introduced after all the signal processing  during or after the A-D stage. Seems to average 15MHz, way below the 100MHz bandwidth of the device.

Have sent an email to the seller (in China of course), nothing about this in the reviews. Although it is "fulfilled by Amazon" I have just noticed that returns have to be direct to China! I am not doing very low voltage stuff so may have to put up with it. The trace on my little, cheapo pocket 'scope is cleaner, but that has other bugs.

Otherwise the functions, menu system and the display of signal detail etc are very good.

Is there a published signal to noise ratio spec on the instrument?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 09, 2018, 06:02:25 PM
I like aVe, not so much for the technical stuff but his mangling of the English language is highly entertaining. He's a bit too much of a fanboy for Snap-On and Hilti. Both brands do produce excellent products but I don't find them to be a good value when you factor in the astronomical pricing schemes.

First time I have seen the guy but, yes, he has an excellent command of Manglish! But, somehow, you know exactly what he means in the context. Might even adopt a few of his terms!

Just taken delivery of a new (cheapish at £230) digital 'scope, Hantek DSO5102P. Just getting my head around the functions and menus but not sure about the constant 2mV "grass" on the trace - it's on both channels even when I put a shorted plug in and does not alter with X or Y scaling. That makes it look like it is being introduced after all the signal processing  during or after the A-D stage. Seems to average 15MHz, way below the 100MHz bandwidth of the device.

Have sent an email to the seller (in China of course), nothing about this in the reviews. Although it is "fulfilled by Amazon" I have just noticed that returns have to be direct to China! I am not doing very low voltage stuff so may have to put up with it. The trace on my little, cheapo pocket 'scope is cleaner, but that has other bugs.

Otherwise the functions, menu system and the display of signal detail etc are very good.

Is there a published signal to noise ratio spec on the instrument?

Not that I can find. Have found a fairly comprehensive manual, with typical applications, in pdf form but no mention of signal:noise in the spec. I watched three video reviews on Youtube, by guys seemingly knowing what they were talking about, and not one commented abiut the fuzz - even the one who directly compared it to a Tektronix job (of which it is almost a copy). Learned a few other things, without recourse to the manual, but dearly want the graticule a bit brighter - you have to be at 90o to the screen and turn the turn the sun/light off!. Though all the important stuff, frequency, period, amplitude, rise time etc are, as with all digital scopes probably, available in real numbers. There are two frequency displays, one "hardware" and one "software" that never quite agree, but even the Tektronix had the same problem.

All three commenters gave it a thumbs up for the price.

So, perhaps I am just being fussy? Still too used to good old valve 'scopes (like the one in my attic that is probably a health hazard now!)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 09, 2018, 06:29:15 PM
Not that I can find. Have found a fairly comprehensive manual, with typical applications, in pdf form but no mention of signal:noise in the spec.

That's a pity, because it is an unambiguous test, which, if it fails, gives you good ammunition when you complain about the scope. On the other hand, unless you are measuring less that a few hundred millivolts, the noise you mention should not impact too much on the accuracy. A S/N ratio of at least 10:1 will ensure reasonable precision and repeatability.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 09, 2018, 06:39:33 PM
Not that I can find. Have found a fairly comprehensive manual, with typical applications, in pdf form but no mention of signal:noise in the spec.

That's a pity, because it is an unambiguous test, which, if it fails, gives you good ammunition when you complain about the scope. On the other hand, unless you are measuring less that a few hundred millivolts, the noise you mention should not impact too much on the accuracy. A S/N ratio of at least 10:1 will ensure reasonable precision and repeatability.

OK, I am just too fussy!

 :unsure:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 09, 2018, 09:23:56 PM
Ah, I didn't realize you bought the scope as a unit. I'm familiar with Hantek usb offerings. Makes much more sense now.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 09, 2018, 10:23:11 PM
Ah, I didn't realize you bought the scope as a unit. I'm familiar with Hantek usb offerings. Makes much more sense now.

Ah, didn't even know thst they did usb 'scopes!

Another bitch, can't get it working on W10 64bit.  Plug it in and my W10 tablet recognises it. Software apparently loads OK in the tablet. Does the software see the 'scope? Nope!

Try method two, dump data to USB drive. Scope says "Successfully downloaded".  But neither software nor Explorer can find the file . . .

Search the web and Youtube. Known issue, suggested that the driver is 32bit; 64bit drivers and hacks found for other models but not mine. Hantek website as much use as a chocolate crucible in a steelworks. Good thing I don't need to dump files for deep analysis and that my tablet takes adequate shots of the screen (if I lower the window blind and turn lights, and flash, off.) But it is also able to produce CSV files for matgematical analysis, if you could get it to actually cummunicate with the USB that is! It can, and does, store 'scope setups internally.

Just bloody annoying and not the first time Chinese software has not worked on W10.

Later:
 Have sent email to Hantek explaining the problem, saying that their site is of little use, asking for firmware/driver update downloads etc.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 10, 2018, 01:23:31 AM
Good luck Dave. If other's recent experience dealing with their 8 channel usb scopes are any indication you might be waiting a long, long time for any fixes....
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 10, 2018, 06:59:40 AM
Good luck Dave. If other's recent experience dealing with their 8 channel usb scopes are any indication you might be waiting a long, long time for any fixes....

Ans Hantek get a 1* review for fsulty kit and kack if servuce..
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 10, 2018, 07:24:47 AM
Good luck Dave. If other's recent experience dealing with their 8 channel usb scopes are any indication you might be waiting a long, long time for any fixes....

Ans Hantek get a 1* review for fsulty kit and kack if servuce..

Don't you mean cack?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 10, 2018, 07:43:15 AM
Good luck Dave. If other's recent experience dealing with their 8 channel usb scopes are any indication you might be waiting a long, long time for any fixes....

Ans Hantek get a 1* review for fsulty kit and kack if servuce..

Don't you mean cack?

"...lack of service"

Though "cack" might be appropriate in some respects.

Looks like I still need new glasses! Or to actually sit up at a desk with a stylus or use the Bluetooth keyboard to type instead of being a laid bsck couch slouch!. Or edit every thing twice . . . Thrice . . .


[Changed "potato" to "slouch" - more accurate and I like the rhyme!)]
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 22, 2018, 04:06:37 AM
Spent the evening sharpening chisels and cleaning up an old yankee screwdriver. Going to have a go at some small dovetail boxes here soon. A few saws need sharpening though.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 22, 2018, 04:37:08 AM
Spent the evening sharpening chisels and cleaning up an old yankee screwdriver. Going to have a go at some small dovetail boxes here soon. A few saws need sharpening though.

I wouldn't even dream of attempting dovetails. I am strictly a glue and screw woodworker.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 22, 2018, 04:45:31 AM
We'll see how they turn out. I imagine the final result will be rather rough.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 22, 2018, 04:48:50 AM
We'll see how they turn out. I imagine the final result will be rather rough.

We will need photos, please.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 22, 2018, 05:23:05 AM
Spent the evening sharpening chisels and cleaning up an old yankee screwdriver. Going to have a go at some small dovetail boxes here soon. A few saws need sharpening though.

Goodness, I have not taiked a dove since my school dsys - then it was only a single joint for practice. I am with Hermes, screw it, glue it!

I do keep my chisels good and shsrp though, have had a few locks to fit and have done the odd halving joint. I really love seeing excellent joinery though, it can be an artform.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on March 22, 2018, 12:44:54 PM
I wouldn't even dream of attempting dovetails. I am strictly a glue and screw woodworker.

Ye me too, though I don't usually bother with the glue.

Jesus though was a purist and shunned all fasteners as is shown in The Gospel According to the Son, kinda ironic really.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 22, 2018, 01:35:58 PM
We'll see how they turn out. I imagine the final result will be rather rough.

We will need photos, please.

When I get some progress y'all will be the first exhibition.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 22, 2018, 01:36:42 PM
Spent the evening sharpening chisels and cleaning up an old yankee screwdriver. Going to have a go at some small dovetail boxes here soon. A few saws need sharpening though.

Goodness, I have not taiked a dove since my school dsys - then it was only a single joint for practice. I am with Hermes, screw it, glue it!

I do keep my chisels good and shsrp though, have had a few locks to fit and have done the odd halving joint. I really love seeing excellent joinery though, it can be an artform.

I need some more tedium in my life.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on March 23, 2018, 01:20:55 AM
JJ i presume that you have a Japanese water stone and a good fixture to hold the sharpening angle with some degree of precision. A truly sharp plane iron or chisel is a delight to work with.  A not so sharp one is not fun to use.

You can use very fine grit wet-or-dry sandpaper as a reasonable substitute for the water stone. Not as good, but the results are OK.

One of the quickie sharpening tools that should be in every workshop is a smooth stick, like a paint stirring paddle, that has 400 to 600 wet-or- dry on one side and on the other side a strip of leather....flesh side out.  The leather to be oiled and infused with fine valve grinding compound.   A most useful and effective tool.  Cheap to make too.

The paint paddle is useful to tune up knife blades too.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 23, 2018, 01:39:26 AM
No water stones here. No jigs either. I have an ancient Carborundum stone in medium and very fine grits. The polish it produces is impressive for a crude implement. I also have a piece of Naugahyde that I've charged with green polishing compound. Its not leather but you work with what you got.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on March 23, 2018, 07:09:40 AM
Spent the evening sharpening chisels and cleaning up an old yankee screwdriver. Going to have a go at some small dovetail boxes here soon. A few saws need sharpening though.

I wouldn't even dream of attempting dovetails. I am strictly a glue and screw woodworker.
That was not an image I wanted!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 23, 2018, 07:15:37 AM
Spent the evening sharpening chisels and cleaning up an old yankee screwdriver. Going to have a go at some small dovetail boxes here soon. A few saws need sharpening though.

I wouldn't even dream of attempting dovetails. I am strictly a glue and screw woodworker.
That was not an image I wanted!

I stick to my lovers through thick and thin.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 23, 2018, 07:52:22 AM
If you want a sharp plane . . .

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 23, 2018, 08:51:11 AM
If you want a sharp plane . . .


That's incredible.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 27, 2018, 03:00:55 PM

 (https://youtu.be/qP1AmDRhoas)[/url]

I really like this guy. Hammering in the screws never occurred to me.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 27, 2018, 03:03:47 PM
If you want a sharp plane . . .


That's incredible.

I want one of those stick knives!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on March 27, 2018, 03:14:34 PM
If you have a YouTube video you want to post click the YouTube button and drop the URL between the tags like this:


[youtube]Youtube URL in Here[/youtube]
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 27, 2018, 04:27:51 PM
If you have a YouTube video you want to post click the YouTube button and drop the URL between the tags like this:


[youtube]Youtube URL in Here[/youtube]

Is this a change, Tank? Seemed to work just dtopping the link without tags. I seem to remember we had to use the tags then were told they were not necessary.

Signed
Confused of Gloucester
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on March 27, 2018, 04:51:14 PM

 (https://youtu.be/qP1AmDRhoas)[/url]

I really like this guy. Hammering in the screws never occurred to me.

What, you have never started a screw with a hammer? Actually I use a plastic faced mallet. In thiscoiuntry the hammer is often known as a "Birmingham screwdriver"!

Employed many of thosvrechniques but it takes a combination of hsving a good teacher, having an out of the box mind and, usually, lots of practice. My father used to shake his head at my methods of doing woodwork but they mostly did the job perfectly well. I learned about jigs and templates years ago and saved lots of time.

I also learned how to turn some small mistakes into desirable features!

Added later:

And having power tools is a big part of saving kabour and time. Cutting all that wood with a hand saw! Screwing all those screws by hand? Betcha he would be knackered and take two days or more without electricity.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on March 27, 2018, 05:39:21 PM
If you have a YouTube video you want to post click the YouTube button and drop the URL between the tags like this:


[youtube]Youtube URL in Here[/youtube]

Is this a change, Tank? Seemed to work just dtopping the link without tags. I seem to remember we had to use the tags then were told they were not necessary.

Signed
Confused of Gloucester
You can also just drop the link in to a post.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 28, 2018, 06:15:30 PM
If you have a YouTube video you want to post click the YouTube button and drop the URL between the tags like this:


[youtube]Youtube URL in Here[/youtube]

When I use the youtube tags this happens:

Not a valid youtube URL[/youtube]

Versus this with the link tags:
 (https://youtu.be/qP1AmDRhoas)[/url]

The urls are identical. Didn't know that a bare link would display as anything other than text though. I'll do that in the future.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 28, 2018, 06:26:08 PM

 (https://youtu.be/qP1AmDRhoas)[/url]

I really like this guy. Hammering in the screws never occurred to me.

What, you have never started a screw with a hammer? Actually I use a plastic faced mallet. In thiscoiuntry the hammer is often known as a "Birmingham screwdriver"!

Employed many of thosvrechniques but it takes a combination of hsving a good teacher, having an out of the box mind and, usually, lots of practice. My father used to shake his head at my methods of doing woodwork but they mostly did the job perfectly well. I learned about jigs and templates years ago and saved lots of time.

I also learned how to turn some small mistakes into desirable features!

Added later:

And having power tools is a big part of saving kabour and time. Cutting all that wood with a hand saw! Screwing all those screws by hand? Betcha he would be knackered and take two days or more without electricity.

Indeed I have not. Of course, I haven't spent much time on construction sites so my knowledge in that department is rather limited.

I do have some excellent news though. About a month ago I bought a new scan tool in anticipation of a job needing to read airbag faults. I was rather disappointed in it at first as the functionality for standard emissions diagnostics is rather limited. The refresh rate is slow and I still haven't figured out how to read fuel trims on the second bank of an engine...

But for antilock brakes and airbags it works very well! I hooked up, started entering the information and it was able to tell exactly the model and submodel without a lot of guesswork. The vin decoder actually worked. It connected to the airbag module very quickly and pulled all the information, even having accurate manufacturer specific definitions for the trouble codes.

Now I just have to fix the damn thing. If it's not just a wiring or connector issue I'll have to hunt through a few junkyards to find a replacement seat from a car that wasn't wrecked. I still don't have the capability to replace the bladder sensor and reprogram the system, but I'm getting there. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on March 28, 2018, 07:19:35 PM
Thanks jj I'll have a look.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 01, 2018, 05:05:54 PM
Well, the B&D Workmate is nowhere near heavy enough to function as a bench for woodworking and the bench vise on my bench in the shed doesn't work well at all either. So I guess I'm going to be scrounging for two by fours to make a laminate top and rig something up for legs.

I also need a proper vise which I can get delivered for about $20. It looks like the Workmate is going back to a dedicated grinder stand. I would just mount a woodworking vise to the heavier bench but I suspect my collection of rust and grease may not be conductive to furniture making either. Metal filings might cause issues as well.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on April 01, 2018, 06:23:25 PM
Well, the B&D Workmate is nowhere near heavy enough to function as a bench for woodworking and the bench vise on my bench in the shed doesn't work well at all either. So I guess I'm going to be scrounging for two by fours to make a laminate top and rig something up for legs.

I also need a proper vise which I can get delivered for about $20. It looks like the Workmate is going back to a dedicated grinder stand. I would just mount a woodworking vise to the heavier bench but I suspect my collection of rust and grease may not be conductive to furniture making either. Metal filings might cause issues as well.
That sort of thing was/is my problem - need a range of worshops for art/electronics, wordworking, mechanical stuff . . . Instead I hafe one sude of the living space and a very crowded attic with a Workmate wnd where I can't do hammering over a thin 1" nail! But screws are good, I sometimes have to have things in bits to get them down through the hatch!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 01, 2018, 06:28:34 PM
Whatever happened to the garage club Dave?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on April 01, 2018, 07:00:12 PM
Whatever happened to the garage club Dave?

Will have to think about that. It was bitterly cold when I went there, portable cabin balanced on railway sleepers in a field with no heating and no power other than an almost dead 2kW genny that they were building a "kennel" for so they could use it when it was raining. It was just enough to get the kettle going though the speed and output frequency/power dropped! The eight blokes there and the benches filled the place up. No where to keep projects being built, their "charity" work took priority, reasonably.

Also, at that time, I was having mobility problems. They had only recently moved in, maybe more organised now but it is not that secure and in an industrial zone known for vandalism and theft.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 04, 2018, 02:44:09 AM
(https://s7.postimg.org/jlg04k2nf/20180401_162016.jpg)

I've found a better way than sanding to remove ten years of weathering on the teak bench. I'll still have to sand into the corners but the majority is coming out rather nicely with a no. 4.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on April 04, 2018, 04:35:13 AM
(https://s7.postimg.org/jlg04k2nf/20180401_162016.jpg)

I've found a better way than sanding to remove ten years of weathering on the teak bench. I'll still have to sand into the corners but the majority is coming out rather nicely with a no. 4.

A thing of beauty is a joy forever. I get so much pleasure from looking at beautiful objects - I guess I am an inveterate materialist. Perhaps I should start a thread on physical things that move me, similar to the Music that moves me one?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 04, 2018, 05:16:20 AM
You should Hermes. I'd probably join in. The things that move me tend to be a bit... odd, at least by most people's standards, but I do enjoy looking at them.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on April 04, 2018, 06:16:55 AM
You should Hermes. I'd probably join in. The things that move me tend to be a bit... odd, at least by most people's standards, but I do enjoy looking at them.

I'll see later today. It will be quite a fruit salad of things I love, mainly by star designers, so maybe it will not go down too well.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on April 04, 2018, 06:52:26 AM
My fsther used to have a 1.5" bullnose plane that could get up to within 1/8th of an inch of a corner. It was not pretty and weighed a lot,  being a blacksmith he had made it himself. Along with the set of small to tiny "violin" type planes he had I have often wished that I had been able to inherit them.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 11, 2018, 12:37:18 AM
(https://s18.postimg.org/wju45x0yx/20180408_183627.jpg)

Bit more progress in the shop. We cleared a bunch of termite infested lumber out and built a floating bench, both to work on and to serve as temporary organization. We should have some pegboard by the end of the week, which will help a lot. Power should be run soon too.

This is what we pulled out. It was a full stack of poplar boards. Now it looks like fossilized life collected somewhere out west...

(https://s18.postimg.org/vhjxnk5cp/20180408_165617.jpg)

We really need a shop cat though. The mice have developed quite a nest in there. Maybe Bruno can find us one. Preferably an older tomcat, wiry and mean.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on April 11, 2018, 04:59:17 AM
(https://s18.postimg.org/wju45x0yx/20180408_183627.jpg)

Bit more progress in the shop. We cleared a bunch of termite infested lumber out and built a floating bench, both to work on and to serve as temporary organization. We should have some pegboard by the end of the week, which will help a lot. Power should be run soon too.

This is what we pulled out. It was a full stack of poplar boards. Now it looks like fossilized life collected somewhere out west...

(https://s18.postimg.org/vhjxnk5cp/20180408_165617.jpg)

We really need a shop cat though. The mice have developed quite a nest in there. Maybe Bruno can find us one. Preferably an older tomcat, wiry and mean.

This is so interesting, I wish I could sign up as a volunteer assistant. Keep the photos coming.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 11, 2018, 06:09:03 AM
Loving this jj, watching this progress.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 11, 2018, 02:14:11 PM
I think that today, aside from more general cleanup I'll try to work out a temporary foot to support the center section of the floating bench. Tying the three boards together will be easy enough but there needs to be a bit of support going to the ground as well. If I had a screw jack it'd be easy but either way it needs to avoid a permanent post so we have access to put in gravel for the floor. Concrete may wind up waiting a while.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on April 11, 2018, 02:38:21 PM
I think that today, aside from more general cleanup I'll try to work out a temporary foot to support the center section of the floating bench. Tying the three boards together will be easy enough but there needs to be a bit of support going to the ground as well. If I had a screw jack it'd be easy but either way it needs to avoid a permanent post so we have access to put in gravel for the floor. Concrete may wind up waiting a while.

Sounds like that ancient, but efficient, device - the wedge - could be employed here. Or a pair of them under an upright. With suitable foot and head plates that gives adjustment and a judiciously place screw or four will hold it all together.

Much under appreciated is the wedge, wasted just holding doors open. A friend, who's NGO work took him to rather rough areas, kept one in his suitcase for added security in hotels - kept the door closed a little longer in this case!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 11, 2018, 02:53:40 PM
Thanks Dave, in this modern world I tend to forget the simple solutions!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on April 11, 2018, 03:01:33 PM
Thanks Dave, in this modern world I tend to forget the simple solutions!

Got a collection of wedges of different sizes (mostly smallish ones in pairs), good for all kinds of things!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on April 12, 2018, 07:08:11 AM
I have a self made gadget for my table saw that will produce perfect wedges.  I use them plentifully in things like boat building. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 15, 2018, 06:42:32 PM
(https://s14.postimg.cc/5ctr7n6sx/20180415_113000.jpg)

New radiator goes in the big truck today. Two things I really wish we had. The first is concrete. The second is a pair of cable operated spring clamp pliers. There was serious consideration of cutting one clamp off with an angle grinder...

I was also suprised that the engine oil cooler is inside the radiator. That's just frickin' odd. Quick break for lunch now, toss the new radiator in and then we're off to pick up a fresh load of logs for the mill.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 15, 2018, 09:24:18 PM
Well, the new radiator is in, the system has been bled, and there were only two extra parts left over. Aside from a lengthy battle with one clamp it went fairly smoothly and, if I'm not mistaken, we beat the book time. Now to haul some cows once the logs are here...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 19, 2018, 10:53:46 PM
(https://s31.postimg.cc/77ty82oaj/20180418_162056.jpg)

I'm experimenting with spoon carving. Hopefully I can lay hands on some fresh pear from a downed tree this weekend. The two by four was proof of concept.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on April 20, 2018, 08:18:30 AM
(https://s31.postimg.cc/77ty82oaj/20180418_162056.jpg)

I'm experimenting with spoon carving. Hopefully I can lay hands on some fresh pear from a downed tree this weekend. The two by four was proof of concept.

That should be a satisfying project, with some sculptural possibilities. I like that square shape with rounded corners you've managed to get.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 20, 2018, 12:54:55 PM
Yeah, the pine I was trying the gouges on was tearing something fierce. Better, greener wood should cut more easily. I was going for an eliptical bowl but the corners wouldn't cooperate.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 25, 2018, 03:39:50 AM
I'm hoping to get to work on this tractor's charging system sometime in the near future. It's not quite as bad as it looks but... it'll still be a challenge. There's also a bit of work that needs doing with the transmission to get it working properly. For some reason it won't shift into low range. I suspect the neutral safety switch is corroded from water intrusion.

(https://s17.postimg.cc/fnh9n05wv/20180423_182647.jpg)

Having finally taken a look for myself it became immediately clear that my oldest brother had no idea of how a GM three wire alternator functions, much less how to properly retrofit the system. It also needs a new belt which might require pulling the hydraulic pump so I'll have to rig up some stands to support the engine and frame with the front axle pulled off. I'd like to roast the engineer who designed it that way. Still love that machine though.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 25, 2018, 02:45:37 PM
I had to fix a valve on my sprinkler system, it was a pain. First, I only noticed it wasn't working when I saw that half my front lawn was getting dry. The valves were buried so I had to dig them up before I could fiddle with them. After a good amount of prodding and turning a few things, it all seemed to work for almost two weeks. Then one night, they didn't turn off so I had to cut off the water to them. I checked everything leaving the only option being that I had to replace the valve itself. The the valves were placed too closely together to remove because I couldn't turn them. I didn't want to pull it all up and redo it correctly and the part that screwed into the pipes seemed fine, so I just replaced everything else and it seems to be working fine now. I guess I'll see in a few weeks.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 25, 2018, 03:53:06 PM
I had to fix a valve on my sprinkler system, it was a pain. First, I only noticed it wasn't working when I saw that half my front lawn was getting dry. The valves were buried so I had to dig them up before I could fiddle with them. After a good amount of prodding and turning a few things, it all seemed to work for almost two weeks. Then one night, they didn't turn off so I had to cut off the water to them. I checked everything leaving the only option being that I had to replace the valve itself. The the valves were placed too closely together to remove because I couldn't turn them. I didn't want to pull it all up and redo it correctly and the part that screwed into the pipes seemed fine, so I just replaced everything else and it seems to be working fine now. I guess I'll see in a few weeks.

Can you replace just the solenoid? I'm not terribly familiar with sprinkler systems but if it's a two piece valve assembly and you can get the parts it might be worth a shot. I'd check to see if it was a power issue first but if you're getting power to the valve when you're supposed to it could be a sticking solenoid that's causing the problem.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 25, 2018, 04:04:36 PM
I had to fix a valve on my sprinkler system, it was a pain. First, I only noticed it wasn't working when I saw that half my front lawn was getting dry. The valves were buried so I had to dig them up before I could fiddle with them. After a good amount of prodding and turning a few things, it all seemed to work for almost two weeks. Then one night, they didn't turn off so I had to cut off the water to them. I checked everything leaving the only option being that I had to replace the valve itself. The the valves were placed too closely together to remove because I couldn't turn them. I didn't want to pull it all up and redo it correctly and the part that screwed into the pipes seemed fine, so I just replaced everything else and it seems to be working fine now. I guess I'll see in a few weeks.

Can you replace just the solenoid? I'm not terribly familiar with sprinkler systems but if it's a two piece valve assembly and you can get the parts it might be worth a shot. I'd check to see if it was a power issue first but if you're getting power to the valve when you're supposed to it could be a sticking solenoid that's causing the problem.
The solenoid was not the problem, it still worked. I swapped it with another valve that I knew was working fine and put the one that was working fine onto the broken one. The broken one was still broken 8 out of 10 times, the working one still worked 10 out of 10 times. On top of not being able to see any problems with the electricity. That was before the valve just stayed on when it should have shut off.

When I replaced everything, I found that there was a hole in a rubber part under the solenoid, which is what made the sprinklers stay on. A small hole in it is probably what kept it somewhat working after I fiddled with it and it probably just got worse and worse. I'm pretty sure that was the problem, because the new valve rubber thing doesn't have the hole. Tested it and it now worked 10 out of 10 times, and even when the timer was going it worked as it should have. Also, no leaking from the valves so I'm pretty sure it's alright, but I'm going to keep an eye on it for a while.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 30, 2018, 05:18:11 PM
My GF and I made a retaining wall for some plants to go into in the front of our house.

(https://i.imgur.com/CULMHqz.jpg)

We still have to cut and fit the top row, but we need to get a saw for that first. We're also thinking of putting in another row to make it a bit taller.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on April 30, 2018, 05:30:30 PM
Do you have a "damp proof course" in your house construction? Or some other rising damp barrier system?

That soil would be too high for our UK building standards without extra measures.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 30, 2018, 07:39:42 PM
Any pooling will drain out the sides, and the walls are already set up well. I think all that's there is going to be overkill for a desert.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on April 30, 2018, 08:57:46 PM
Any pooling will drain out the sides, and the walls are already set up well. I think all that's there is going to be overkill for a desert.

Hmm, was not thinking about pooling, more seeping. If damp earth is in contact with the wall above the dpc moisture will gradually soak through the wall. Not so bad for cavity walls with injected foam insulation but with insulation that wicks moisture it may cross the cavity. With no insulation internal evaporation/condensation can also transfer moisture iver the cavity.

Not a builder but have experience of helping to fix this problem, by removing the offending soil/rubbish and/or cutting slots in the mortar and inserting interbrick ventilators.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 30, 2018, 09:09:45 PM
Any pooling will drain out the sides, and the walls are already set up well. I think all that's there is going to be overkill for a desert.

Hmm, was not thinking about pooling, more seeping. If damp earth is in contact with the wall above the dpc moisture will gradually soak through the wall. Not so bad for cavity walls with injected foam insulation but with insulation that wicks moisture it may cross the cavity. With no insulation internal evaporation/condensation can also transfer moisture iver the cavity.

Not a builder but have experience of helping to fix this problem, by removing the offending soil/rubbish and/or cutting slots in the mortar and inserting interbrick ventilators.
The walls are already set up with insulation, that is what I meant by the walls being set up well. And the soil doesn't stay very moist, it is a desert. That's why I think what is there is overkill.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on May 01, 2018, 10:32:45 AM
Are termites an issue in your area?
I certainly couldn't do anything like that.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on May 01, 2018, 03:34:58 PM
Termites are an issue. Most of the house is brick though, so it's not easy for them. Even still, they will come around every five to ten years and need to be killed off as soon as we see any sign of them. Preventing them is possible, but expensive. If you catch them soon enough then they don't cause much damage. So we get someone out to inspect the house for them every once in a while.

I was thinking about this from Dave yesterday. When we put in the weed preventing layer after we section off the dirt sections, do you think that will not be enough protection? I mean, there are some places where you might want it to be water proof, but in a desert, I don't think we'll need more than what we have.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 01, 2018, 04:25:20 PM
I was thinking about this from Dave yesterday. When we put in the weed preventing layer after we section off the dirt sections, do you think that will not be enough protection? I mean, there are some places where you might want it to be water proof, but in a desert, I don't think we'll need more than what we have.

True, the desert enviroment is a plus factor in precenting moisture build-up!

Weed prevention fabrics are usually a weave, let water through but not weeds, so not a lot of good for waterproofing. The guy that owns downstairs stripped the garden, laid a weed precentiin fabric over that and gravelled the whole thing. He was renting it and knew most tenants would not maintain a normal garden. He was surprised, and pissed off, to find weeds growing three years later. I had to explain that wind blown dust, leaves and other organic stuff builds a layer on top of the membrane, between the stones. Weeds get a start in this and then send very fine roots down through the mesh of the membrane. Only giving the area a dose of persistent weedkiller every year or two works. Unless you want to manually pull up every green shoot before it get established. Or strip the gracel and vacuum up the detritus.

 He threatened to concrete or pave the whole thing!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on May 01, 2018, 05:11:51 PM
Weeds generate way more seeds than other plants. In general. And the wind and animals help them spread. Protecting things from underneath helps, but that's not going to let anyone forget about it for a year and expect no weeds. Even with concrete, the weeds will probably find a way into the concrete eventually.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 01, 2018, 05:54:04 PM
Weeds generate way more seeds than other plants. In general. And the wind and animals help them spread. Protecting things from underneath helps, but that's not going to let anyone forget about it for a year and expect no weeds. Even with concrete, the weeds will probably find a way into the concrete eventually.
Make the concrete too thin and mushrooms can break it from under!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 01, 2018, 07:15:55 PM
I don't know much about desert soil conditions but you might be surprised by just how damp the soil is underneath if you water the plants. You're creating a small artificial biome right next to your house. Might be dry, but then again it might not be.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on May 01, 2018, 08:56:47 PM
With all the digging I've done over the year, I'd be surprised if I didn't know what the soil was like throughout the year at various spots around my yard. Especially with the 0-2" of dirt that will be above the foundation.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 02, 2018, 03:37:34 AM
I know I'm getting blind as a bat but it looks like you have one full course of blocks above the slab already and are planning on another by your original post. Unless you're not planning on adding much dirt for the wall to retain you'll be above the slab by more than two inches. 

I would also point out that, in my experience, landscaping tends to trap moisture much more than a graded yard. This is especially true when beds contain more organic matter than the surrounding soil. Weed barriers add to the moisture content as well.

Also, now that I've read back through, to cut the block you might think about a cheap angle grinder from Harbor Freight and a few masonry wheels. Score the cut line and smack that bad boy with a hammer.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on May 02, 2018, 11:22:40 AM
Termites are an issue. Most of the house is brick though, so it's not easy for them. Even still, they will come around every five to ten years and need to be killed off as soon as we see any sign of them. Preventing them is possible, but expensive. If you catch them soon enough then they don't cause much damage. So we get someone out to inspect the house for them every once in a while.

I was thinking about this from Dave yesterday. When we put in the weed preventing layer after we section off the dirt sections, do you think that will not be enough protection? I mean, there are some places where you might want it to be water proof, but in a desert, I don't think we'll need more than what we have.

You can get this sort of stuff:

acrylic polymer-based liquid which upon curing forms a seamless, flexible, Termite resistant and waterproof membrane. Containing the active control agent Bifenthrin, this agent is modelled on Mother Nature's own insecticide pyrethrum (extracted from the pyrethrum daisy) which kills and repels Termites.
 (http://www.termseal.com.au/multipurpose-backfilled-wall-protection.php)

Can't say how effective it is.


Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on May 02, 2018, 02:26:39 PM
I know I'm getting blind as a bat but it looks like you have one full course of blocks above the slab already and are planning on another by your original post. Unless you're not planning on adding much dirt for the wall to retain you'll be above the slab by more than two inches.
You'll have to look again then. As it is right now if we fill in with dirt, it will be about 1-3" below the foundation, if we do another row, it will be about 0-2" at most above the foundation. If you're going off of the slab for the porch, then that could be why you're missing it, that is below the foundation slab.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on May 02, 2018, 02:29:14 PM
Termites are an issue. Most of the house is brick though, so it's not easy for them. Even still, they will come around every five to ten years and need to be killed off as soon as we see any sign of them. Preventing them is possible, but expensive. If you catch them soon enough then they don't cause much damage. So we get someone out to inspect the house for them every once in a while.

I was thinking about this from Dave yesterday. When we put in the weed preventing layer after we section off the dirt sections, do you think that will not be enough protection? I mean, there are some places where you might want it to be water proof, but in a desert, I don't think we'll need more than what we have.

You can get this sort of stuff:

acrylic polymer-based liquid which upon curing forms a seamless, flexible, Termite resistant and waterproof membrane. Containing the active control agent Bifenthrin, this agent is modelled on Mother Nature's own insecticide pyrethrum (extracted from the pyrethrum daisy) which kills and repels Termites.
 (http://www.termseal.com.au/multipurpose-backfilled-wall-protection.php)

Can't say how effective it is.
Thanks, but that's going to be overkill. I don't think we'll more than what we've already got and planned.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on May 02, 2018, 08:28:28 PM
Termites are an issue. Most of the house is brick though, so it's not easy for them. Even still, they will come around every five to ten years and need to be killed off as soon as we see any sign of them. Preventing them is possible, but expensive. If you catch them soon enough then they don't cause much damage. So we get someone out to inspect the house for them every once in a while.

I was thinking about this from Dave yesterday. When we put in the weed preventing layer after we section off the dirt sections, do you think that will not be enough protection? I mean, there are some places where you might want it to be water proof, but in a desert, I don't think we'll need more than what we have.

You can get this sort of stuff:

acrylic polymer-based liquid which upon curing forms a seamless, flexible, Termite resistant and waterproof membrane. Containing the active control agent Bifenthrin, this agent is modelled on Mother Nature's own insecticide pyrethrum (extracted from the pyrethrum daisy) which kills and repels Termites.
 (http://www.termseal.com.au/multipurpose-backfilled-wall-protection.php)

Can't say how effective it is.

Interesting stuff--I'll have to keep it in mind for future applications. Thanks, Bad Penny II.  :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 08, 2018, 02:14:47 AM
We got the deck on the hay wagon last Sunday. I didn't have the chance to clean it up and give it a fresh coat of paint but it doesn't look too bad. We have another one to pull out so maybe I can do that one right. Will have to remove the tree that decided to grow right through the wagon...

(https://s18.postimg.cc/62e8xkbc9/DSC_0077.jpg)

The deck and backboard are close to square in reality. The left rear tire was shredded so it's sitting off in that photo. For the other one I intend to knock all the rust off, paint the frame and wheels, and use better wood for the deck along with some weather treatment for the boards.

There's a gravity wagon that needs some work too but that'll have to wait a while. The Massey Ferguson needs some immediate repairs to pull the big hay cutter and new ground disk, and the big truck is running dangerously low oil pressure, according to the gauge. The spec is forty PSI, and on a cold start it doesn't clear twenty. Once the engine is warm it falls to ten. I hope that the actual oil pressure is fine and that the sending unit is sending bad data - the gauge has periodically dropped to zero for some time, despite the truck obviously having at least some oil pressure.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 08, 2018, 02:12:42 PM
You are one busy little beaver!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 08, 2018, 02:40:20 PM
Not quite busy enough to keep up with everything. I just found out last night that one of our balers needs work done to have it back in service by Thursday. So my day off tomorrow is completely spoken for.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on May 09, 2018, 02:04:29 AM
Splice a separate oil pressure gage into the circuit JJ.  If the pressure is actually as low as you mention, the engine ain't long for this world..........Rods, main, cam shaft, and maybe the oil pump itself is in danger of self destructing............But I think that you know all that.  Good luck with the project.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 09, 2018, 03:21:54 AM
A separate gauge isn't really practical on this engine. The GM 6.0 sending unit is tucked behind the intake manifold with very little clearance for the wiring haness, much less adapter fittings and the sending unit cobbled on top. Best case scenario is that the unit is sending bad data to the ecu. Worst case is that there's a serious problem that needs to be addressed.

Heck, I might even be able to get the truck cheap if that's the case. I can probably find an engine pretty cheap to throw in it if the original is too far gone for a rebuild. Once the power train is in working condition all's I'd have to do is replace the rockers and cab corners, do a quick paint job, bit of front end work, fab up a flatbed to replace the damaged pickup bed that's on it, service the ac system so it blows cold again, and give the interior a thorough cleaning. That'd make for a decent truck...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 15, 2018, 12:45:42 AM
I bought a new set of manifold gauges and decided to check and see why the ac doesn't work in my car. I was hoping for a low pressure switch or something equally simple. Nope, there is a leak and no refrigerant is left in the system!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on May 15, 2018, 03:18:20 AM
I bought a new set of manifold gauges and decided to check and see why the ac doesn't work in my car. I was hoping for a low pressure switch or something equally simple. Nope, there is a leak and no refrigerant is left in the system!

My Dad and I can never get those things refilled with freon. I don't know what it is. We do it all correctly but no matter what car we do it on it doesn't work. I almost wonder if we need to have the car running and the fans running to refill it. :chin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 15, 2018, 12:49:11 PM
I bought a new set of manifold gauges and decided to check and see why the ac doesn't work in my car. I was hoping for a low pressure switch or something equally simple. Nope, there is a leak and no refrigerant is left in the system!

My Dad and I can never get those things refilled with freon. I don't know what it is. We do it all correctly but no matter what car we do it on it doesn't work. I almost wonder if we need to have the car running and the fans running to refill it. :chin:

It helps. Fill from the low side and the lower relative pressure with the compressor running helps pull the refrigerant in. Gauges help too, but it's best to fill a system with the chare removed completely so you don't overcharge the system and cause damage. I'm not a fan of the part store kits. Often it's not a lack of refrigerant that's causing the ac not to work.

Never, never never fill from the high side with the ac running.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on May 15, 2018, 03:49:23 PM
I bought a new set of manifold gauges and decided to check and see why the ac doesn't work in my car. I was hoping for a low pressure switch or something equally simple. Nope, there is a leak and no refrigerant is left in the system!

My Dad and I can never get those things refilled with freon. I don't know what it is. We do it all correctly but no matter what car we do it on it doesn't work. I almost wonder if we need to have the car running and the fans running to refill it. :chin:

It helps. Fill from the low side and the lower relative pressure with the compressor running helps pull the refrigerant in. Gauges help too, but it's best to fill a system with the chare removed completely so you don't overcharge the system and cause damage. I'm not a fan of the part store kits. Often it's not a lack of refrigerant that's causing the ac not to work.

Never, never never fill from the high side with the ac running.

Chare?

But yeah these happen with multiple vehicles that we have or have had. I always did my own work on my car and so has my father. Only one time we did not was when it was literally impossible to retime the engine and put the belt on ourselves. The guy also recharged the freon by request and we asked how he did it and we had the standard answer that he just puts the cap on the charger and pulls the trigger on the canister. I knew that was wrong so he could pull us back in for more money but still, that's what we were doing the whole time.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 16, 2018, 03:31:44 AM
I missed the 'g' in charge. The problem with the kit cans is that you really don't have any way to know how much refrigerant is already in the system. This can be a problem, especially when your ac is properly filled and something else - like a bad compressor clutch, compressor, or low pressure switch - is causing the warm air. You also don't know how much you are adding without breaking out a set of scales.

Manifold gauges are cheap and can give you direction to actually fix the problem instead of just dumping refrigerant in and hoping you get cold air.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on May 16, 2018, 04:29:25 AM
I missed the 'g' in charge. The problem with the kit cans is that you really don't have any way to know how much refrigerant is already in the system. This can be a problem, especially when your ac is properly filled and something else - like a bad compressor clutch, compressor, or low pressure switch - is causing the warm air. You also don't know how much you are adding without breaking out a set of scales.

Manifold gauges are cheap and can give you direction to actually fix the problem instead of just dumping refrigerant in and hoping you get cold air.

I think the can he has has a gauge on it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 16, 2018, 05:39:56 AM
A gauge, yes. But actually diagnosing the problem requires looking at pressure on both sides of the system. Plus, you still don't know what the total charge weight is. Too much refrigerant can damage an ac system.

People buy those can kits all the time thinking it's a magic solution to hot air. There's a lot more going on that needs to be accounted for than the amount of refrigerant in the system.

That's not to say the kits never work, of course. Their efficacy is limited to a specific situation though. If there's a clog in the system or anything else is wrong you can buy those kits all day and never get cold air. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on May 16, 2018, 09:29:46 PM
A gauge, yes. But actually diagnosing the problem requires looking at pressure on both sides of the system. Plus, you still don't know what the total charge weight is. Too much refrigerant can damage an ac system.

People buy those can kits all the time thinking it's a magic solution to hot air. There's a lot more going on that needs to be accounted for than the amount of refrigerant in the system.

That's not to say the kits never work, of course. Their efficacy is limited to a specific situation though. If there's a clog in the system or anything else is wrong you can buy those kits all day and never get cold air.

I'll relay the information to him then. See what he thinks. He might know something that he is not telling me.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 18, 2018, 02:52:55 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 05:17:57 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 18, 2018, 05:33:48 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 06:11:47 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 18, 2018, 06:46:51 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.

Yeah, 'cos along came the "Awful Eightiies" followed the "Nasty Nineties", the "Naff Noughties" and now the "Terrible Teenies"

Sorry, wrong thread!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Magdalena on May 18, 2018, 07:26:02 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.

Yeah, 'cos along came the "Awful Eightiies" followed the "Nasty Nineties", the "Naff Noughties" and now the "Terrible Teenies"

Sorry, wrong thread!

 :notsure:
Yeah...I think you're looking for the, "GOOF" Member's Club  - "Grumpy Order of Old Farts". They're in the Reasons To Be Grumpy thread. I believe today is their first meeting.
 :grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 18, 2018, 09:58:11 AM
kj
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.

Yeah, 'cos along came the "Awful Eightiies" followed the "Nasty Nineties", the "Naff Noughties" and now the "Terrible Teenies"

Sorry, wrong thread!

 :notsure:
Yeah...I think you're looking for the, "GOOF" Member's Club  - "Grumpy Order of Old Farts". They're in the Reasons To Be Grumpy thread. I believe today is their first meeting.
 :grin:

"Any collection, meeting, assembly or congregation of GOOF members shall be known as a Grump."
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Arturo on May 18, 2018, 11:56:05 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.

Yeah, 'cos along came the "Awful Eightiies" followed the "Nasty Nineties", the "Naff Noughties" and now the "Terrible Teenies"

Sorry, wrong thread!

 :notsure:
Yeah...I think you're looking for the, "GOOF" Member's Club  - "Grumpy Order of Old Farts". They're in the Reasons To Be Grumpy thread. I believe today is their first meeting.
 :grin:

I noticed you weren't in there Mags. Interesting... :)

(https://i.imgur.com/14V5Rj4.png)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 19, 2018, 01:28:48 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Tonight I get to suffer installing the new sending unit. In. The. Rain.

We HAVE to get power at the shop!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 20, 2018, 02:27:01 PM
This is probably an old one - but new to me when I "invented" it this morning.

Needed to get a piece of 25 x 35 x 3mm thick steel clamped pretty flush with the top of my drill vice jaws for marking and drilling. Discovered best way was to put the piece on a flat clean surface, put the opened vice over it upside-down, then tighten. Within normal workshop limits, including the slightly scratched vice jaws, it worked well. Marked, drilled and tapped.

Then I gave up for the day 'cos the attic had hit about 35 in the sun!

All this for a bodge to save someone a mere £150 for a new oven door! OK, she has just been sacked . . .
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on May 20, 2018, 02:52:37 PM
This is probably an old one - but new to me when I "invented" it this morning.

Needed to get a piece of 25 x 35 x 3mm thick steel clamped pretty flush with the top of my drill vice jaws for marking and drilling. Discovered best way was to put the piece on a flat clean surface, put the opened vice over it upside-down, then tighten. Within normal workshop limits, including the slightly scratched vice jaws, it worked well. Marked, drilled and tapped.

Then I gave up for the day 'cos the attic had hit about 35 in the sun!

All this for a bodge to save someone a mere £150 for a new oven door! OK, she has just been sacked . . .

Pardon my high density, but I didn't get that description. It sounds interesting, so I would appreciate a bit more explanation.  :query:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 20, 2018, 03:12:20 PM
This is probably an old one - but new to me when I "invented" it this morning.

Needed to get a piece of 25 x 35 x 3mm thick steel clamped pretty flush with the top of my drill vice jaws for marking and drilling. Discovered best way was to put the piece on a flat clean surface, put the opened vice over it upside-down, then tighten. Within normal workshop limits, including the slightly scratched vice jaws, it worked well. Marked, drilled and tapped.

Then I gave up for the day 'cos the attic had hit about 35 in the sun!

All this for a bodge to save someone a mere £150 for a new oven door! OK, she has just been sacked . . .

Pardon my high density, but I didn't get that description. It sounds interesting, so I would appreciate a bit more explanation.  :query:

Um, well, er, can be fiddly trying to get a piece of material into a drill vice with the top surface dead flush with the top of the vice jaws for marking etc. Inverting the vice on a flat surface over the piece means that the vice and piece surfaces in contact with the fkat surface are, er, all at the same kevel. Sort of.

Thinking afterwards I used to do something similar by  just "nipping" the work piece slightly proud in the vice, placing something flat on it the tappint it down.  But, sometimes, the "nip" is not perfect and the piece shifts. With today's method I could tighten right up straight away.

If you want the surface of the piece slightly proud, for filing or even milling, say, without danger to the vice, you put suitably thick spacers under the vice jaw tops only. Then, when you lift the vice right side up the piece is ready for working on.

I was using my "precision" drill vice and try to preserve the surfaces on that - can't take it to work for a light skim on a mill any more, I trued up all the sides before leaving work. How I miss access to a proper machine shop!

Is there a way to get our own short videos up here without involving Youtube!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on May 20, 2018, 03:32:14 PM
This is probably an old one - but new to me when I "invented" it this morning.

Needed to get a piece of 25 x 35 x 3mm thick steel clamped pretty flush with the top of my drill vice jaws for marking and drilling. Discovered best way was to put the piece on a flat clean surface, put the opened vice over it upside-down, then tighten. Within normal workshop limits, including the slightly scratched vice jaws, it worked well. Marked, drilled and tapped.

Then I gave up for the day 'cos the attic had hit about 35 in the sun!

All this for a bodge to save someone a mere £150 for a new oven door! OK, she has just been sacked . . .

Pardon my high density, but I didn't get that description. It sounds interesting, so I would appreciate a bit more explanation.  :query:

Um, well, er, can be fiddly trying to get a piece of material into a drill vice with the top surface dead flush with the top of the vice jaws for marking etc. Inverting the vice on a flat surface over the piece means that the vice and piece surfaces in contact with the fkat surface are, er, all at the same kevel. Sort of.

Thinking afterwards I used to do something similar by  just "nipping" the work piece slightly proud in the vice, placing something flat on it the tappint it down.  But, sometimes, the "nip" is not perfect and the piece shifts. With today's method I could tighten right up straight away.

If you want the surface of the piece slightly proud, for filing or even milling, say, without danger to the vice, you put suitably thick spacers under the vice jaw tops only. Then, when you lift the vice right side up the piece is ready for working on.

I was using my "precision" drill vice and try to preserve the surfaces on that - can't take it to work for a light skim on a mill any more, I trued up all the sides before leaving work. How I miss access to a proper machine shop!

Is there a way to get our own short videos up here without involving Youtube!

Thanks Dave, now I get it. Yes, it would be useful if we could post videos without Youtube. I once tried with Imgur, but failed.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 20, 2018, 04:10:15 PM
Why did you need to do the layout in the vise? I would've marked and center punched, then drilled and tapped at my convenience. Cheap twist drills make for decent round parallels if you snap the fluted portion off.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 20, 2018, 04:51:05 PM
Why did you need to do the layout in the vise? I would've marked and center punched, then drilled and tapped at my convenience. Cheap twist drills make for decent round parallels if you snap the fluted portion off.
  Ah, well, I am a bit fumbly in my dotage and like to have things as steady as possible. Wanted 4 holes in that little bit, fairly precisely. Find holding a 6" rule steady on a shiny/slippery little bit of steel whilst scribing not so easy these days. OK, I had to take it out for centre punching then put it back in. I have been known to clamp a rule down then use a jeweller's loupe, with a very fine centre punch and small hammer, to get best precision! Follow up with the big punch later. On silver eork I would, if possible, glue the workpiece to something for marking up. Had to be a soluble glue, in some sirt of solvent, of course . . . Reduced the chance of a slip and a scratch.

Yes, have often used drills shanks for spacers, though the shank is not always precisely the same size as the actual stated cutting size (a 3mm rod is a very tight fit in a 3mm hole, goes in with a big enough hammer behind it and maybe a torch to warm up the outside!) but I am not working to microns as I did at work, half a millimeter is usually close enough for my current definition of high precision!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 23, 2018, 03:50:55 AM
There's a big honking hole in the condenser return line for my car's ac system. I have some epoxy setting up, just so I can charge the system enough to test the compressor. If the compressor turns in I'll be in fairly good shape once I get a vacuum pump to finish the job properly.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 23, 2018, 06:23:58 AM
There's a big honking hole in the condenser return line for my car's ac system. I have some epoxy setting up, just so I can charge the system enough to test the compressor. If the compressor turns in I'll be in fairly good shape once I get a vacuum pump to finish the job properly.
At least you found the problem.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 23, 2018, 06:54:13 AM
There's a big honking hole in the condenser return line for my car's ac system. I have some epoxy setting up, just so I can charge the system enough to test the compressor. If the compressor turns in I'll be in fairly good shape once I get a vacuum pump to finish the job properly.
At least you found the problem.

I am so glad that the ac in my shopping trolley is of the Peltier type, no fluids or gases!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 23, 2018, 01:36:40 PM
There's a big honking hole in the condenser return line for my car's ac system. I have some epoxy setting up, just so I can charge the system enough to test the compressor. If the compressor turns in I'll be in fairly good shape once I get a vacuum pump to finish the job properly.
At least you found the problem.

I found one pRobles but with the way my luck runs it's probably not the only thing wrong.  *sigh*
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 26, 2018, 04:16:43 PM
It's nice when a plan comes together . . .

Friend's daughter has not been able to use her main oven for weeks, one of the bits that holds the glass front on had broken off. My friend told her to contact me but she it too indipendent. But I did have to get her old printer linked up with the lnewer laptop I gave her - the driver disk she had eould not work on Windows 10 (yes, the printer is that old!)

Managed to find a driver to download and got the thing going, 'cept the ink cartridges/heads had dried out. Measured up tge oven door and had a good think. Should have brought it home eith me then. Anyway, drilled and tapped a bit of 25mm steel bar and shaped a bit of al.al. as the "shelf/hook" the glass sits on.

Today I picked the door up (the daughter had fallen and severely banged her head and could not drive) and took it up into the workshop. I had got 97% of it right, just needed a little cosmetic tweaking. Undoing the screw quarter of an inch (it's an inch long) allows the support bit to seing out of the way.

Nice to know the noddle and its noodles are still working OK!

But I cannot quite understand why the glass door front does not hook onto the steel frame so it hangs there and the bottom bits just stop it swinging out. It hooks under the frame so if the supports fail it falls straight down. The supports can be no more than about 1,5mm thick to clear the main part of the oven.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 26, 2018, 09:11:00 PM
They want to sell repair parts!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 26, 2018, 09:42:37 PM
They want to sell repair parts!
It is also dangeroyu! You have to remove the front glass to clean between them thst andvthe inner glass. This requires holding a heavy sheetbof tempered glass up whiost undoing two screws on the bottom edge of the door. Then, of course, holding it up whilst trying to get the screws lined up in two holes to re-assemble. It is carefully designed that you can easily get the two 0.5mm thick stainless steel securing tabs on the outside instead of the inside of the door bottom if you do not note how they came out (or are not engineering minded). This puts forces on those tabs that tend to cause them to rip off the door.

A replacement glass is £152, a whole new main oven insert, with door, is £270. Unfortunately the lady is between employments.

My oven door stays in place and four screws/plates secure the inner glass to the door frame. Simply remove the screws, lift off a smallish sheet of glass, clean all surfaces and re-assemple. Simples. Takes fifteen minutes or less, no danger to knees or feet, little to the glass - but I have to sit down to do the job these days . . .

Been promised a bottle of vino as payment!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 26, 2018, 09:56:42 PM
How are your ovens built? Seems overly complicated.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 26, 2018, 10:18:12 PM
How are your ovens built? Seems overly complicated.

I think it is a German oven.

Not as complex as it sounds, just a poor design with cleaning, servicing and safety in mind. Only 4 main bits,  front glass+handle, frame/back glass, 2 hinges. Better if you take the door off and work in it on a flat surface but the spring hinges are a bitch to get safe in this model. In fact they are never safe unless in their proper place, they are held open by two bits that are easy to knock unsafe and fingers are then in distinct danger. Another triumph of cosmetics and cheapness over safety, ease of use and function! But it is about 30 years old . . .

Can't find an assembly diagram for this model and I am not taking it apart again to photograph!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 27, 2018, 01:28:10 AM
On any oven I've ever seen the glass is built into the door. Some doors are removable but cleaning just takes scrubbing the inner glass with some lye. The fumes are intoxicating.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 27, 2018, 02:05:38 AM
On any oven I've ever seen the glass is built into the door. Some doors are removable but cleaning just takes scrubbing the inner glass with some lye. The fumes are intoxicating.

I think it is a regulation in Europe that there has to be a ventilated gap, between the inner and outer glasses, so air can pass to keep the outer at a tempersture that will not damage skin. Water vapour and fat fumes inevitably get into that gap requiring access to all glass surfaces for cleaning. Standard oven clesner usually works, maybe with a fine grade wire-wool or a scraper blade for really stubborn bits.

You people over there seem to love lye! When I moved in the ceramic hob was so encrusted I had to lay cloth on it and pour ammonia onto that, covering the whole with cling film. I then left it for three days before I moved in. Left the windows cracked open on the secure locks. Needed a fan in the fully open window to shift the fumes!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 27, 2018, 02:47:51 AM
Lye is really useful stuff. It makes a great drain cleaner, a fantastic degreaser, and if you want to start your own Fight Club you can even make soap. Cheap too.

A while back I came across a thread on another site where a guy was asking about the best degreaser to use on an engine. He got the usual answers - benzene, white spirits, acetone - but some smart-ass had to point out the boiling hot lye was the best degreaser you can easily get your hands on. We never found out if he survived...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on May 27, 2018, 07:42:43 AM
Lye is really useful stuff. It makes a great drain cleaner, a fantastic degreaser, and if you want to start your own Fight Club you can even make soap. Cheap too.

A while back I came across a thread on another site where a guy was asking about the best degreaser to use on an engine. He got the usual answers - benzene, white spirits, acetone - but some smart-ass had to point out the boiling hot lye was the best degreaser you can easily get your hands on. We never found out if he survived...

We usually call it "csustic doda" over here. Have used it to de-grease (c)overalls and, yes, most branded drain cleaners are coloured, scented over priced csudtic soda. Once used it to clean a two-stroke motorbike silrncer. It dissolved most of the plates and part of the old steel dustbin it was in. Then it killed the grass. Father was not pleased. Only bonus was before killing the grass it also cleaned a section of the patio of moss, lichen and mold!

But the bike sounded real angry . . .

Knew someone who thought it would be great for de-coking an aluminium motor-bike cylinder head . . . It was finless.

Hot caustic is used here to strip wooden doors and gurniture of paint, varnish, polish and, uduslly, glue. Used to be a fashion but have not seen ads for it for s long time.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on June 04, 2018, 12:47:54 AM
(https://s22.postimg.cc/65isl9lr5/20180603_175927.jpg)

It was a really crummy day so I decided to stay home, nap, and work on some of my rusty crap for a change. Two saws, one draw knife, and an egg beater drill for the hand tool woodshop. I really like the Warrantied Superior saws. They have an elegant curve along the spine that sets them apart.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 05, 2018, 07:46:49 AM
Refurbishing old tools is like resurrection, only real!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on June 05, 2018, 02:34:39 PM
I finally ordered myself a saw set so I can properly sharpen saws. The WS will be the first test most likely but I can't decide if I want to convert it to a large rip saw or keep it a crosscut.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 05, 2018, 02:38:24 PM
I finally ordered myself a saw set so I can properly sharpen saws. The WS will be the first test most likely but I can't decide if I want to convert it to a large rip saw or keep it a crosscut.

Think back and ask yourself which you have used most often.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on June 05, 2018, 03:35:50 PM
I finally ordered myself a saw set so I can properly sharpen saws. The WS will be the first test most likely but I can't decide if I want to convert it to a large rip saw or keep it a crosscut.

Think back and ask yourself which you have used most often.

It's about a 50/50 mix. I have about... twenty hand saws in total so there's plenty to choose from. And I can always reshape the teeth to a different prifle if needed. Rip saws are much easier to sharpen though. It almost makes it worthwhile to keep them set to rip and deal with the slower cut!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 08, 2018, 08:43:19 AM
I finally ordered myself a saw set so I can properly sharpen saws. The WS will be the first test most likely but I can't decide if I want to convert it to a large rip saw or keep it a crosscut.

Think back and ask yourself which you have used most often.

It's about a 50/50 mix. I have about... twenty hand saws in total so there's plenty to choose from. And I can always reshape the teeth to a different prifle if needed. Rip saws are much easier to sharpen though. It almost makes it worthwhile to keep them set to rip and deal with the slower cut!

If doing a Rip is easier then I would start there on a saw you don't mind losing! :D

PS before and after photos please  :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on June 13, 2018, 10:25:12 PM
I was all set to replace my muffler today. Ordered the direct fit assembly with new gasket to make things a little easier, jacked the car up and was prepared for a fight with the exhaust studs. Unfortunately for me, the muffler is WELDED ON so I spent an hour running around collecting pipe, clamps, and a few other bits and pieces so I can cut up the considerably more expensive direct fit part I bought up and rig something together.  >:( >:( >:(

I really wish we had power at the shop. Then I could just cut the flange off the new muffler and weld it in place. Twenty minute job, tops.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on June 19, 2018, 05:11:10 AM
Yet more broken, rusty crap. This time it's a Heston round baler.

(https://s15.postimg.cc/5r9yv9hyj/20180618_193806.jpg)

That bit sticking out in the middle of the photo is the stub shaft from the gearbox that connects the PTO. We got the broken piece of the shaft most of the way out of the locking collar but even a pair of 200 pound gorillas wasn't enough to free it completely.

It'll get heat tomorrow or Wednesday and a bigger hammer to knock it loose. Then weld the two pieces together and put the collar back on. It'll be 105° F both days...  :-[
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 01, 2018, 05:59:11 AM
I just realized that this thread is becoming a diary of my unfinished projects! The baler isn't fixed, the muffler isn't on, and I haven't had a chance to sharpen a saw yet. I did get a new arrival to make some things easier...

(https://s15.postimg.cc/3kns5ntcr/20180630_232007.jpg)

Removing broken bolts and light fab work just got a little easier. I found it odd that Lincoln is making welders in Poland though. Italy? Yes. China? Yes. USA? Rarely. But Poland?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 01, 2018, 07:29:55 AM
A lot of manufacturing is moving to Poland. They are very reliable and careful workers as a rule.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on July 01, 2018, 07:35:56 AM
I just realized that this thread is becoming a diary of my unfinished projects!

Tell me about it.

(https://i.imgur.com/6UwcU0r.png)

(https://i.imgur.com/h2fb23q.png)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on July 01, 2018, 11:42:34 AM
I can tell you right now, those won't work well as curtain rods.  :grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 01, 2018, 09:48:23 PM
The Poles make some fine machine tool accessories, like lathe chucks and other holding devices.  They  are reliable and precise.  One of the well know brand names among machinists is :Buffalo.  Odd name for Poland because I doubt that they have many of those critters roaming around Warsaw.

Not too far back in time some excellent small MIG welders were made in Yugoslavia or what is left of Yugoslavia.  They also made some pretty decent cutting tools like end mills, drills and saws.

Some of the acknowledged finest cutting tools such as carbide inserts and saw blades are made in Israel.

I believe that the Chinese are more than capable of making high quality tools and equipment. If they do then they are keeping the good stuff for themselves.  Taiwan used to send us some crappy tools but they changed their attitude somewhere along the way.  They now make some first class major tools like milling machines and Lathes. 

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 24, 2018, 09:36:05 PM
My mom's new water heater stopped heating day before yesterday. I tested the elements for power and resistance and both elements passed. Unfortunately, I couldn't definitively test either thermostat because the water in the tank was dead cold but the upper element wasn't getting 240v when the tstat should have called for heat so I had my mom buy two new tstats and installed the upper one at about midnight after I got off work.

This is where things started to go sideways... I could tell that the element was heating because I could hear it, but my meter was only reading 1v across both legs. Since it was late I decided to call it a night and have her contact me in the morning. Guess what? NO hot water. So when I get off work tonight after an open to close shift I'll be back in the closet to retest what I can and see if I can make the heater functional again.

And, I'm going to upgrade my meter to a Fluke. The Innovative I've been using for the last two years hasn't let me down but that 1v reading last night has me questioning whether I can trust it or not. The only question is, do I scrape buy and just get the basic meter or do I put out a bit more money now to get one that comes with a clamp meter in the kit? I should probably be frugal here...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 24, 2018, 10:08:48 PM
^
Flukes ain''t frugal! Not for "hobbyists" anyway, but I know what you mean. I have two cheapo multimeters and I have found myself checking them against supplies I am fairly sure of. Still got an old moving coil meter that I often have more confidence in. Especially on current, but short on shunts for it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2018, 02:36:27 AM
I'm looking at it this way, $160 for a Fluke 117 might seem like a fair piece of change but how much would it cost if I got zapped by a 240v circuit because my $30 meter failed on me? I've found myself having to dig into a fair amount of higher voltage equipment lately and I do want to be as safe as possible. Plus, with a Fluke you can usually get repair parts if it does go wonko on you and they are very durable.

A friend tried to get me into a Snap On meter some months back that was on special for only $180. I passed even though the Snappy is a good product. One feature I really like about theirs is the fact that they use standard automotive fuses for the ammeter function but I'm not sure how well a fuse designed for 10A at 12v would hold up to residential and commercial power?

That's probably a mute point though. For amperage readings I really like a clamp meter. So long as you can split the lines a clamp is much more convenient than fussing with leads as jumper wires.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 25, 2018, 07:42:35 AM
I'm looking at it this way, $160 for a Fluke 117 might seem like a fair piece of change but how much would it cost if I got zapped by a 240v circuit because my $30 meter failed on me? I've found myself having to dig into a fair amount of higher voltage equipment lately and I do want to be as safe as possible. Plus, with a Fluke you can usually get repair parts if it does go wonko on you and they are very durable.

A friend tried to get me into a Snap On meter some months back that was on special for only $180. I passed even though the Snappy is a good product. One feature I really like about theirs is the fact that they use standard automotive fuses for the ammeter function but I'm not sure how well a fuse designed for 10A at 12v would hold up to residential and commercial power?

That's probably a mute point though. For amperage readings I really like a clamp meter. So long as you can split the lines a clamp is much more convenient than fussing with leads as jumper wires.

You can get clamp meter adaptors that work with Fluke meters on the voltage range.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 25, 2018, 08:07:20 AM
I'm looking at it this way, $160 for a Fluke 117 might seem like a fair piece of change but how much would it cost if I got zapped by a 240v circuit because my $30 meter failed on me? I've found myself having to dig into a fair amount of higher voltage equipment lately and I do want to be as safe as possible. Plus, with a Fluke you can usually get repair parts if it does go wonko on you and they are very durable.

A friend tried to get me into a Snap On meter some months back that was on special for only $180. I passed even though the Snappy is a good product. One feature I really like about theirs is the fact that they use standard automotive fuses for the ammeter function but I'm not sure how well a fuse designed for 10A at 12v would hold up to residential and commercial power?

That's probably a mute point though. For amperage readings I really like a clamp meter. So long as you can split the lines a clamp is much more convenient than fussing with leads as jumper wires.

You can get clamp meter adaptors that work with Fluke meters on the voltage range.

Do they do Hall effect clamps for dc?

And it looks like Fluke clamp adaptors can cost twice the price if the cheapest meter! Over here anyway. Correction, found one at £160.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2018, 12:52:03 PM
Well, it wasn't my meter. I popped the top cover off last night and this is what I found!

(https://s22.postimg.cc/cc8qg5r5t/20180724_223020.jpg)

It looks like there was a small water leak that my brother never came back to fix after he did the installation. Thats not going to be fun to clean up.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 25, 2018, 01:13:49 PM
Well, it wasn't my meter. I popped the top cover off last night and this is what I found!

(https://s22.postimg.cc/cc8qg5r5t/20180724_223020.jpg)

It looks like there was a small water leak that my brother never came back to fix after he did the installation. Thats not going to be fun to clean up.

Fuckaty fuck fuck fuck!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 25, 2018, 01:33:48 PM
Well, it wasn't my meter. I popped the top cover off last night and this is what I found!

(https://s22.postimg.cc/cc8qg5r5t/20180724_223020.jpg)

It looks like there was a small water leak that my brother never came back to fix after he did the installation. Thats not going to be fun to clean up.

Oy vey!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2018, 02:19:18 PM
Isn't it funny that a small water leak killed the water heater? Oh well, lesson learned. I have to be the one to follow through on his projects. ::)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 25, 2018, 03:04:01 PM
Isn't it funny that a small water leak killed the water heater? Oh well, lesson learned. I have to be the one to follow through on his projects. ::)

Bummer!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 25, 2018, 06:57:56 PM
It doesn't look pretty but the heater is running. Now I just have to keep in mind the same voltage drop testing that I would use for automotive work for residential wiring. The access cover hid the corrosion so perfectly it never occurred to me to look there!

I'm still thinking about that Fluke though...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 26, 2018, 06:43:31 AM
JJ : I have three Flukes.  A 77 the old reliable, a 12 that has capacitor checking feature, and a 335 clamp on  that has a surge current recorder.   I have never had a problem with any of them.  One time, long ago I blew the fuse in the 77.  The fuse is a special sort that can be gotten only from Fluke.  As I recall it was pricey, I think it was $11.  A bit much for a fuse methinks. 

The 335 has been used about four times and it is still in new condition as is the dandy soft zipper case that it lives in.  I bought it for the express purpose of checking the surge or starting current of a 30HP electric motor.  It helped me discover that the problem with the motor was not the motor.  It was the circuit breaker in the distribution panel.  It had some weak clips that connected it to the power bars of the panel.  The clips had been arcing and had corroded the power bars. All three of them.  I repaired the bars and installed a new breaker and the trouble was gone. 

The 335 is a beauty but I have zero use for it these days as I have retired from the service business.   I use the 12 to test flashlight batteries only.  It is a cute little meter but has limited capacity. 

The 77 is the go to tool for routine test work.  I once had a problem with the input power from the service drop on my building.  I called the electric company to complain.  They said that my meter was not reading correctly. They assumed that I was using a Harbor Freight meter or some other junker. When I told that I had used the Fluke they said OK that is different.  We will send our guys right out to the site.  Sure enough the link at the pole transformer was sick and one of the three phase legs was not delivering the standard voltage.  They fixed it.

I also had a vintage Simpson monster that I had confidence in. It was an analog meter at one time.  Back in the day, it was the standard of the industry.  I gave that one to a friend who is a collector of vintage tools. 

While I am carrying on about meters let me urge you to be damned careful with those nasty couplings in the water heater.....and elsewhere.  Good mechanics are hard to find these days so stay vigilant.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 26, 2018, 02:41:00 PM
I love that story about the power company!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 26, 2018, 03:07:06 PM
I love that story about the power company!

Yeah! Nice when you can prove to those people that they are not the only ones with technical knowledge. Years ago, living in a bed sitter with overhead distribution and one drop to the whole house - three washing machines, five water heaters, electric heaters, fridges etc. I borrowed an Avo Model 7 from work (no recorders) and made a diary of the outlet voltage at the estimated high consumption times (OK, I cheated and asked everyone to switch everything they could on.) Sent the graph in and the utility installed a paper chart recorder for a week.

The, one day, I came home to find a new feed direct to my meter from a different phase. That surprised me, it meant two phases on the same board, 415V. I thought that was illegal in domestic installations, but it cured my V-drop problem! I could trust the microwave timing . . .
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 28, 2018, 03:24:21 PM
Wonder if I will be aching tomorrow? My "tennis elbow" may be back.

I have just finished drilling, effectively, 75 precise holes* in a piece of 22mm thick MDF, tightening 25 bolts very tight then applyng three coats of thinned down varnish to harden the MDF. This involved picking up and turning that heavy board a few times. The holes and bolt tightenings were to insert 25 M6 "T nuts" into the bottoms of the holes. Only one actual bolt used 25 times, needs a die run down it now . . .

It was coolish in the attic, I had very little pain of any kind (until I stabbed my left hand opening the varnish tin with a screwdriver, got a tool for that job, er, somewhere) - but you know and I know that some pains wait 12 -24 hours before they make their presence known. I had to keep trying to remember to alternate arms when tightening the bolts. This is the most "arm work" I have done for a long time - three hours total in the attic.

Why am l doing this? It is the Mark two of a new worktop for the Workmate bench. Screws go into the holes to form stops or hold downs for things one is working on. Round pieces of wood and plastic (made from old cutting boards), wooden blocks and wedges are accessories. Plus loads of steel nuts, bolts, big washers etc. Other accessories, like vertical and horizontal toggle clamps, may follow. I have an 18" x 12" x 2mm thick steel plate that may be drilled, in its corners, to the hole matrix, to provide a hard/magnetic surface

Would be great for carving wooden plaques say - no big clamps to get in the way or screw holes in the back.

May not use it much but it is brain and muscle exercise and more practical than making models and more interesting than lifting weights.! And I just like making "tools" and jigs!

(https://imgur.com/2QZ3ZwK.jpg)

I will do another picture with sone accessories in place.

When I have recovered.

* Holes, all from underside, 20mm flatbit - point on that useful to get dead on the marked matrix, depth set to take the "T nut" flange; followed by a 6.5mm hole all the way through (centre point of flatbit forms a perfect guide hole;) finally a 7mm hole 10mm deep for the barrel of the "T nut".
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on July 28, 2018, 03:38:54 PM
You made yourself a wooden welding table!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 29, 2018, 05:48:34 AM
Wonder if I will be aching tomorrow? My "tennis elbow" may be back.

I have just finished drilling, effectively, 75 precise holes* in a piece of 22mm thick MDF, tightening 25 bolts very tight then applyng three coats of thinned down varnish to harden the MDF. This involved picking up and turning that heavy board a few times. The holes and bolt tightenings were to insert 25 M6 "T nuts" into the bottoms of the holes. Only one actual bolt used 25 times, needs a die run down it now . . .

It was coolish in the attic, I had very little pain of any kind (until I stabbed my left hand opening the varnish tin with a screwdriver, got a tool for that job, er, somewhere) - but you know and I know that some pains wait 12 -24 hours before they make their presence known. I had to keep trying to remember to alternate arms when tightening the bolts. This is the most "arm work" I have done for a long time - three hours total in the attic.

Why am l doing this? It is the Mark two of a new worktop for the Workmate bench. Screws go into the holes to form stops or hold downs for things one is working on. Round pieces of wood and plastic (made from old cutting boards), wooden blocks and wedges are accessories. Plus loads of steel nuts, bolts, big washers etc. Other accessories, like vertical and horizontal toggle clamps, may follow. I have an 18" x 12" x 2mm thick steel plate that may be drilled, in its corners, to the hole matrix, to provide a hard/magnetic surface

Would be great for carving wooden plaques say - no big clamps to get in the way or screw holes in the back.

May not use it much but it is brain and muscle exercise and more practical than making models and more interesting than lifting weights.! And I just like making "tools" and jigs!

(https://imgur.com/2QZ3ZwK.jpg)

I will do another picture with sone accessories in place.

When I have recovered.

* Holes, all from underside, 20mm flatbit - point on that useful to get dead on the marked matrix, depth set to take the "T nut" flange; followed by a 6.5mm hole all the way through (centre point of flatbit forms a perfect guide hole;) finally a 7mm hole 10mm deep for the barrel of the "T nut".

Nice work! How did you ensure that you drilled the holes vertically? I assume you didn't hand-hold the drill.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 29, 2018, 08:05:12 AM
This awful picture (cropped from one taken with my phone) shows the Wolfcraft hand drill jig I bought decades ago and which has been a boon. It has a "V" groove inside and outside for drilling small pipes and a depth stop on one leg.

(https://imgur.com/4QnYc4G.jpg)

(I knew someone would ask!  :grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 29, 2018, 08:15:10 AM
Do should do your own version of 'Tool Time'! :)

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 29, 2018, 08:23:11 AM
Do should do your own version of 'Tool Time'! :)


He is a bit of a tool isn't he?

Did think of videoing the process but decided not to in the end. I am an avid fan of some of the guys (and one woman whom I can't find again) who do creative practical projects on Youtube - usually whilst displaying a green tinge at their facilities, I have to move things to get access to others in my attic!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 29, 2018, 08:24:21 AM
That's a shame. You could always do one just for HAF.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 29, 2018, 08:37:58 AM
That's a shame. You could always do one just for HAF.

I am lucky in that public speaking has never bothered me at all, I am extrovert in that respect. But I am lousy talking to camera; hesitant, forget things, need hours of rehearsals, retakes and editing. Would have to set up the camera behind the eye of a picture of an attractive woman or something!

Actually someone behind the camera, a person to talk to, might help.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 29, 2018, 09:08:15 AM
That's a shame. You could always do one just for HAF.

I am lucky in that public speaking has never bothered me at all, I am extrovert in that respect. But I am lousy talking to camera; hesitant, forget things, need hours of rehearsals, retakes and editing. Would have to set up the camera behind the eye of a picture of an attractive woman or something!

Actually someone behind the camera, a person to talk to, might help.

Would there be room in your loft?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 29, 2018, 09:39:47 AM
That's a shame. You could always do one just for HAF.

I am lucky in that public speaking has never bothered me at all, I am extrovert in that respect. But I am lousy talking to camera; hesitant, forget things, need hours of rehearsals, retakes and editing. Would have to set up the camera behind the eye of a picture of an attractive woman or something!

Actually someone behind the camera, a person to talk to, might help.

Would there be room in your loft?

Well, everything needed would be in the correct place to hand and I would not have to move from my side of the bench. With the upper flap closing off the loft hatch (the flap can be stood on) and the 18mm lens on the Nikon I reckon I could just about get the framing right! That overall picture was taken with my Lumix at 25mm, its widest angle, standing as close to the open hatch as I dared. There would be closer shots needed of course. I have the app to control the Lumix, including zoom, remotely with my smartphone but, unfortunately, the Nikon D5300 does not have NFC. The Lumix set about 6 feet high (just enough height at the roof apex) (need a rig set up clamped to the rafters for that) might give the right angle for all shots.

This kind of thing takes quite a lot of thought and production don't it!?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 29, 2018, 10:30:51 AM
That's a shame. You could always do one just for HAF.

I am lucky in that public speaking has never bothered me at all, I am extrovert in that respect. But I am lousy talking to camera; hesitant, forget things, need hours of rehearsals, retakes and editing. Would have to set up the camera behind the eye of a picture of an attractive woman or something!

Actually someone behind the camera, a person to talk to, might help.

Would there be room in your loft?

Well, everything needed would be in the correct place to hand and I would not have to move from my side of the bench. With the upper flap closing off the loft hatch (the flap can be stood on) and the 18mm lens on the Nikon I reckon I could just about get the framing right! That overall picture was taken with my Lumix at 25mm, its widest angle, standing as close to the open hatch as I dared. There would be closer shots needed of course. I have the app to control the Lumix, including zoom, remotely with my smartphone but, unfortunately, the Nikon D5300 does not have NFC. The Lumix set about 6 feet high (just enough height at the roof apex) (need a rig set up clamped to the rafters for that) might give the right angle for all shots.

This kind of thing takes quite a lot of thought and production don't it!?

What's your post code?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 29, 2018, 10:57:22 AM
That's a shame. You could always do one just for HAF.

I am lucky in that public speaking has never bothered me at all, I am extrovert in that respect. But I am lousy talking to camera; hesitant, forget things, need hours of rehearsals, retakes and editing. Would have to set up the camera behind the eye of a picture of an attractive woman or something!

Actually someone behind the camera, a person to talk to, might help.

Would there be room in your loft?

Well, everything needed would be in the correct place to hand and I would not have to move from my side of the bench. With the upper flap closing off the loft hatch (the flap can be stood on) and the 18mm lens on the Nikon I reckon I could just about get the framing right! That overall picture was taken with my Lumix at 25mm, its widest angle, standing as close to the open hatch as I dared. There would be closer shots needed of course. I have the app to control the Lumix, including zoom, remotely with my smartphone but, unfortunately, the Nikon D5300 does not have NFC. The Lumix set about 6 feet high (just enough height at the roof apex) (need a rig set up clamped to the rafters for that) might give the right angle for all shots.

This kind of thing takes quite a lot of thought and production don't it!?

What's your post code?

Why is that relevant?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 29, 2018, 11:17:12 AM
I was thinking of offering my services as a camera operator. You can PM it to me if you like. :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 29, 2018, 11:26:29 AM
I was thinking of offering my services as a camera operator. You can PM it to me if you like. :D

Hmm, thanks for the offer, Tank, but I am sufficiently "uncomfortable" with the idea that I fear I must turn it down. Seems stupid to be camera shy but not worrying about standing on a stage in front of an audience! Was wondering about a Power Point type show once.

Anyway, Gloucester is a fair trip!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 29, 2018, 05:36:32 PM
This awful picture (cropped from one taken with my phone) shows the Wolfcraft hand drill jig I bought decades ago and which has been a boon. It has a "V" groove inside and outside for drilling small pipes and a depth stop on one leg.

(https://imgur.com/4QnYc4G.jpg)

(I knew someone would ask!  :grin:

I should get one of those.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 29, 2018, 06:00:06 PM
^

Yeah, and I have discovered I can make a small wood turning lathe out of it for some of the afore mentioned accessories for my project. Pictures tomorrow.

It is a useful tool if you need pretty right angled holes in walls etc as well. Used it to install rods for a "bracketless" shelf in one place. Other end of rods went into the edge of the shelf.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 29, 2018, 06:33:28 PM
I was thinking of offering my services as a camera operator. You can PM it to me if you like. :D

Hmm, thanks for the offer, Tank, but I am sufficiently "uncomfortable" with the idea that I fear I must turn it down. Seems stupid to be camera shy but not worrying about standing on a stage in front of an audience! Was wondering about a Power Point type show once.

Anyway, Gloucester is a fair trip!
Well if you change your mind you know where I am :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 29, 2018, 08:58:47 PM
I was thinking of offering my services as a camera operator. You can PM it to me if you like. :D

Hmm, thanks for the offer, Tank, but I am sufficiently "uncomfortable" with the idea that I fear I must turn it down. Seems stupid to be camera shy but not worrying about standing on a stage in front of an audience! Was wondering about a Power Point type show once.

Anyway, Gloucester is a fair trip!
Well if you change your mind you know where I am :D

Thanks, Tank.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 29, 2018, 10:38:25 PM
I have one of those drilling fixtures floating around somewhere in my garage.  It was sold many many moons ago by Sears and Roebuck stores.  It is a useful tool for a number of jobs.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 30, 2018, 02:04:38 PM
Here is my sort of wood lathe. Needs a longer stud to get the work level with the columns. Can't do much with sharp tools but, using a file and abrasive paper I now have a set of discs all the same size and smooth. Can't make them a precise size so each set will be colour coded or something.

They were cut initially using a hole saw,

(https://imgur.com/D7K4Np7.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 31, 2018, 02:30:47 AM
Clever stuff Dave.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on July 31, 2018, 04:11:20 PM
Well, the best laid plans etc.

After three days adrying the last coat of varnish on my project is still tacky - OK, that varnish is 10 years old, though it has been krpt under one of the kitchen cabinets.

Too tacky to sand off and I don't want to use heat (and my heat gun seems to be defunct anyway) or nasty chemicals. Last resort is a craftknife type blade held at 90 to the surface and drawn back and forth as a scraper. That works, but not in the current heat in the attic!

When I was in the RAF, in our 6 month version of "boot camp," we had to, very gently, scrape the broom and polisher handles every week to clean them, using old fashioned razor blades. Health and safety? WTF is that!? No lines must be seen and as little wood as possible removed! I am a well practiced scraper . . . You can get an excellent finish this way.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 01, 2018, 03:12:27 PM
Best laid plans go awry  :(

Further into the projrct - Dave's mini-mill. Never going to be a precision instrument but... The pitch of the holes was partly chosen for this idea. Setting up for a parallel run will take a little care and it is only for wood and plastics... well, maybe thin aluminium.

But, I did not take the design of the drill press into account enough, in the circled area the corner of the drill slide hits the top of the table when the handle is pressed down, so (at the moment) I cannot use the full width of the table. Maybe using the drill rather than the router will get the bit lower, or can I find/modify a 6mm chuck with a 6mm stem I wonder? Should really be a collet chuck.

(https://imgur.com/xn4x5TC.jpg)

Of more success is the foot switch. Gives both hands free for holding/aligning things on the drill press, router etc by allowing power on/off without letting go of the job to hit the switch.

(https://imgur.com/Xw8kqF1.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 01, 2018, 03:19:41 PM
Would a suitable-sized slot routed into the table top to accommodate the offending corner of the drill solve the problem?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 01, 2018, 03:57:20 PM
Would a suitable-sized slot routed into the table top to accommodate the offending corner of the drill solve the problem?

Er, by "table" I meant the long slide table of the mill base. Cutting a third of the width out off that would not be a good idea! Anyway, it would fall apart . . . I could, maybe, cut a little off the drill slide corner. A minorish design change of the whole drill press, the drill holding collar being at the bottom of the slide, would have prevented this!

Using the drill, which is not designed for side thrust, or an extension chuck is the only viable idea. There is an extension 6mm collet chuck available for less than a tenner, fits to a 6mm shaft so I would beed a bit of precision ground 6mm diameter steel rod. They have a suitable grinder at work, but all my old contacts have retired now.

[Pause]

OK, 6mm dia precision ground silver steel rod also now purchased. Probably take several hacksaw blades to cut it though.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 01, 2018, 06:26:15 PM
Would a suitable-sized slot routed into the table top to accommodate the offending corner of the drill solve the problem?

Er, by "table" I meant the long slide table of the mill base. Cutting a third of the width out off that would not be a good idea! Anyway, it would fall apart . . . I could, maybe, cut a little off the drill slide corner. A minorish design change of the whole drill press, the drill holding collar being at the bottom of the slide, would have prevented this!

Using the drill, which is not designed for side thrust, or an extension chuck is the only viable idea. There is an extension 6mm collet chuck available for less than a tenner, fits to a 6mm shaft so I would beed a bit of precision ground 6mm diameter steel rod. They have a suitable grinder at work, but all my old contacts have retired now.

[Pause]

OK, 6mm dia precision ground silver steel rod also now purchased. Probably take several hacksaw blades to cut it though.

OK, then what about adding a little "platform" under that green clamp to raise it above the table? Perhaps I'm not understanding the problem: I thought the bit could not go low enough.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 01, 2018, 06:57:48 PM
Would a suitable-sized slot routed into the table top to accommodate the offending corner of the drill solve the problem?

Er, by "table" I meant the long slide table of the mill base. Cutting a third of the width out off that would not be a good idea! Anyway, it would fall apart . . . I could, maybe, cut a little off the drill slide corner. A minorish design change of the whole drill press, the drill holding collar being at the bottom of the slide, would have prevented this!

Using the drill, which is not designed for side thrust, or an extension chuck is the only viable idea. There is an extension 6mm collet chuck available for less than a tenner, fits to a 6mm shaft so I would beed a bit of precision ground 6mm diameter steel rod. They have a suitable grinder at work, but all my old contacts have retired now.

[Pause]

OK, 6mm dia precision ground silver steel rod also now purchased. Probably take several hacksaw blades to cut it though.

OK, then what about adding a little "platform" under that green clamp to raise it above the table? Perhaps I'm not understanding the problem: I thought the bit could not go low enough.

It is not that obvious from that view. Not being able to raise the mill table as normal I have to set the travel of the drill press slide, with that slide at its lowest position with the handle pressed down, for the tip of the bit to reach the correct height above the mill table. There is an adjusting screw to adjust that lowest height so I can use "gauges", say drill shanks, to get a series of depths of cut.

But when the handle is pressed down the bottom corner of drill slide hits the mill table - when the tip of the bit is about 20mm above the table. So, I have to extend the position of the tip say 15mm lower.  A quick sketch, parts not in scale:

(https://imgur.com/KuQQJj9.jpg)

The circled parts are those which collide when the handle is operated.

As I said, if the drill/router holding collar were at the bottom corner if the slide, where it is in the circle, there would be no probs.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 01, 2018, 07:27:08 PM
Oh, I see it's a bit more complicated than I thought. An obvious solution doesn't spring to my mind. The whole of HAF will be waiting with bated breath to see how you solve it (no pressure).
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 01, 2018, 07:50:05 PM
I was a bit worried when I saw the words "drill press" and "mill" used together when your first photo didn't load for me but now I can see what you're doing. As far as clearance goes, once you have your workpiece clamped in a vise it might raise it enough to allow the router room to sink in, depending on how far off of scale your drawing is.

They offer some fairly stout vises for mini Mills that sit a fair bit higher than a standard dp vise. Together with some parallels that might be just what you need. To cut your piece of rod I'd try to get my hands on an abrasive carbide hacksaw blade. They work very well for cutting hardened materials and aren't very expensive.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 01, 2018, 08:01:38 PM
Oh, I see it's a bit more complicated than I thought. An obvious solution doesn't spring to my mind. The whole of HAF will be waiting with bated breath to see how you solve it (no pressure).
Well, as I said before the only obvious solution (barring buying a benchtop mill and there is a limit as to how much loading the attic floor will take, let alone floor space!) is to put an extension chuck in the router to bring the tip of the bit below that corner.  Even then the extra leverage side forces mean that slow, shallow cuts are indicated.

But, as I have also said, solving problems similar in type to this were what made my day at work satifying. One might wonder what the real purpose of this project is for me - is it the final product itself or the process in designing/making it and its accessories etc.?

I am thinking it is the latter!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 01, 2018, 08:18:24 PM
I was a bit worried when I saw the words "drill press" and "mill" used together when your first photo didn't load for me but now I can see what you're doing. As far as clearance goes, once you have your workpiece clamped in a vise it might raise it enough to allow the router room to sink in, depending on how far off of scale your drawing is.

They offer some fairly stout vises for mini Mills that sit a fair bit higher than a standard dp vise. Together with some parallels that might be just what you need. To cut your piece of rod I'd try to get my hands on an abrasive carbide hacksaw blade. They work very well for cutting hardened materials and aren't very expensive.

The mill base is a very small home model maker's job with the table width being about 4", it'smade from aluminium. Big, heavy vises would not fit and I may want to, say, cut grooves or slots in material less than 1/2" thick flat on the table - using the maximum width of that table. I don't often need to cut steel and rarely need to work to tolerances better than + - 0.5mm.

There is not a table available for my little router but I may look at a way to mount it under this board, using the mounting points to fit guides etc. Or maybe have a "top mounted" router with guides instead of the mill base . . . This project is going to have to be flexible! A "Jack-of-several-purposes" job.

Good tip on the carbide coated hacksaw blade, JJ, I had forgotten about those. Ta.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 01, 2018, 08:30:15 PM
Oh, I see it's a bit more complicated than I thought. An obvious solution doesn't spring to my mind. The whole of HAF will be waiting with bated breath to see how you solve it (no pressure).
Well, as I said before the only obvious solution (barring buying a benchtop mill and there is a limit as to how much loading the attic floor will take, let alone floor space!) is to put an extension chuck in the router to bring the tip of the bit below that corner.  Even then the extra leverage side forces mean that slow, shallow cuts are indicated.

But, as I have also said, solving problems similar in type to this were what made my day at work satifying. One might wonder what the real purpose of this project is for me - is it the final product itself or the process in designing/making it and its accessories etc.?

I am thinking it is the latter!

The journey is sometimes as rewarding as the destination.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 01, 2018, 08:36:02 PM
Huh! Neither of my local trade suppliers, Wickes or Screwfix, carry carbide tipped hacksaw blades. Amazon do, but the shipping more than doubles the cost, to nearly £9, unless I spend a total over £20 at Amazon themselves to get free shipping. The chuck and rod are comming direct from their sellers, not Amazon.

I will find a way . . .
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 01, 2018, 08:37:01 PM
Oh, I see it's a bit more complicated than I thought. An obvious solution doesn't spring to my mind. The whole of HAF will be waiting with bated breath to see how you solve it (no pressure).
Well, as I said before the only obvious solution (barring buying a benchtop mill and there is a limit as to how much loading the attic floor will take, let alone floor space!) is to put an extension chuck in the router to bring the tip of the bit below that corner.  Even then the extra leverage side forces mean that slow, shallow cuts are indicated.

But, as I have also said, solving problems similar in type to this were what made my day at work satifying. One might wonder what the real purpose of this project is for me - is it the final product itself or the process in designing/making it and its accessories etc.?

I am thinking it is the latter!

The journey is sometimes as rewarding as the destination.
Or even more so?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 01, 2018, 09:11:36 PM
Final illustrations . . .

(https://imgur.com/9Zm0DV6.jpg)

The router mounted, slider hits table before bit anywhere close.

(https://imgur.com/naKjlnA.jpg)

The drill used, lots of space.

In both cases the drill press handle is held all the way down.

The power control system in the router gives a lot more torque at low speeds than the drill speed control circuit can achieve with similar wattages.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 01, 2018, 10:33:35 PM
Why not fab a new holder for the drill using the existing mount but have a support "ladder" that gives you more clearance? Instead ov the support for the holder dropping down, have it run straight back to the column. Might be a welding shop nearby that could either weld or braze it into place. An epoxy could work too.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 02, 2018, 05:09:31 AM
Why not fab a new holder for the drill using the existing mount but have a support "ladder" that gives you more clearance? Instead ov the support for the holder dropping down, have it run straight back to the column. Might be a welding shop nearby that could either weld or braze it into place. An epoxy could work too.

I wish!

I live in a one room (plus kitchen and bathroom) apartment on the 1st (English style) floor of a block of four in a town terrace with outside space (just) for one car. My workshop is an attic with a working floor area about 8ft by 6ft. The worbench is a Black & Decker Workmate and I am limited as to how much weight there is and how much hammering I can do.  Sorry, misread second sentence, yes, with the right facilities the drill slide could be remodelled. I have previously looked for a jobbing welder round here who can do more than stick a patch on a car without much success, welding cast iron takes skill. Ditto workshops willing to do "coffee break jobs" for a fiver. They must exist but they do not advertise and usually work in obscure, cheap rent, areas. Gloucester is not a cheap rent area . . . That "five minute job" when I was at work and had access to heavy drills, lathes, mills and all varieties of welding kit can be a back-breaker now.

We don't have the spread of home workshop owners or suppliers in England - "do-it-yourself" is mostly restricted to decorating and light woodwork for 99% of houses. The essential "frontier spirit" where if you could not make or fix it yourself then you had to do without until industry caught up never happened here. I think this is why the vast majority of Mr (and a very few Ms) Fixits and home inventors on Youtube are American, why you have "Maker Fairs" and we don't. As far as home/farm made "inventions" go you usually have to look towards the necessary ingenuity displayed in rural areas in low economy areas (as much of America once was and maybe still has).

We Brits have not needed to develop those skills or own those kind of facilities for too long, there is always a tradesman just around the corner or a fsctory/repair centre within a reasonable few miles and, mostly, if it breaks we buy another. I buck that trend America has mostly developed out of such constant need, but the independant, self-resourceful Jack-of-all-trades pioneer spirit seems to remain.

I think you have it in aces, JJ!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 02, 2018, 05:31:23 AM
Work oUT the dimensions of the part you need and I'll see if I can knock something together for you once my arm starts working properly again. We have an enormous junk pile that I'm sure could supply enough scrap pieces. I'll even try to make it look pretty...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 02, 2018, 06:24:43 AM
Work oUT the dimensions of the part you need and I'll see if I can knock something together for you once my arm starts working properly again. We have an enormous junk pile that I'm sure could supply enough scrap pieces. I'll even try to make it look pretty...

Many thanks for the offer, JJ, but I think buying a differently designed drill press or, definitely, the extension chuck might be cheaper than shipping bits both ways over the Pond in any decent time scale!

I did a general Google search on "carbide tipped hacksaw blades gloucester" and have found we have a branch of "Tool Station" in an industrial estate way over on the other side of town that I did not know about, but they only do gritted blades for ceramic/stone cutting.  :(
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 02, 2018, 06:58:53 AM
(https://imgur.com/6U8qA6t.jpg)

Close to what I need!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 02, 2018, 11:28:25 AM
Sorting out some camera stuff I came accross a front mounting extra-wide angle lense I had forgotten about.

(https://imgur.com/fa6cuj0.jpg)

The camera focussed on one of the trusses about half way across and the shadow at the bottom front is partly the lens shadow with the built in flash.

As I said, space is at a bit of a premium and you soon learn where to duck! It was hot up there so I did not play for long.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 02, 2018, 11:57:20 AM
Work oUT the dimensions of the part you need and I'll see if I can knock something together for you once my arm starts working properly again. We have an enormous junk pile that I'm sure could supply enough scrap pieces. I'll even try to make it look pretty...

Many thanks for the offer, JJ, but I think buying a differently designed drill press or, definitely, the extension chuck might be cheaper than shipping bits both ways over the Pond in any decent time scale!

I did a general Google search on "carbide tipped hacksaw blades gloucester" and have found we have a branch of "Tool Station" in an industrial estate way over on the other side of town that I did not know about, but they only do gritted blades for ceramic/stone cutting.  :(

Well, my offer stands if you change your mind. It'd be a fun project and a good workout for my new welder.

Try the grit blade. I know I've used them in the past to cut steel. Just can't remember exactly what it was. Kind of like using masonry line to cut plastic pipe.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 02, 2018, 02:06:05 PM
Sorting out some camera stuff I came accross a front mounting extra-wide angle lense I had forgotten about.

(https://imgur.com/fa6cuj0.jpg)

The camera focussed on one of the trusses about half way across and the shadow at the bottom front is partly the lens shadow with the built in flash.

As I said, space is at a bit of a premium and you soon learn where to duck! It was hot up there so I did not play for long.

That's quite clear. It looks like an angle of about 180°. That will be useful for making light probes to use in IBL (image-based lighting) rendering. Does it fit in front of your normal lens?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 02, 2018, 03:21:13 PM
They claim it is 180, the round stool top on the left would have been about a foot in front of the lens. There was slso a UV, a CPL and an adaptor between the two lenses and the only current lens I could mount it on was the 18-140mm job, need a new filter adaptor for new 18-55mm.

And, yes, it does mount via the filter thread! It is not a high quality item. But I think the comparison info is wrong, it clains it is a bayonet fit with a 35mm focal length and 30x zoom! Though the spec looks about right.

Wondering about the price, I paid £30 for mine 6 years ago. Too many things wrong about this advert.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0017W70JE/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 02, 2018, 05:51:36 PM
They claim it is 180, the round stool top on the left would have been about a foot in front of the lens. There was slso a UV, a CPL and an adaptor between the two lenses and the only current lens I could mount it on was the 18-140mm job, need a new filter adaptor for new 18-55mm.

And, yes, it does mount via the filter thread! It is not a high quality item. But I think the comparison info is wrong, it clains it is a bayonet fit with a 35mm focal length and 30x zoom! Though the spec looks about right.

Wondering about the price, I paid £30 for mine 6 years ago. Too many things wrong about this advert.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0017W70JE/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Thanks. For IBL, the quality is not that important, so a bit of blurriness doesn't matter.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 03, 2018, 02:28:02 PM
After my mention if something to hold, say, flower stems steady on the photo tips etc thread I got to thinking further . . .

Initial stages of my "flower stem holder":

Piece of 1.5mm plastic coated fencing wire bent triple and twisted. Three pieces of silicon rubber aquarium air pump tube. 6 heat shrink tubes, three at each end to give triple thickness. Two right angle plastic cabinet corner blocks, centre hole drilled and taper reamed to be a push fit for the ends of the wires. 1mm hole, very carefully, drilled through blocks and wires to accept a 2mm nail as a fixing pin.

Then I got too sweaty, even with the fan on, up there to go further. Not bad less than an hour's thinking and doing even if I do blow my own trumpet!

Flexible enough. Now needs a plate or bracket to go under the camera and some way to hold the peg, or whatever, at the other end.

(https://imgur.com/a/JiU9nEs.jpg)

For some reason the image does not seem to arrive, I sent it twice to Imgur, got the links but neither of them seem to work! And, yes, double checked the .jpg.

Hmm was it because I said no to them holding all my data I wonder? All the previous links seem to still be working.

Try another image from Imgur:

(https://imgur.com/a/rIhmhcl.jpg)

Well, that is strange!

(https://imgur.com/a/bsh7sB5.jpg)

First the other image uploaded, then it disappeared. Photo taken with phone (other was with tablet) also not showing. Maybe I can still store but not share? Bummer.


Sorry 'bout this folks! Here is a copy/paste link fom another post

(https://imgur.com/6U8qA6t.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 03, 2018, 05:28:55 PM
(https://www.happyatheistforum.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi778.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fyy67%2FDaveGlos%2F20180803_144042.jpg&hash=d5b74db646b68b6030b0a092477e204621a7670f) (http://s778.photobucket.com/user/DaveGlos/media/20180803_144042.jpg.html)

There, via Phitobucket and a lot of hassle 'cos I ain't paying!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 03, 2018, 08:26:06 PM
Youtuber demonstrating good practice for getting a workshop injury. He has been wearing those glives whilst he cuts steel with an angle grinder and welds it - but, has he changed his footwear?

(https://www.happyatheistforum.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fi778.photobucket.com%2Falbums%2Fyy67%2FDaveGlos%2F2018-08-03%252020.19.50.jpg&hash=0d7646b9200e6ddecb374d6c03cba7669303e2b4) (http://s778.photobucket.com/user/DaveGlos/media/2018-08-03%2020.19.50.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 11, 2018, 12:10:15 PM
I have just spent an hour converting a 3/8 Whitworth full nut into an M10 half nut, including reducing the a/f size - using a grindstone then a drill in a stand and a file - all because I lost one and can't buy any in quantities less than 200. And I have no M10 nuts either. But will now buy a few at an inflated price via Amazon.

But, it now fits perfectly in its recess and does its job. I always thought the larger camera mount thread was 3/8 W but it seems it us now 3/8 16 UNC.

Wish I still had access to a proper mill and proper lathe . . .
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 11, 2018, 01:01:25 PM
This Nikon 50mm f1.4 was the first lens I bought and I still have it. It is non-AI, so not mountable on my Nikon D600. I would like to use it, because it is very fast and built like a tank (no plastic, all metal construction).

(https://i.imgur.com/2GWgw7d.jpg) (https://i.imgur.com/9R7p5OJ.jpg)

I believe they can be converted, so I'm considering it as a DIY project, following some instructions on the internet.

Removing the little screws to enable the back ring to be removed for milling is going to be my first hurdle.

(https://i.imgur.com/PXDvlnV.jpg)

The screws are supposed to be secured with some kind of Loctite compound, which is reportedly not too difficult to breach, but I wish I had better workshop skills. I would appreciate some advice from you guys.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 11, 2018, 01:18:37 PM
So long as it's not one of the "red" variants of locktite you should be fine with a quality driver. Of red you will want to use some heat to soften the compound before attempting and it can take a lot of heat. A small impact driver may help as well if you think the lens can stand up to some gentle tapping. What type of screws are they? I can't make it out from the photo.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 11, 2018, 02:21:54 PM
So long as it's not one of the "red" variants of locktite you should be fine with a quality driver. Of red you will want to use some heat to soften the compound before attempting and it can take a lot of heat. A small impact driver may help as well if you think the lens can stand up to some gentle tapping. What type of screws are they? I can't make it out from the photo.

They are this type.
(https://i.imgur.com/MVOIGYm.jpg)

One guy recommends heating the lens at 55°C for 0.5 hours. Lenses are designed withstand this. Another says to heat the screw head with a soldering iron.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 11, 2018, 02:33:09 PM
A soldering iron would probably work well, especially if the screws are aluminum though I can't say whether they are or not. You will want a hollow ground driver for those screws that's as tight a fit as possible. If you can find a spec from Nikon or measure the slot yourself you'd be miles ahead.

PB Swiss makes excellent slotted drivers if they are available in South Africa. They are expensive but the cost would, I think, pale in comparison to that of your lens. Gedore might be more readily available in your area but I don't know whether they offer hollow ground drivers or not.

Another possibility is to take your lens to a gunsmith. They tens to have a wide selection of hollow ground drivers due to their work and might be able to help you. At least around here they would.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 11, 2018, 02:43:21 PM
A soldering iron would probably work well, especially if the screws are aluminum though I can't say whether they are or not. You will want a hollow ground driver for those screws that's as tight a fit as possible. If you can find a spec from Nikon or measure the slot yourself you'd be miles ahead.

PB Swiss makes excellent slotted drivers if they are available in South Africa. They are expensive but the cost would, I think, pale in comparison to that of your lens. Gedore might be more readily available in your area but I don't know whether they offer hollow ground drivers or not.

Another possibility is to take your lens to a gunsmith. They tens to have a wide selection of hollow ground drivers due to their work and might be able to help you. At least around here they would.

Thanks for the advice. I did a quick search and PB Swiss tools are available here. Gedore is also available everywhere.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 11, 2018, 02:43:35 PM
So long as it's not one of the "red" variants of locktite you should be fine with a quality driver. Of red you will want to use some heat to soften the compound before attempting and it can take a lot of heat. A small impact driver may help as well if you think the lens can stand up to some gentle tapping. What type of screws are they? I can't make it out from the photo.

They are this type.
(https://i.imgur.com/MVOIGYm.jpg)

One guy recommends heating the lens at 55°C for 0.5 hours. Lenses are designed withstand this. Another says to heat the screw head with a soldering iron.

I was going to suggest heating the screwdriver firstt, that would work better with Philips screws, but heating the screw would make it expand jn the hole, maybe making it tighter. Hesting the whoke lens would be better.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 11, 2018, 02:47:20 PM
So long as it's not one of the "red" variants of locktite you should be fine with a quality driver. Of red you will want to use some heat to soften the compound before attempting and it can take a lot of heat. A small impact driver may help as well if you think the lens can stand up to some gentle tapping. What type of screws are they? I can't make it out from the photo.

They are this type.
(https://i.imgur.com/MVOIGYm.jpg)

One guy recommends heating the lens at 55°C for 0.5 hours. Lenses are designed withstand this. Another says to heat the screw head with a soldering iron.

I was going to suggest heating the screwdriver firstt, that would work better with Philips screws, but heating the screw would make it expand jn the hole, maybe making it tighter. Hesting the whoke lens would be better.

I will definitely not put my faith a my kitchen oven, but will use a GC oven that controls to 0.01°C.  I will first get the correct driver before I attempt anything.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 11, 2018, 02:48:10 PM
So long as it's not one of the "red" variants of locktite you should be fine with a quality driver. Of red you will want to use some heat to soften the compound before attempting and it can take a lot of heat. A small impact driver may help as well if you think the lens can stand up to some gentle tapping. What type of screws are they? I can't make it out from the photo.

They are this type.
(https://i.imgur.com/MVOIGYm.jpg)

One guy recommends heating the lens at 55°C for 0.5 hours. Lenses are designed withstand this. Another says to heat the screw head with a soldering iron.

I was going to suggest heating the screwdriver firstt, that would work better with Philips screws, but heating the screw would make it expand jn the hole, maybe making it tighter. Hesting the whoke lens would be better.

It might make the screw itself marginally tighter, but it's the locktite that he needs to be concerned about. I've had good luck getting rusty crap apart with a sufficiently sized torch on bolts where heating the part wasn't a practical option. Usually that torch is a welder.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 11, 2018, 03:06:28 PM
So long as it's not one of the "red" variants of locktite you should be fine with a quality driver. Of red you will want to use some heat to soften the compound before attempting and it can take a lot of heat. A small impact driver may help as well if you think the lens can stand up to some gentle tapping. What type of screws are they? I can't make it out from the photo.

They are this type.
(https://i.imgur.com/MVOIGYm.jpg)

One guy recommends heating the lens at 55°C for 0.5 hours. Lenses are designed withstand this. Another says to heat the screw head with a soldering iron.

I was going to suggest heating the screwdriver firstt, that would work better with Philips screws, but heating the screw would make it expand jn the hole, maybe making it tighter. Hesting the whoke lens would be better.

It might make the screw itself marginally tighter, but it's the locktite that he needs to be concerned about. I've had good luck getting rusty crap apart with a sufficiently sized torch on bolts where heating the part wasn't a practical option. Usually that torch is a welder.

I think the Nikon SWAT team will come to get me if I took a welder to the lens.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 11, 2018, 03:31:53 PM
If you have a cooking thermometer you could heat a pan of water to 50° C and then double bag the lens and lower it into the water.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 11, 2018, 03:39:18 PM
If you have a cooking thermometer you could heat a pan of water to 50° C and then double bag the lens and lower it into the water.

I was considering that, but I'm a bit nervous about leakage. I have a good -10 to +110° lab thermometer I can use.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 11, 2018, 03:46:53 PM
If you have a cooking thermometer you could heat a pan of water to 50° C and then double bag the lens and lower it into the water.

I was considering that, but I'm a bit nervous about leakage. I have a good -10 to +110° lab thermometer I can use.
Hence the double bag! :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 11, 2018, 03:55:11 PM
If you have a cooking thermometer you could heat a pan of water to 50° C and then double bag the lens and lower it into the water.

I was considering that, but I'm a bit nervous about leakage. I have a good -10 to +110° lab thermometer I can use.
Hence the double bag! :D

 :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 11, 2018, 04:20:58 PM
If you have a cooking thermometer you could heat a pan of water to 50° C and then double bag the lens and lower it into the water.

I was considering that, but I'm a bit nervous about leakage. I have a good -10 to +110° lab thermometer I can use.
Hence the double bag! :D

Most donmestic ovens start at 50C, but I would check that with your lab thermo first. Warm it to that with a thermal reservoir (brick) in it then switch off before you put the lens in.

Lab thermo: souvenir from work is it?

:wink:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 11, 2018, 04:24:05 PM
If you have a cooking thermometer you could heat a pan of water to 50° C and then double bag the lens and lower it into the water.

I was considering that, but I'm a bit nervous about leakage. I have a good -10 to +110° lab thermometer I can use.
Hence the double bag! :D

 :thumbsup:

You could by a crap old lens on ebay and experiment on that first.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 11, 2018, 04:37:53 PM
If you have a cooking thermometer you could heat a pan of water to 50° C and then double bag the lens and lower it into the water.

I was considering that, but I'm a bit nervous about leakage. I have a good -10 to +110° lab thermometer I can use.
Hence the double bag! :D

Most donmestic ovens start at 50C, but I would check that with your lab thermo first. Warm it to that with a thermal reservoir (brick) in it then switch off before you put the lens in.

Lab thermo: souvenir from work is it?

:wink:

Yes, kindly donated by the company.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 12, 2018, 03:13:10 AM
So long as it's not one of the "red" variants of locktite you should be fine with a quality driver. Of red you will want to use some heat to soften the compound before attempting and it can take a lot of heat. A small impact driver may help as well if you think the lens can stand up to some gentle tapping. What type of screws are they? I can't make it out from the photo.

They are this type.
(https://i.imgur.com/MVOIGYm.jpg)

One guy recommends heating the lens at 55°C for 0.5 hours. Lenses are designed withstand this. Another says to heat the screw head with a soldering iron.

I was going to suggest heating the screwdriver firstt, that would work better with Philips screws, but heating the screw would make it expand jn the hole, maybe making it tighter. Hesting the whoke lens would be better.

It might make the screw itself marginally tighter, but it's the locktite that he needs to be concerned about. I've had good luck getting rusty crap apart with a sufficiently sized torch on bolts where heating the part wasn't a practical option. Usually that torch is a welder.

I think the Nikon SWAT team will come to get me if I took a welder to the lens.

Nah, Nikon doesn’t have a SWAT team. They send ninjas...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 12, 2018, 05:18:50 AM
So long as it's not one of the "red" variants of locktite you should be fine with a quality driver. Of red you will want to use some heat to soften the compound before attempting and it can take a lot of heat. A small impact driver may help as well if you think the lens can stand up to some gentle tapping. What type of screws are they? I can't make it out from the photo.

They are this type.
(https://i.imgur.com/MVOIGYm.jpg)

One guy recommends heating the lens at 55°C for 0.5 hours. Lenses are designed withstand this. Another says to heat the screw head with a soldering iron.

I was going to suggest heating the screwdriver firstt, that would work better with Philips screws, but heating the screw would make it expand jn the hole, maybe making it tighter. Hesting the whoke lens would be better.

It might make the screw itself marginally tighter, but it's the locktite that he needs to be concerned about. I've had good luck getting rusty crap apart with a sufficiently sized torch on bolts where heating the part wasn't a practical option. Usually that torch is a welder.

I think the Nikon SWAT team will come to get me if I took a welder to the lens.

Nah, Nikon doesn’t have a SWAT team. They send ninjas...

 :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 12, 2018, 01:16:15 PM
I think I should try to project a more butch image by wearing one of these.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 12, 2018, 01:31:23 PM
I think I should try to project a more butch image by wearing one of these.


Ingenious design, but a bit of a gimmick. Or "practical jewelry". Butch bling.

I have carried a small multitool for yesrs. So far it has been used to deal with the results of my perenial fragile nail problem and extract a £1 coin jammed in a shopping trolley lock!

Probably get arrested for carrying an item  that could be used as a weapon in UK  -  not so much "brass knuckles" as "steel wrist"!

Later: Coo, only about £160! And with my skinny wrists I would probably have to decided which two tools to remove to fit.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 12, 2018, 02:09:14 PM
Just thought of another use for my vacuum pump.

I have some really tiny bottles that are perfect for really tiny screws etc. 'Cept the real cork corks are a bit fragile, lacking sufficient binder. So, I could dump them in something like thinned polyurethane varnish, silicon or flexible acrylic filler or even melted wax and impreganate them.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 12, 2018, 03:16:11 PM
Just thought of another use for my vacuum pump.

I have some really tiny bottles that are perfect for really tiny screws etc. 'Cept the real cork corks are a bit fragile, lacking sufficient binder. So, I could dump them in something like thinned polyurethane varnish, silicon or flexible acrylic filler or even melted wax and impreganate them.

This is a family forum. You can't go impregnating things here.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 12, 2018, 03:21:06 PM
I don't see why not Hermes. After all, that's how families are made.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 12, 2018, 03:26:25 PM
I don't see why not Hermes. After all, that's how families are made.

 :snicker1:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 12, 2018, 03:46:50 PM
I don't see why not Hermes. After all, that's how families are made.

Wot! In a vacuum chamber?!

 :whirly:

Though there are a couple of families near me who need evacuating.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 20, 2018, 12:57:52 PM
A progress report on my project to convert the non-AI Nikon lens. I went out this morning and bought a 2.5mm Wiha screwdriver, which is made in Germany. I tried to unscrew the first little screw, but it would not budge. The tip of the screwdriver was starting to flex, so I stopped before it was bent permanently or before the head of the screw got damaged. I have read that baking the lens at 50 to 55°C would soften the thread lock compound, but I thought I would try a soldering iron first. I then applied the tip of a soldering iron at maximum temperature to the head of each little screw for 2 minutes and then quickly used the screwdriver to try and unscrew it before it cooled. The screws all unscrewed quite effortlessly, which made me very happy!

(https://i.imgur.com/PXDvlnV.jpg)

I am currently working on a sculpture project, so will leave the lens unopened for now. At least the screws can be removed easily when I have time to continue the lens conversion project. Watch this space for further updates.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 20, 2018, 02:34:42 PM
What color was the locktite?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 20, 2018, 02:52:56 PM
What color was the locktite?

I haven't removed the screws completely, just unscrewed about halfway, since I don't want to do any more at the moment. But I still did notice some material of a pale grey colour that came away from the screws.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 20, 2018, 03:13:18 PM
What color was the locktite?

I haven't removed the screws completely, just unscrewed about halfway, since I don't want to do any more at the moment. But I still did notice some material of a pale grey colour that came away from the screws.

Other thread lockers and sealers than Locktite are available, in a range of colours.

I use yellow nail varnish, 'cos I a lady friend did not like it and gave me the bottle (knowing that I would find a use for it). I hasten to add that I do not use it on my finger or toe nails!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 20, 2018, 03:16:17 PM
What color was the locktite?

I haven't removed the screws completely, just unscrewed about halfway, since I don't want to do any more at the moment. But I still did notice some material of a pale grey colour that came away from the screws.

Other thread lockers and sealers than Locktite are available, in a range of colours.

I use yellow nail varnish, 'cos I a lady friend did not like it and gave me the bottle (knowing that I would find a use for it). I hasten to add that I do not use it on my finger or toe nails!

Yes, of course. We believe you, you cheeky thing.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 20, 2018, 04:43:35 PM
What color was the locktite?

I haven't removed the screws completely, just unscrewed about halfway, since I don't want to do any more at the moment. But I still did notice some material of a pale grey colour that came away from the screws.

Other thread lockers and sealers than Locktite are available, in a range of colours.

I use yellow nail varnish, 'cos I a lady friend did not like it and gave me the bottle (knowing that I would find a use for it). I hasten to add that I do not use it on my finger or toe nails!

Yes, of course. We believe you, you cheeky thing.

Just to be sure; I don't use it on my teeth either. Oh, heck, no! Please do not let a nontoxic coloured tooth stains become a fashion item!!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 20, 2018, 05:03:53 PM
What color was the locktite?

I haven't removed the screws completely, just unscrewed about halfway, since I don't want to do any more at the moment. But I still did notice some material of a pale grey colour that came away from the screws.

Other thread lockers and sealers than Locktite are available, in a range of colours.

I use yellow nail varnish, 'cos I a lady friend did not like it and gave me the bottle (knowing that I would find a use for it). I hasten to add that I do not use it on my finger or toe nails!

Yes, of course. We believe you, you cheeky thing.

Just to be sure; I don't use it on my teeth either. Oh, heck, no! Please do not let a nontoxic coloured tooth stains become a fashion item!!

As long as it co-ordinates with your nose ring.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 20, 2018, 09:47:34 PM
What color was the locktite?

I haven't removed the screws completely, just unscrewed about halfway, since I don't want to do any more at the moment. But I still did notice some material of a pale grey colour that came away from the screws.

You should be fine with grey. If it was red you might've damaged the lens trying to screw them back in if you didn't clean the threaded holes out. I probably should've mentioned that before but it turned out alright in the end!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 21, 2018, 04:43:35 AM
What color was the locktite?

I haven't removed the screws completely, just unscrewed about halfway, since I don't want to do any more at the moment. But I still did notice some material of a pale grey colour that came away from the screws.

You should be fine with grey. If it was red you might've damaged the lens trying to screw them back in if you didn't clean the threaded holes out. I probably should've mentioned that before but it turned out alright in the end!

I feel better about it now and know the rest of the job should be OK when I resume, probably only in a few weeks. The screw issue has been on my mind; I just wanted to get it out of the way.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 21, 2018, 04:38:08 PM
So much for being financially responsible...

(https://s8.postimg.cc/eufv0wxfp/20180821_100433.jpg)

I bring it home tomorrow. Not sure if I'm going to strip and repaint right away or use it for a while first. It's in pretty good shape though. There are only two apprentice marks on the table.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 21, 2018, 04:58:11 PM
So much for being financially responsible...

(https://s8.postimg.cc/eufv0wxfp/20180821_100433.jpg)

I bring it home tomorrow. Not sure if I'm going to strip and repaint right away or use it for a while first. It's in pretty good shape though. There are only two apprentice marks on the table.

Mazel tov! What a beauty. Have you decided on a name for the new baby?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 21, 2018, 05:28:10 PM
I'll probably call it the 220, at least until something just feels right.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 21, 2018, 05:50:48 PM
So much for being financially responsible...

(https://s8.postimg.cc/eufv0wxfp/20180821_100433.jpg)

I bring it home tomorrow. Not sure if I'm going to strip and repaint right away or use it for a while first. It's in pretty good shape though. There are only two apprentice marks on the table.

I want one!

Spoiler: ShowHide
(But the attic floor would never take the weight!)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 21, 2018, 05:51:15 PM
jj did you ever get your forge working?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 21, 2018, 09:41:45 PM
jj did you ever get your forge working?

I decided to wait until it cools down a bit more. I have the old propane tank for use as the body on standby. Might go ahead and pull the valve and cut the openings this week depending on the weather.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 22, 2018, 02:16:11 AM
So much for being financially responsible...

(https://s8.postimg.cc/eufv0wxfp/20180821_100433.jpg)

I bring it home tomorrow. Not sure if I'm going to strip and repaint right away or use it for a while first. It's in pretty good shape though. There are only two apprentice marks on the table.

I want one!

Spoiler: ShowHide
(But the attic floor would never take the weight!)


I'll be in the market for a lathe next. Then a mill and if I can find the right deal a tool and cutter grinder... yeah, being financially responsible isn't going to work out to well... :felix:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 22, 2018, 07:36:51 AM
So much for being financially responsible...

(https://s8.postimg.cc/eufv0wxfp/20180821_100433.jpg)

I bring it home tomorrow. Not sure if I'm going to strip and repaint right away or use it for a while first. It's in pretty good shape though. There are only two apprentice marks on the table.

I want one!

Spoiler: ShowHide
(But the attic floor would never take the weight!)


I'll be in the market for a lathe next. Then a mill and if I can find the right deal a tool and cutter grinder... yeah, being financially responsible isn't going to work out to well... :felix:

You'll go through a natural binge phase then settle down.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 22, 2018, 08:51:27 AM
I'll be in the market for a lathe next. Then a mill and if I can find the right deal a tool and cutter grinder... yeah, being financially responsible isn't going to work out to well... :felix:

These are the tools of your trade — one has to invest money to make money.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on August 22, 2018, 09:06:28 AM
I'll be in the market for a lathe next. Then a mill and if I can find the right deal a tool and cutter grinder... yeah, being financially responsible isn't going to work out to well... :felix:

These are the tools of your trade — one has to invest money to make money.

Pay someone else to dig your holes - or invest in a shovel?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: OldGit on August 22, 2018, 09:49:42 AM
That's a lovely bit of kit!  Envy!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on August 24, 2018, 01:00:59 AM
JJ that's and old, really old. Delta Rockwell drill press.  It is made of sterner stuff.  I like it.  I have a 65 year old Delta Rockwell 14 inch band saw that I value above some of the visually, nearly identical stuff in the big box stores.  My old band saw was not made in China and neither was your nifty drill press.

Call me a xenophobe if you like.  The old time US made stuff was made of durable stuff. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on August 25, 2018, 02:41:34 PM
I have a 65 year old Delta Rockwell 14 inch band saw that I value above some of the visually, nearly identical stuff in the big box stores.

How do you make a dog go meow?

Freeze over night then put him through the band saw meowwwww.

You have to love the classics.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on August 27, 2018, 01:44:38 AM
Had an interesting one today. The tractor had been sitting for eight months and wouldn't turn over. Replacing the ignition switch, starter and solenoid were all in the plans. Turns out... the ground side bettery cable had failed. It was acting like a circuit breaker, heating up when the engine was cranked. There were three strands of that big cable still intact and the power side isn't too far behind.

The trusty test light told the tale and the multimeter confirmed. I did spend a few minutes looking for a breaker under the cowl though. It wasn't obvious where the ground side cable was connected so I didn't perform a voltage drop test right off the bat.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 27, 2018, 08:06:37 AM
A satisfying and cheap solution!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 06, 2018, 06:13:42 PM
As mentioned in the Grumpy thread I soaked the internals of my blender in soup 'cos I forgot to put a seal in.

Two point screwdriver needed to get the case open, mine was too big. Up into attic to get the craft tool and a mini cutting disc. Modified screwdriver works. Special tool needed to get motor out of case (damn!), can't make one.

Washed whole thing in (damn near) demineralised water (out of the dehumidifier tank), swung it about a bit,  and then with 100ml of iso-propanol squirted from a syringe. It is now drying in a warm oven, at about 35C, for rest of evening.

Will let you know whether it works or blows up when I power it up.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 06, 2018, 06:28:07 PM
Will let you know whether it works or blows up when I power it up.

My thoughts and prayers are with you.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 06, 2018, 06:41:04 PM
Will let you know whether it works or blows up when I power it up.

My thoughts and prayers are with you.

Thank you, Hermes.

So will rubber gloves and goggles!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 09, 2018, 02:03:59 PM
I gotta get me one of these...

Not a valid youtube URL[/youtube]
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 09, 2018, 06:57:04 PM
^

I remember the big Town radial drill we had at my last workplace, put twelve 50mm holes in a 1.5m diameter, 50mm thick flange in minutes. Even li'l ol' me could swing it around and wind it along.Very useful if you have really heavy jobs to do, and the crane to load the work pieces!

There was nearly a riot when the company said they were going to scrap it! It was older than the building and still doing a good job.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 12, 2018, 05:08:21 PM
JJ, the X-Y table looks well made at first sight, the slides and base are aluminium but the ends for the spindles are plastic, but msy have metal inserts. It was a bit sloppy and I had to tighten up the friction adjusters. Still not brilliant.and needs very, very slow action even on wood using a high bit speed and well bolted down.

The scales are stuck on tapes that tend to peel. They also seem to be stuck on wrong end first and I do not trust them at all! The handle cannot be "zeroed" to a point on the workpiece. There is a printed-on-metal scale on the X slide that can be moved from side to sude, it has no locking device, vibration might shift it. The screws seem to be M8 x 1.5 though it measures at 7.62mm in diameter (familiar number!). About 1/4 turn of backlash.

But, for £27 what does one expect? It will do its new job adequately.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01MU0ZFYF/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1


Or £20

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07BF9DGKV/ref=sspa_dk_detail_0?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07BF9DGKV&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_p=b0023f58-ff8d-4694-adc6-43892d3a8107&pf_rd_r=KJ79BQ9HESCEEB2QE69N&pd_rd_wg=h4n1I&pf_rd_s=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_t=40701&pd_rd_w=BFezI&pf_rd_i=desktop-dp-sims&pd_rd_r=b8bd1df0-b6a9-11e8-99c8-33d23753c678

Better looking job but bigger price

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07GR51DN3/ref=sspa_dk_detail_5?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07GR51DN3

Regarding a turntable; needs something light and flat/thin really, not going to take significant weight, <<1kg, and does not need a scale. Have ideas.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 12, 2018, 08:14:41 PM
I think I'll hold off on that style of table then. My thinking was that it'd be sufficient for hole alignment on a small press but a cross slide vise might be a better allocation of resources.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 14, 2018, 09:33:36 AM
I am in one if those positions where I have to, sort of, make the tool to make the tool to do the job! Though, if I can find a certain thing, the first bit might get missed.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 16, 2018, 03:57:16 PM
quote author=jumbojak link=topic=5179.msg379938#msg379938 date=1537104517]
I'd like to see that chisel. I have an old caulking iron that comes in handy for things like that. Reground to a single bevel the offset works nicely.
[/quote]

This is it, about 200mm long, there is a "hook" there as well for final scraping. It not only took the spatter off but took metal out of the corners of the gap where the weld had "leaked" through, more like the action of an engraver. Used a 4oz hammer very carefully.

(https://i.imgur.com/lNWXuJL.jpg)

Writing this a memory comes from distant childhood (sure sign of senility :) ). A friend's father made doll's house furniture and carved miniature statuary (no 3D printers in the 1950s), he made knives and chisels from hacksaw blades (no modelling tools being made in those days). He had a home made treadle grindstone made from an old sewing machine.  Also certainly the inspiration for this.

Come to think of it I seem to remember plans for turning those old machines into small wood turning lathes.

Speaking of which, I discovered today that the keyless chuck I have is a pefect fit in the  clamp-on horizontal drill stand. That can take a centre, running if I can find a non-taper one. Get another stand for the drill, plus a stiff piece of something stiff to clamp them to, and I have the makings of a wood lathe.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 16, 2018, 04:19:16 PM
Chisel from a saw blade. Interesting.

I remember hearing that the first Jo blocks were made using Johanssons wife's sewing machine after it had been suitably modified to serve as a lapper.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 16, 2018, 04:39:05 PM
Chisel from a saw blade. Interesting.

I remember hearing that the first Jo blocks were made using Johanssons wife's sewing machine after it had been suitably modified to serve as a lapper.

Had to check on "Jo blocks", but gauge blocks and slips I know off. What did he use to check their accuracy? Betcha its done with laser wavelengths these days. There is a uni I would like to visit that specialises in atom level dimensioning research - granite blocks the size of houses and huge girders seem to proliferate in their labs from pictures.

Those old treadle sewing machines turned into many home workshop devices I would guess.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 16, 2018, 06:52:36 PM
That's a good question that I couldn't find an answer to. I mean, it's simple enough to get an accurate flat surface but getting it flat and to a particular thickness is another matter when starting in a primitive metrological condition. I wonder when optical comparators came into use...

What I find most fascinating about the really big metrology labs is the effort put into thermostats. They say that whoever has the best thermostat wins and some of those hvac systems are really, really cool.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 16, 2018, 08:21:24 PM
That's a good question that I couldn't find an answer to. I mean, it's simple enough to get an accurate flat surface but getting it flat and to a particular thickness is another matter when starting in a primitive metrological condition. I wonder when optical comparators came into use...

What I find most fascinating about the really big metrology labs is the effort put into thermostats. They say that whoever has the best thermostat wins and some of those hvac systems are really, really cool.

Not hot stuff then?

In a less critical way I am familiar with the effects of temperature from my last job. Since we sold our flow meters as + - 1% up to 1m diameter the effects of the temperature on the insulating liner was critical, it had to be measured to better than 0.1%. Fun job measuring that at pressure whilst allowing for the expansion of the medium . . . The liner was moulded in on the smaller sizes but there were always gaps between it and the pipe inner surface. So they were vacuum filled with epoxy. So, on temp rise the liner and filler both expanded and reduced the measuring bore. Forgot how many filler mixes we tried as test pieces and how many tubes we put through their paces, constantly trying to find a reliable mix that could be compensated for more and more reliably in the processor.

And, of course, I had to find or design better, more constant and reliable test rigs and routines and test those by the most fundamental means we could afford. Sometimes meant shipping my delicate babies of to national calibration/test labs. Mother hens had nothing on me when designing transit crates!

See how I got addicted to solving technical problems?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 16, 2018, 11:45:22 PM
 Here's what I was working on today:

(https://i.postimg.cc/W46F5srZ/20180916_173306.jpg)

My $15 secondhand grinder isn't the greatest. It's noisy, needs a kickstart, and is seriously underpowered, but it's mine and I do use it. The biggest problem is that dinky little tool rest. It's too small to be useful, so I thought I'd upgrade it.

(https://i.postimg.cc/59FHr5w1/20180916_173316.jpg)

This is what I'm making the new tool rest out of. It's two six inch chunks of 3/16" by 3" flat bar. The plan is to drill one to 1/2" and then saw and file away a snug fitting square opening to surround the wheel, butt weld the two together, and then devise an attachment point.

(https://i.postimg.cc/KvbNVW3R/20180916_181840.jpg)

The fit is just about what I was looking for. It's close enough on all sides to provide an added safety factor and still leave a bit of room. The cutout is square enough for my liking as well.

I'm debating adding a screw jack once it's all together for a bit more stability but we'll have to see how steady it is once it's all together. I'm also debating whether to just do a layout with the old rest rather than fabricate a new mount.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 22, 2018, 05:02:03 PM
"There are holes in my head where the skills leak out . . ."
(Apologies to Spike Milligan: https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/there-are-holes-in-the-sky/ )

Having taken my small plane to pieces to sharpen the blade I wondered why it was not working properly. Tried for ages to adjust it but finally stripped it again.

I had put the blade in upside down.

But I did get my bench hook finished and a steel strip as a routing guide fitted to my bench top. Now holes needed to use it as a jig-saw guide, parallel and 45o

I bought some building sort of strip, with staggered holes, about 27mm wide, 2mm thick and a meter ĺong and only £2.37 - thoght it might be useful. It is! By pure accident the pitch is exactlý that of the matrix of holes on the work top!

I never do big stuff, sheet material will fit under the strip, cut line at edge, and a router bit with a roller that follows the strip will be used. Another position that puts the jigsaw blade right on the edge is the next job.

Picture below is of the hook and strip in position, using stops in two matrix holes to prevent the hook sliding. I decided not to fix the drill stand, quite secure with a single clamp that enables its position to be altered, rotated or even hanging off the edge. Or quickly removed.

Pic is by the phone, held above mý head, could not get it steady - this is sixth attempt and best of the bunch!

(https://i.imgur.com/J8R0VYb.jpg)

Oh, the scouring pad on the drill base is ideal for cleaning swarf etc off the work surface without scratching.  I love the scewdriver, it has an internal rotating  magazine that takes 10 normal bits and a top slides that moves them in and out of the hex drive. Won't take a 10mm socket or the hex to 1/4" adapter though . . .

Later: When I get more confident with the router I will rebate the top to set that strip in flush, leave it there and add another on top as a hold down. But I have to countersink the holes and use several smaller screws that end up sub-flush.  I hope they still have those strips in stock somewhere near that price!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 23, 2018, 09:01:29 PM
It's good when your junk a plan comes together!

Couple of years ago I bought a unit that fits between the tripod and the camera and had two arms (made from machine shop flexible cutting fluid hoses, sort of snake made from ball/socket units clipped together) with small tripod type ball heads on the end to take lights. 'Cept the ball heads were so crappy they could hardly hold themselves up. But, of course, I kept them in the junk box.

Suddenly had an idea this evening, I could make use of them in another way! Tried to take the ball ends for the flexi bits off the base but, though I drilled out the obvious pin I buggered up the ball one clipped onto trying to get it off. Then I remembered those dismantled (tried to fix but . . .) crap ball heads. Checked diameters and the ball from those, one might come to believe in the gods of the workshop smiling on one, the chromed steel balls from the heads were 0.02mm smaller than the alumium ones for the pipe!

A bit of effort to pull the pipes off, then warm the end with a hair drier, a bit more effort to push it onto the new ball and, voila - flexi arms that I can screw to clips, or whatever, to fit small lights anywhere. Could even drill and tap holes in other things as appropriate.

(https://i.imgur.com/yAXQmn6.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 23, 2018, 11:42:13 PM
Not a valid youtube URL[/youtube]

The 1100 lives again. And I really need to get a muffler for this thing.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 24, 2018, 05:13:37 AM
Kudos to JJ and Dave for exemplifying the Maker Culture we live in. I love reading your posts — they are always fascinating.

 :cheers:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 24, 2018, 06:33:22 AM
Kudos to JJ and Dave for exemplifying the Maker Culture we live in. I love reading your posts — they are always fascinating.

 :cheers:

I, admittedly somewhat half-heartedly, tried to kick-start a 'Maker Culture' round here. Contacted the ''Men in Sheds,' a local 'communal workshop' and 'Radar', a bunch that designs and makes specialist stuff for the diabled, from electronics up.

Probably because I took their lack of initial interest, and no reply from the local authorities re a place for a possible exhibition, to heart and allowed it to fade. And I realised how much effort it might take without a team, maybe even charity status. I very much envy that culture and the 'Maker Fairs' in America.

There is a council owned outside exhibition/fair/car boot sale srea, with loads of parking, that would be ideal. Combine it with tool demo/sales and craft sales etc . . .

Might have another go when the weather gets too cold to work in the attic and I have finished my editing task.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 24, 2018, 07:57:06 AM
Kudos to JJ and Dave for exemplifying the Maker Culture we live in. I love reading your posts — they are always fascinating.

 :cheers:

I, admittedly somewhat half-heartedly, tried to kick-start a 'Maker Culture' round here. Contacted the ''Men in Sheds,' a local 'communal workshop' and 'Radar', a bunch that designs and makes specialist stuff for the diabled, from electronics up.

Probably because I took their lack of initial interest, and no reply from the local authorities re a place for a possible exhibition, to heart and allowed it to fade. And I realised how much effort it might take without a team, maybe even charity status. I very much envy that culture and the 'Maker Fairs' in America.

There is a council owned outside exhibition/fair/car boot sale srea, with loads of parking, that would be ideal. Combine it with tool demo/sales and craft sales etc . . .

Might have another go when the weather gets too cold to work in the attic and I have finished my editing task.

It seems to be a cultural thing. We who are culturally similar in many ways (Brits, Australians, South Africans, Americans, etc.) are very much maker oriented (there must be hundreds of tool and DIY supply shops in my city) and take pleasure in handling tools and making things. I found very different attitudes when I lived in Beirut. Shortly after arriving there I wanted to make two very small tables to use next to a sofa, but found it very difficult to find supplies and tools in the city. People like the neighbpours were quite astonished that I was even thinking of making something myself. Another example is that I found that nobody would ever be seen dead washing their own car, unlike people here, where it is not unusual to see even very affluent people mowing their own lawns, cleaning their pools, and washing cars on a Saturday afternoon.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 24, 2018, 08:21:20 AM
Kudos to JJ and Dave for exemplifying the Maker Culture we live in. I love reading your posts — they are always fascinating.

 :cheers:

I, admittedly somewhat half-heartedly, tried to kick-start a 'Maker Culture' round here. Contacted the ''Men in Sheds,' a local 'communal workshop' and 'Radar', a bunch that designs and makes specialist stuff for the diabled, from electronics up.

Probably because I took their lack of initial interest, and no reply from the local authorities re a place for a possible exhibition, to heart and allowed it to fade. And I realised how much effort it might take without a team, maybe even charity status. I very much envy that culture and the 'Maker Fairs' in America.

There is a council owned outside exhibition/fair/car boot sale srea, with loads of parking, that would be ideal. Combine it with tool demo/sales and craft sales etc . . .

Might have another go when the weather gets too cold to work in the attic and I have finished my editing task.

It seems to be a cultural thing. We who are culturally similar in many ways (Brits, Australians, South Africans, Americans, etc.) are very much maker oriented (there must be hundreds of tool and DIY supply shops in my city) and take pleasure in handling tools and making things. I found very different attitudes when I lived in Beirut. Shortly after arriving there I wanted to make two very small tables to use next to a sofa, but found it very difficult to find supplies and tools in the city. People like the neighbpours were quite astonished that I was even thinking of making something myself. Another example is that I found that nobody would ever be seen dead washing their own car, unlike people here, where it is not unusual to see even very affluent people mowing their own lawns, cleaning their pools, and washing cars on a Saturday afternoon.

'Image' and 'face' come into this I think. In some cultures you must be sern to flsunt your wealth, even poorish people spending inordinate amounts on one set of 'good' clothes and/or gold jewellery etc, rather than on healthcare maybe.

Brits can tend to be a bit shy, publicly demonstrating your skills is 'showing off' unless you are doing it for money deliberately. Countries with a, er, shorter, maybe ex-colony, history tend to have developed more personal skills and a sharing peer culture through their early need for self/mutual-reliance.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 27, 2018, 03:27:31 AM
This made me laugh. But persistence pays off in the end.

Not a valid youtube URL
[/youtube]
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 27, 2018, 04:26:19 AM
This made me laugh. But persistence pays off in the end.

Not a valid youtube URL
[/youtube]

I am happy my lens screws were not that difficult to remove. Those threads on the bolt don't look very good. Would he be able to just insert a new one, or would he have to tap new threads?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on September 27, 2018, 08:38:55 AM
This made me laugh. But persistence pays off in the end.

Not a valid youtube URL
[/youtube]

I am happy my lens screws were not that difficult to remove. Those threads on the bolt don't look very good. Would he be able to just insert a new one, or would he have to tap new threads?
Apart from the part near the surface, which is bound to suffer the worst corrosion, I thought the thread looked quite good.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 27, 2018, 12:25:40 PM
This made me laugh. But persistence pays off in the end.

Not a valid youtube URL
[/youtube]

I am happy my lens screws were not that difficult to remove. Those threads on the bolt don't look very good. Would he be able to just insert a new one, or would he have to tap new threads?
Apart from the part near the surface, which is bound to suffer the worst corrosion, I thought the thread looked quite good.

That was my thinking too. The white residue on the threads was probably galvanic corrosion from steel studs in the aluminum head. Running a tap or chaser would clean the internal threads right up. And then antiseize on the new studs. Lots and lots of antiseize.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on October 03, 2018, 11:51:47 PM
My tool rest project just inched closer to completion.

(https://i.postimg.cc/HLk8KYvM/20181003_180952.jpg)

(https://i.postimg.cc/bNfDPHFp/20181003_180945.jpg)

Now to file it flat and square. I really want a mill, but I'd settle for a proper welding table right now.  :(

Grinding that weld down left my arm almost completely numb though. Gotta figure something out.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on October 04, 2018, 02:39:03 AM
My tool rest project just inched closer to completion.

(https://i.postimg.cc/HLk8KYvM/20181003_180952.jpg)

(https://i.postimg.cc/bNfDPHFp/20181003_180945.jpg)

Now to file it flat and square. I really want a mill, but I'd settle for a proper welding table right now.  :(

Grinding that weld down left my arm almost completely numb though. Gotta figure something out.
Ah! A gripper gripper swivellor thing!!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on October 04, 2018, 09:44:03 AM
Mr Fix-It even has to visit hospital. Fixed dodgy plug with a length of tournequette elastic and roll of sugical tape.

(https://i.imgur.com/QSzft0k.jpg)

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on October 04, 2018, 10:36:25 AM
Mr Fix-It even has to visit hospital. Fixed dodgy plug with a length of tournequette elastic and roll of sugical tape.

[img width=450 heig253506]https://i.imgur.com/QSzft0k.jpg[/img]

 :lol:

You're unbelievable. Already antagonizing the union, you troublemaker.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dave on October 04, 2018, 04:59:38 PM
Mr Fix-It even has to visit hospital. Fixed dodgy plug with a length of tournequette elastic and roll of sugical tape.

[img width=450 heig253506]https://i.imgur.com/QSzft0k.jpg[/img]

 :lol:

You're unbelievable. Already antagonizing the union, you troublemaker.

No, it was on my phone charger, won't go near the real stuff in these places! I fluffed the photo re-sixing.

But have already shown three new nurrses ways of keeping ECG leads under control using existings tapes on surgical gowns. Basically by doing the gowns up with the bows at the front and not the back. The tapes are long enough.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on October 04, 2018, 07:50:35 PM
Mr Fix-It even has to visit hospital. Fixed dodgy plug with a length of tournequette elastic and roll of sugical tape.

[img width=450 heig253506]https://i.imgur.com/QSzft0k.jpg[/img]

 :lol:

You're unbelievable. Already antagonizing the union, you troublemaker.

No, it was on my phone charger, won't go near the real stuff in these places! I fluffed the photo re-sixing.

But have already shown three new nurrses ways of keeping ECG leads under control using existings tapes on surgical gowns. Basically by doing the gowns up with the bows at the front and not the back. The tapes are long enough.

Oh, I assumed you were fixing hospital stuff.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on December 23, 2018, 02:16:49 PM
I did a bit of gunsmithing last night. One of my old rifles, a Remington 190 .22 was borrowed by my brother and brought back to me when it stopped working. He said it wouldn't cycle... turns out that the barrel was loose to the point of nearly falling off!

I disassembled the front half and tapped the barrel nut back into place with a punch and gave the rifle a good once over. I knocked the rust off of the bluing and gave it a good coating of oil. The magazine tube was very rusty so I chucked it into a drill and polished it with scotchbrite to get it back into good working order.

Now I want to get a scope for it, because I really can't see well enough these days to hit anything with the factory dovetail sight. Is it wrong of me to want a Nikon scopen for an old rifle that can be picked up used for less than $100?  :lol:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on December 23, 2018, 02:21:52 PM
I did a bit of gunsmithing last night. One of my old rifles, a Remington 190 .22 was borrowed by my brother and brought back to me when it stopped working. He said it wouldn't cycle... turns out that the barrel was loose to the point of nearly falling off!

I disassembled the front half and tapped the barrel nut back into place with a punch and gave the rifle a good once over. I knocked the rust off of the bluing and gave it a good coating of oil. The magazine tube was very rusty so I chucked it into a drill and polished it with scotchbrite to get it back into good working order.

Now I want to get a scope for it, because I really can't see well enough these days to hit anything with the factory dovetail sight. Is it wrong of me to want a Nikon scopen for an old rifle that can be picked up used for less than $100?  :lol:

So glad to see some action again in this thread that has been very quiet without Dave. As for the scope, I don't know, but if you want one, why not?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on December 23, 2018, 02:42:00 PM
I was thinking about Dave last night which is why I got off my ass and started on that rifle. If someone had looked in the kitchen window they might've had serious reservations about a man working on a rifle in his underwear at two in the morning.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on December 23, 2018, 02:54:26 PM
I was thinking about Dave last night which is why I got off my ass and started on that rifle. If someone had looked in the kitchen window they might've had serious reservations about a man working on a rifle in his underwear at two in the morning.

I shall cherish that image for ever.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on December 23, 2018, 03:00:37 PM
I was thinking about If someone had looked in the kitchen window they might've had serious reservations about a man working on a rifle in his underwear at two in the morning.

Possibly or they might of:
a)lingered and enjoyed the show
b)thought À chacun son goût and moved on to the next window
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on December 23, 2018, 03:01:57 PM
I was thinking about Dave last night which is why I got off my ass and started on that rifle. If someone had looked in the kitchen window they might've had serious reservations about a man working on a rifle in his underwear at two in the morning.

I shall cherish that image for ever.

See! see! Hermes would've lingered and enjoyed the show.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on December 23, 2018, 03:04:35 PM
I was thinking about Dave last night which is why I got off my ass and started on that rifle. If someone had looked in the kitchen window they might've had serious reservations about a man working on a rifle in his underwear at two in the morning.

I shall cherish that image for ever.

See, see, Hermes would've lingered and enjoyed the show.

 :snicker1:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on January 04, 2019, 05:21:49 PM
Nothing wrong with a scope, even on an inexpensive rifle. I shot groups with open sights 25 years ago that I now need to use a scope to get. You can get a decent scope for around $75. How far do you expect to shoot? In my case it's 50 feet using A-32 targets. The bull is 1/64th inch larger radius than the slug (22 cal).
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 07, 2019, 02:33:18 AM
Well, the hand plane Icarus advised me on is almost, almost, in working order. I drilled and tapped the mounting holes for 1/4-20 threads and found some hardware that worked. I had to grind the heads of the screws back and do a bit of file work on the threads once they were cut to length, but once I get some more lock washers it'll be in working order.

The body took quite a bit of work with a wire wheel to get into reasonable shape. The plane had been in a damp storage area and unused for many years based on the rust that was present. The frog wasn't so bad but needed a little cleanup too and the irons were lapped on a carborundum stone at the working ends. You can still see a bit of pitting but they are acceptable.

(https://scontent.fewr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/fr/cp0/e15/q65/49709888_2006748849421248_373721279271796736_o.jpg?_nc_cat=100&efg=eyJpIjoidCJ9&_nc_ht=scontent.fewr1-1.fna&oh=97bab250687a696b5d7db15f20c7ad8c&oe=5CBF8554)

On a related note I ran across a tap storage method to help maintain my growing collection of taps. Dip them in paraffin wax! It doubles as a moisture barrier and keeps the cutting edges protected. I'm building out sets in common sizes and this seems to help.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 07, 2019, 03:15:22 AM
Well, the hand plane Icarus advised me on is almost, almost, in working order. I drilled and tapped the mounting holes for 1/4-20 threads and found some hardware that worked. I had to grind the heads of the screws back and do a bit of file work on the threads once they were cut to length, but once I get some more lock washers it'll be in working order.

The body took quite a bit of work with a wire wheel to get into reasonable shape. The plane had been in a damp storage area and unused for many years based on the rust that was present. The frog wasn't so bad but needed a little cleanup too and the irons were lapped on a carborundum stone at the working ends. You can still see a bit of pitting but they are acceptable.

(https://scontent.fewr1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/fr/cp0/e15/q65/49709888_2006748849421248_373721279271796736_o.jpg?_nc_cat=100&efg=eyJpIjoidCJ9&_nc_ht=scontent.fewr1-1.fna&oh=97bab250687a696b5d7db15f20c7ad8c&oe=5CBF8554)

On a related note I ran across a tap storage method to help maintain my growing collection of taps. Dip them in paraffin wax! It doubles as a moisture barrier and keeps the cutting edges protected. I'm building out sets in common sizes and this seems to help.

That restoration job came out very well. Good to see it reborn as a beautiful tool.

You are right to use paraffin wax to store the taps; don't be tempted to use beeswax, because it is quite corrosive.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 07, 2019, 03:22:17 AM
I didn't know it was corrosive but the cost is enough to keep me away!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 07, 2019, 05:47:31 AM
I didn't know it was corrosive but the cost is enough to keep me away!

I don't know whether all batches are corrosive, but in my experience when I was doing batik work, the hot beeswax I was using definitely attacked the aluminium pot I was heating it in. Even my brass tjantings showed green corrosion.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 14, 2019, 07:16:17 AM
This is a 900mm tall maquette of a sculpture I intend to execute in metal. It started out as a torus that was then deformed and cut into slices to get this final shape.

(https://i.imgur.com/M4427xC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sitayOz.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on January 14, 2019, 07:55:19 AM
Love it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 14, 2019, 08:11:56 AM
Love it.

Thanks, Tank. Althought it's just a maguette, my daughter wants it for her house. It should work there, because her living room is about 75 square m.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on January 14, 2019, 04:13:28 PM
(https://i.imgur.com/sitayOz.jpg)

That's interesting. It has a Yin Yang-ish look to it. :tellmemore:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 14, 2019, 05:54:33 PM
That's interesting. It has a Yin Yang-ish look to it. :tellmemore:

My intention was to give a feeling of propeller movement. Your Yin-Yang interpretation is an added dimension; I guess others will have different impressions.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on January 14, 2019, 08:31:15 PM
That's interesting. It has a Yin Yang-ish look to it. :tellmemore:

My intention was to give a feeling of propeller movement. Your Yin-Yang interpretation is an added dimension; I guess others will have different impressions.

I 'see' the propeller movement now that you've mentioned it. :smilenod:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 14, 2019, 09:52:37 PM
I'm guessing that's sort of a mock up? What metal are you using for the finished product?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 15, 2019, 03:43:12 AM
I'm guessing that's sort of a mock up? What metal are you using for the finished product?

Yes, it is a mock-up. That's why I called it a maguette, which is a sculptural term for a mock-up or "dress rehearsal" before executing the final sculpture. For this one I used corrugated cardboard slices (hence the interesting textures) that I cut out by hand after printing the files from a program called Rhino. Our family factory is very busy at the moment with projects, but when things calm down later in the year I will cut the metal slices on a 3m bed CNC machine. I would like to use brass, but it isn't used much for our projects, so will probably use off-cuts of 3mm stainless or aluminium. I could use a water jet cutter to give smoother profiles, but we don't have one and don't want to pay another company to do it. As long as one has software controlled machines, one can do almost anything.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 15, 2019, 04:29:39 AM
Do you do any anodizing at your facility? I bet you could get something close to brass in color with an interesting texture too.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 15, 2019, 07:17:16 AM
Do you do any anodizing at your facility? I bet you could get something close to brass in color with an interesting texture too.

No anodizing, because all the aluminium cladding sheets are bought pre-anodized.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on January 26, 2019, 11:22:27 PM
Hermes as our resident chem wizard, you will know that stripping the anodized surface is neither difficult, nor costly. 

Actually I have anodized a gazillion small pieces and dyed them in various colors colours. 

Matter of fact I still have a substantial rectifier that I had used for that purpose.  I need that power supply like I need a paper ass but what if I want to anodize some boat parts or something one of these days. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 27, 2019, 03:43:12 AM
Hermes as our resident chem wizard, you will know that stripping the anodized surface is neither difficult, nor costly. 

Actually I have anodized a gazillion small pieces and dyed them in various colors colours. 

Matter of fact I still have a substantial rectifier that I had used for that purpose.  I need that power supply like I need a paper ass but what if I want to anodize some boat parts or something one of these days.

Icarus, I may have degrees in chemistry, but I've always been a traitor to my profession, in that my true passions are design and the arts. I would like the sculpture to develop a natural patina, so feel that the surface of anodized aluminium will be too clinical.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 27, 2019, 04:27:17 AM
I know a cabinet maker who took a job fixing an antique China cabinet that had been destroyed by a falling tree in a hurricane. The tree fell through the house and smashed the cabinet in two.

Ralph repaired the cabinet, too well at first. It looked practically brand new. To remedy this he and his apprentice beat the cabinet with chains and burned it with cigarettes to replicate the original worn look.

Just an idea to develop a patina.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 27, 2019, 05:03:37 AM
I know a cabinet maker who took a job fixing an antique China cabinet that had been destroyed by a falling tree in a hurricane. The tree fell through the house and smashed the cabinet in two.

Ralph repaired the cabinet, too well at first. It looked practically brand new. To remedy this he and his apprentice beat the cabinet with chains and burned it with cigarettes to replicate the original worn look.

Just an idea to develop a patina.

I could turn it into a performance and sell tickets to people who want to watch the event. That would take us back to the happenings staged by Rauschenberg and other pop artists in the sixties.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on January 27, 2019, 12:27:26 PM
If you do we want to see the video.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on January 27, 2019, 01:12:35 PM
If you do we want to see the video.

 :sidesmile:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on January 27, 2019, 10:31:38 PM
If you were consigned to use ally then strip off the anodized parts and allow nature to take its course.  To hurry the process you could use a sodium chloride wipe or some other suitable chemical. 

From a pure art standpoint I suspect that brass would make a better choice of materials.

My town has an annual outdoor display of metal sculptures on one of our busy streets.  Artists from around the country submit their art work that is usually in steel or other metals.  Most of the work is marvelously well done but some of it is pretty weird.  My local art museum has some spectacular permanent outdoor sculpture, mostly done in stainless steel.  There are all sorts of geometric shapes that are almost suggestive of Eschers work.   

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on February 03, 2019, 03:57:36 PM
This is a 900mm tall maquette of a sculpture I intend to execute in metal. It started out as a torus that was then deformed and cut into slices to get this final shape.

(https://i.imgur.com/M4427xC.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/sitayOz.jpg)

Wow! That's really neat! I should be checking this thread more often.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 10, 2019, 01:48:39 PM
I really love Chris' work. This was amazing. Not a valid youtube URL
[/youtube]
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on February 10, 2019, 03:34:04 PM
I really love Chris' work. This was amazing. Not a valid youtube URL
[/youtube]

That is very satisfying to watch. This guy's skill is marvellous.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 11, 2019, 02:55:02 AM
I like the fact that he figures out a simple way to do something with rudimentary tooling. If you gave a fabricator that drawing today they'd likely claim you need a cnc to cut it accurately. I mean, Jesus, the man makes his own steel to prove that it could be done!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on February 11, 2019, 03:16:20 AM
I like the fact that he figures out a simple way to do something with rudimentary tooling. If you gave a fabricator that drawing today they'd likely claim you need a cnc to cut it accurately. I mean, Jesus, the man makes his own steel to prove that it could be done!

There are two things I've always wanted to try: blacksmithing and lathe-working. I love watching skilled people fabricate metal objects. Have you had any experience in those crafts?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 11, 2019, 04:06:34 AM
Blacksmithing, yes though I'm not very good. It's much, much more difficult than a skilled hammer swinger makes it look. I have used a lathe before and would like very much to have one. Space and power constrain what I could reasonably purchase at the moment though. I wouldn't have much use for a hobby lathe, and even a "small" tool room lathe is a big, thirsty machine. I feel like it would get a lot of use though.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on February 11, 2019, 04:31:31 AM
Here's a truly grear modern blacksmith named Glenn Moon from Australia. He's an industrial smith and makes large tooling for heavy industry. Typically he uses a 1000 ton forge press but he can make difficult tasks look easy with a hammer.

Not a valid youtube URL
[/youtube]

He told me that doing this is easy. His exact words were, "ANYBODY CAN DO IT!!!" But, an hour into the excercise, I gave up. He can work magic, it seems. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on February 11, 2019, 04:27:13 PM
That Scorper and Trammel video was really neat! I have both wood- and (a tiny) metal- turning lathes. Haven't made anything with them lately, as I've been fixing things around the property and learning wood carving since I retired. I want to make some chisels for a wood carving project, but haven't gotten to it. That's nothing to do with the lathes, though.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on March 01, 2019, 10:52:51 PM
An entertaining (to me, at least) series on restoring Matchbox models/toys. The videographer always seems to add a bit of slapstick or light comedy to his restoration videos, which I appreciate.  :)

This is one of his more basic restorations.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 02, 2019, 04:38:18 AM
An entertaining (to me, at least) series on restoring Matchbox models/toys. The videographer always seems to add a bit of slapstick or light comedy to his restoration videos, which I appreciate.  :)

This is one of his more basic restorations.


Thanks, Recusant. That was an interesting watch. I liked how he explained his mind changes and thought processes during the job. My only suggestion would have been to use a micro jewellers torch for the soldering job. An electronics soldering iron is just not hot enough on a big heat sink like the body of the truck.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 15, 2019, 04:20:30 PM
Replaced the see through row of my wall and put up an extra row because a bunch of people walk through the alley.

(https://i.imgur.com/JK4olD4.jpg)

I got better at is as I went, so the top row is better, but I'm going to leave it as it is.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 15, 2019, 04:22:02 PM
Looks like a lovely place to sit in the summer.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 15, 2019, 04:58:05 PM
It's not bad until it gets over 110ºf.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Magdalena on April 16, 2019, 12:57:07 AM
Replaced the see through row of my wall and put up an extra row because a bunch of people walk through the alley.

(https://i.imgur.com/JK4olD4.jpg)

I got better at is as I went, so the top row is better, but I'm going to leave it as it is.
Very nice.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 16, 2019, 06:37:57 PM
Thank you, it was a lot of work.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on April 16, 2019, 08:31:39 PM
Nice! I laid a slab in the back yard of my previous house, in small sections that I could mix up in a 1-sack mixing machine. The learning curve was there for all to see.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 16, 2019, 09:59:24 PM
That's a damn sight better than I could do and that last row looks better than some professional jobs I've seen.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 17, 2019, 03:18:07 PM
A slab sounds simple, but any amount of bumbling can easily ruin the whole thing. Most I've ever done with concrete is for posts or pouring it inside walls around rebar, not too difficult compared to a slab.

Thanks, JJ, might not look that great on a closer look but since it's the top part of the wall I think it's good enough.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 15, 2019, 10:34:59 PM
(https://i.postimg.cc/zfDjNfQ6/20190515-170332.jpg)

I started in my homemade punching bag today. Still have two more tires to bolt on.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Magdalena on May 15, 2019, 11:26:05 PM
(https://i.postimg.cc/zfDjNfQ6/20190515-170332.jpg)

I started in my homemade punching bag today. Still have two more tires to bolt on.
I think I want one of those.
But I also want a bat.  :notsure:
It's like a really strong piñata.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 16, 2019, 01:01:44 AM
They're cheap to make, and any stick will stand in as a bat. For a while at least.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on May 16, 2019, 02:51:52 PM
Put in some pavers in my front yard.

(https://i.imgur.com/WvQ9vsN.jpg)
(https://i.imgur.com/xv6GIVV.jpg)

Wasn't too bad. I'm planning on putting in a lot more in the backyard.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on May 16, 2019, 03:32:14 PM
What did you use as a base?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on May 16, 2019, 03:40:18 PM
It's near winter so it's safeish for the pale skinned to venture out in their lunch hour.
I'm in need of a walking stick.  I want a tall one, about nose high.
Ye that maybe higher than necessary but I can always trim it.
I work near here, ten minutes walking and I'm in the forest.
https://www.google.com/maps/@-31.4862957,152.722854,754m/data=!3m1!1e3 (https://www.google.com/maps/@-31.4862957,152.722854,754m/data=!3m1!1e3)


Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on May 16, 2019, 05:06:18 PM
What did you use as a base?

I was going to use landscape clothe, paver base, paver sand, then pavers, but then I found some mats where the recommended base was different. Landscape clothe, paver sand, paver mat, then pavers. I'm not sure how that will hold up over time, but it was a little bit easier on the digging and installing. It was also a little bit cheaper by about $1 per sqft.

I haven't sealed them yet, I plan to this weekend.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on May 16, 2019, 08:18:40 PM
It's near winter so it's safeish for the pale skinned to venture out in their lunch hour.
I'm in need of a walking stick.  I want a tall one, about nose high.
Ye that maybe higher than necessary but I can always trim it.
I work near here, ten minutes walking and I'm in the forest.
https://www.google.com/maps/@-31.4862957,152.722854,754m/data=!3m1!1e3 (https://www.google.com/maps/@-31.4862957,152.722854,754m/data=!3m1!1e3)

Nice! Where I live, if I walk for ten minutes I'm in the desert (if I get past the houses).
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 17, 2019, 04:40:27 AM
After 6 months of inactivity in this thread, I want to post something fascinating. This tip may come in useful some time.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on November 17, 2019, 05:21:32 AM
That was cool. Very, very cool.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 17, 2019, 05:29:30 AM
That was cool. Very, very cool.

Yes, I shall certainly remember that trick and use it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on November 17, 2019, 05:20:21 PM
Dig it!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 29, 2020, 09:36:41 PM
I'm resurrecting this thread with progress on my handmade bow. It's an oak board bow backed with fiberglass tape. No idea what the final draw weight will be but it's coming together nicely so far.

(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/fr/cp0/e15/q65/91424347_2820577494705042_1904589598005133312_o.jpg?_nc_cat=107&_nc_sid=8024bb&efg=eyJpIjoidCJ9&_nc_ohc=G77eYoV6Lm4AX8605Cx&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&_nc_tp=14&oh=eee5d5c1272c3df1ea0d3862d9cbb227&oe=5EA70914)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on March 29, 2020, 09:41:42 PM
cool

nobody does longbows around here

i've got one we inherited from a man who died a while back, but no strings are available locally
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 29, 2020, 10:02:42 PM
There's a guy named Kramer Ammons who makes Flemish twist strings not too far from you I think. He's the fellow who inspired me to make this one.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on March 29, 2020, 10:55:26 PM
i know nothing about archery except that is fascinating, one of those things on my list to know more about, when i have more time to know more things.

i'm interested in primitive technology, and the longbow is right there at the tipping point between primitive and modern in both household economics and politics.

https://www.kramerammons.com/

^^^this guy is interesting
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on March 29, 2020, 10:59:07 PM
and now we are buying a string.

jumbo, thank you

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 29, 2020, 11:19:48 PM
You are welcome Billy. I'll be making my string.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on March 30, 2020, 09:26:58 AM
what do you uze?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on March 30, 2020, 01:31:20 PM
I have string on the way, it's a synthetic but don't tell anyone, and I'll be making a Flemish twist jig. Might do that today actually.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on March 30, 2020, 02:18:42 PM
I have string on the way, it's a synthetic but don't tell anyone, and I'll be making a Flemish twist jig. Might do that today actually.

You will need this music to do the Flemish jig.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 30, 2020, 02:23:17 PM
I have string on the way, it's a synthetic but don't tell anyone, and I'll be making a Flemish twist jig. Might do that today actually.

You will need this music to do the Flemish jig.


That would certainly make it all the more epic! :lol:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 05, 2020, 06:31:33 PM
It's not pretty but it was my first attempt.

(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/fr/cp0/e15/q65/92345414_2835096103253181_6208230726488293376_o.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_sid=8024bb&efg=eyJpIjoidCJ9&_nc_ohc=yLnQcfzs29AAX_FGQnf&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&_nc_tp=14&oh=244fbc958937b2290f9d8f5fff65b65b&oe=5EAF6730)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 05, 2020, 09:10:05 PM
Looks very neat.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 05, 2020, 10:29:39 PM
cool

we recived ours from the kramer man immediately, but it was too short as i mis-measured our bow. have to get another

(https://i.imgur.com/aazr7Cpl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/llMRGqol.jpg)

what do the rest of the numbers mean?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 05, 2020, 11:08:32 PM
Looks very neat.

It needs a lot of work. My technique that is.

cool

we recived ours from the kramer man immediately, but it was too short as i mis-measured our bow. have to get another

(https://i.imgur.com/aazr7Cpl.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/llMRGqol.jpg)

what do the rest of the numbers mean?


Is it 57" total length, 57" string, or 57" from knock to knock?

I would guess that it's a 44 pound bow at a 28" draw but that's just a guess. The second line might be a stock number.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 06, 2020, 12:16:49 AM
well, measured in a free hanging straight line the bow is 53 inchez, nock to nock. but its 57 inchez nock to nock meazured along tbe inside, in contact.

i was calling this a longbow. is it curved enough to qualify asa recurve? the difference is one inch in the string
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 06, 2020, 12:46:14 AM
It looks like a recurve to me, but I'm no expert.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 06, 2020, 10:46:41 AM
im going to send him the picture.

what im famiar with are the very short asian recurved military bows, cavalry ztyle
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 06, 2020, 12:34:17 PM
With all this time on my hands since retiring I have planes to tidy out 30 years of shite from my garage and build a workbench from some leftover chipboard and wood from a fitted wardrobe. Well the shite is now sufficiently reduced to give me some working space so I built my work bench. Fitted some nick-nack racks and a strip light. Common use tools mounted on the back board. My wood vice arrived today as well :)

(https://www.happyatheistforum.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fimageshack.com%2Fa%2Fimg922%2F5690%2FhNlZ5H.jpg&hash=90d31cc7b676cf99621b84c6579628bd11628d82)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 06, 2020, 01:49:12 PM
You're going to need a bigger bench for a vise!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 06, 2020, 04:03:43 PM
You're going to need a bigger bench for a vise!

Wait and see :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on April 06, 2020, 04:55:35 PM
Did someone say bench? Here's one I recently built to carve on. The chest on the shelf I built to hold my large carving tools and mallets. I made it good and heavy so it doesn't move when I'm using the mallet to carve.

(https://i.imgur.com/4uctX9U.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 06, 2020, 05:08:36 PM
Well, my first bow is broken. On to the second attempt...
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on April 06, 2020, 05:50:39 PM
Hickory would be a better choice for your next attempt I think, if you're not ready to try yew yet. Or, and this is one I hadn't thought of, vine maple (https://medicinebowwoods.com/vine-maple-bow-staves). Having experience with vine maple, I can see how it could work for bows. Difficult to work because of the chaotic grain pattern, but very tough.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 06, 2020, 06:28:37 PM
Did someone say bench? Here's one I recently built to carve on. The chest on the shelf I built to hold my large carving tools and mallets. I made it good and heavy so it doesn't move when I'm using the mallet to carve.

(https://i.imgur.com/4uctX9U.jpg)

Love that.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on April 06, 2020, 06:54:02 PM
Thanks, Tank! The top is birch, and the legs and rails are all maple. Then just cheap maple plywood for the panels. The tool chest is made of red oak.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on April 06, 2020, 07:23:25 PM
If I ever got a space where I could put up a workbench, I'd probably go with the English joiner's bench (https://www.theenglishwoodworker.com/the-english-workbench/). It's simpler to build than the standard woodworking bench, and can be dismantled fairly easily if needed.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 06, 2020, 08:20:56 PM
Well, my first bow is broken. On to the second attempt...

what about osage orange?

any of that near you?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on April 06, 2020, 08:30:30 PM
Well, my first bow is broken. On to the second attempt...

what about osage orange?

any of that near you?

Ah, another one I hadn't thought of. The Indians used it, but I've never seen it even in a places that sell "exotic" wood.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 06, 2020, 08:40:38 PM
Hickory would be a better choice for your next attempt I think, if you're not ready to try yew yet. Or, and this is one I hadn't thought of, vine maple (https://medicinebowwoods.com/vine-maple-bow-staves). Having experience with vine maple, I can see how it could work for bows. Difficult to work because of the chaotic grain pattern, but very tough.

Availability and cost are a major deciding factor. Oak is the only readily available seasoned hardwood in this area aside from poplar, but I don't want to go that route. I think I'll have to split out some staves though.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 06, 2020, 08:45:15 PM
Quote
what about osage orange?

any of that near you?

Ah, another one I hadn't thought of. The Indians used it, but I've never seen it even in a places that sell "exotic" wood.

it's considered a trash tree around here because the thorns are so fierce and its so invasive

i planted nine of them winter before last and the came up healthy and strong, but all died th efollowing winter

there's a couple along the road to my house, and my neighbor has a copse of them that he curses
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 06, 2020, 10:37:21 PM
If I ever got a space where I could put up a workbench, I'd probably go with the English joiner's bench (https://www.theenglishwoodworker.com/the-english-workbench/). It's simpler to build than the standard woodworking bench, and can be dismantled fairly easily if needed.

It looks beautiful. In my case I had a sheet of chipboard 244cm by 122cm which I cut up to form the base and two pieces of 10mm plywood 49cm by122cm. Drew up models on graph paper to make the best use of the materials. Very crude but very satisfying.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 06, 2020, 10:43:32 PM
You're going to need a bigger bench for a vise!

Wait and see :)

This is the woodwork vice. The 3mm aluminium sheet spreads the load.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/2893/ymMJd4.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on April 07, 2020, 01:05:22 AM
Nicely done! That should beef it quite a bit. Maybe run a rail under the right side of the aluminum sheet as well? If there's room, something like 18 mm X 50 or 75 mm tall. It would give a lot of stiffness.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 07, 2020, 01:45:14 AM
You're going to need a bigger bench for a vise!

Wait and see :)

This is the woodwork vice. The 3mm aluminium sheet spreads the load.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/2893/ymMJd4.jpg)

There's very little shear strength on the front of that bench, especially with a vise. If you could put a panel or reinforce the two by sections with some boards that would help a lot. In use it would tend to want to fall like a house of cards.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on April 07, 2020, 04:22:00 AM
It'll do for light work, though I think the chipboard will eventually prove problematic. Very workmanlike job on the construction, Tank.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on April 07, 2020, 04:50:56 AM
That should be useful for your lighter projects, Tank. I love to see the use of recycled materials that are given a second life.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 07, 2020, 07:04:43 AM
It'll do for light work, though I think the chipboard will eventually prove problematic. Very workmanlike job on the construction, Tank.  :thumbsup:

Chipboard is a pain as it only really works in compression. There is a back, which you can't see, which also goes all the way to the floor and supports the top. And it's only ever going to be used for light to medium wood work. If I manage to break it I'll post pictures of the wreckage  :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 07, 2020, 07:11:04 AM
Nicely done! That should beef it quite a bit. Maybe run a rail under the right side of the aluminum sheet as well? If there's room, something like 18 mm X 50 or 75 mm tall. It would give a lot of stiffness.

The vice is really just a third hand for supporting planks while I saw them. So for a vertical force it will only have to hold the weight of a plank. If I'm plaining a piece of wood that won't put too much vertical force and the plate will spread that around. When sawing the forward force of the cut is transmitted to the wall as the bench touches the wall at the back.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 07, 2020, 07:15:34 AM
You're going to need a bigger bench for a vise!

Wait and see :)

This is the woodwork vice. The 3mm aluminium sheet spreads the load.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/2893/ymMJd4.jpg)

There's very little shear strength on the front of that bench, especially with a vise. If you could put a panel or reinforce the two by sections with some boards that would help a lot. In use it would tend to want to fall like a house of cards.

I agree. But I won't be doing any serious metal working on it. And weight wise I won't be putting anything on it I can't lift onto it so that won't be too much. The top is surprisingly strong/stiff plywood. And there is a full back to the box section which goes across the rear of the top surface and that is secured to both 'shelves' which are also structural, they are not just sitting on the battens. But time will tell ;)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 07, 2020, 10:53:32 AM
plusses for the fire extinhuisher
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 07, 2020, 01:26:27 PM
plusses for the fire extinhuisher

Thank you. I have never had cause to use one and hope I never do!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 07, 2020, 01:31:28 PM
Oh, I meant to ask, is you little hacksaw a Bahco? I think I have the same one.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 07, 2020, 05:41:04 PM
Oh, I meant to ask, is you little hacksaw a Bahco? I think I have the same one.

It is :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 07, 2020, 10:25:49 PM
i bought a reject bathroom cabinet as a second when i worked at a hardware store. then i bolted a formica top onto it.

what do you brits call that? melamine?

(https://i.imgur.com/35xfF3al.jpg)

screwed a really nice little engine stand to the top so i can work on an assembled motor without struggling to turn it. spins like a revolving door.

the workshop itself is pretty big, but also pretty unorganized. lots of projects on the to-do list.

(https://i.imgur.com/2QinofZl.jpg)

back from the workbench is a lift that lets me work on a chassis without lying on the floor

(https://i.imgur.com/5Zm0E5ml.jpg)

that lift by itself probably added five years to my life span. i'd been lying on the ground for 40 years before i went and bought it
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 08, 2020, 03:36:57 AM
Oh, I meant to ask, is you little hacksaw a Bahco? I think I have the same one.

It is :)

It's not very good for big jobs but handy for starting cuts in pipe and whatnot when you don't have much room. Then you can go to town with the sawzall.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 08, 2020, 03:43:32 AM
i bought a reject bathroom cabinet as a second when i worked at a hardware store. then i bolted a formica top onto it.

what do you brits call that? melamine?

(https://i.imgur.com/35xfF3al.jpg)

screwed a really nice little engine stand to the top so i can work on an assembled motor without struggling to turn it. spins like a revolving door.

the workshop itself is pretty big, but also pretty unorganized. lots of projects on the to-do list.

(https://i.imgur.com/2QinofZl.jpg)

back from the workbench is a lift that lets me work on a chassis without lying on the floor

(https://i.imgur.com/5Zm0E5ml.jpg)

that lift by itself probably added five years to my life span. i'd been lying on the ground for 40 years before i went and bought it

I like your bench. Used cabinets can be a steal of a deal. We have a welding table that needs some refitting before it goes in the big shop. Then I can bolt a proper vise on.

And that is a lot of motorcycles. Cool.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 08, 2020, 12:26:02 PM
homei mprovement places like lowes or home depot occassionally get stuff in thats broken, and theyd rather sell it for cheap than fix it. i think the cabinet had a damaged back.

you can often get free standing kitchen cabinets too. just put a top on them somehow.

i live in a decrepit house with broken sash windows too far gone to fix. back when we were poorer i bought two broken storm doirs ans screwed them over the bedroomvwindows. primitive but they sealed up well.

Quote
And that is a lot of motorcycles. Cool.

its deceptive. only about half of them work on any given day. but you know what?

ive found whatz important to me.

lots of people never do.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 20, 2020, 02:39:39 PM
Just thought I'd add this cool looking sculpture here:

(https://scontent.fpoa4-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/93650179_2839308659515057_4169180971054137344_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&_nc_sid=2d5d41&_nc_ohc=dw-ln7A01p8AX_JJr70&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa4-1.fna&oh=66b6505d42403306349a235774c33474&oe=5EC178B0)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Davin on April 20, 2020, 04:02:45 PM
Just thought I'd add this cool looking sculpture here:

(https://scontent.fpoa4-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/93650179_2839308659515057_4169180971054137344_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&_nc_sid=2d5d41&_nc_ohc=dw-ln7A01p8AX_JJr70&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa4-1.fna&oh=66b6505d42403306349a235774c33474&oe=5EC178B0)
That is cool.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on April 20, 2020, 04:17:14 PM
That shark is very good. Is it in a building near you?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on April 20, 2020, 05:12:53 PM
That shark is too cool! Closest I've come with "sculpture" is the pig I made from an old (empty!) propane tank. This is Penelope, the Pink Pig, 4 years ago. The face is wood. She has since lost face due to weather, and I'm going to have to give her a face lift.

(https://i.imgur.com/F3tfFuL.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 20, 2020, 06:29:15 PM
Just thought I'd add this cool looking sculpture here:

(https://scontent.fpoa4-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/93650179_2839308659515057_4169180971054137344_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&_nc_sid=2d5d41&_nc_ohc=dw-ln7A01p8AX_JJr70&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa4-1.fna&oh=66b6505d42403306349a235774c33474&oe=5EC178B0)

Created by Matt Sanders.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 20, 2020, 07:05:46 PM
That shark is very good. Is it in a building near you?

I don't know where it's located, I got the picture from FB. :grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 20, 2020, 07:27:59 PM
That shark is too cool! Closest I've come with "sculpture" is the pig I made from an old (empty!) propane tank. This is Penelope, the Pink Pig, 4 years ago. The face is wood. She has since lost face due to weather, and I'm going to have to give her a face lift.

(https://i.imgur.com/F3tfFuL.jpg)

:grin: That's such a cute pig sculpture.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Magdalena on April 20, 2020, 07:42:16 PM
^^^
Love the shark and the pig.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on April 20, 2020, 08:47:35 PM
^^ Thanks! When I first put it out, the dogs were afraid of it! :lol:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on April 21, 2020, 05:06:13 AM
Love the pink pig. Jeff Koons would be proud of you!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on April 21, 2020, 04:18:38 PM
 :-[ His stuff is a LOT better than mine. I'm undaunted, though. I have another set of those legs, I have plans to make a burro. I think that the meat smoker that was going to be the torso got recycled, though. I'll have to go look. ETA- :yes!: It's still where I put it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 28, 2020, 06:54:05 PM
This was sunday's project. Starter removed and engine freed up plus all six injectors pulled and replaced. It still runs.


 (https://youtu.be/GVHuJFDGk08)[/Url]
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on April 28, 2020, 07:01:43 PM
This was sunday's project. Starter removed and engine freed up plus all six injectors pulled and replaced. It still runs.


 (https://youtu.be/GVHuJFDGk08)[/Url]

Good job!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on April 28, 2020, 07:38:51 PM
all i can tell is that its a tractor.

what is it?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on April 28, 2020, 09:26:47 PM
Massey Ferguson 1100.  Old as dirt.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on May 08, 2020, 06:05:56 AM
The home alone thing has caused me to mess around in my garage workshop.  At the risk of losing some of my fingers I have made a compass rose.  I really needed that like I needed a paper ass but it was better than going stir crazy.

[Img] P1020815.jpg[img]

As a geritric dummy I have never tried to post a picture or image on this forum. The instructions on the "how to section" are clear enough.  If this does not work I will try again with a different method.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on May 08, 2020, 06:15:56 AM
The home alone thing has caused me to mess around in my garage workshop.  At the risk of losing some of my fingers I have made a compass rose.  I really needed that like I needed a paper ass but it was better than going stir crazy.

[Img] P1020815.jpg[img]

As a geritric dummy I have never tried to post a picture or image on this forum. The instructions on the "how to section" are clear enough.  If this does not work I will try again with a different method.

I would like to see it. The free Imgur service works well for me, so you could try it.

https://imgur.com

You just have to sign up to get  a password.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on May 08, 2020, 06:38:29 AM
OK I will try again..................but I ain't giving up if it fails.

(https://imgur.com/CCjp6dG)

Maybe four or five more tries and I will figure it out.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 08, 2020, 09:20:20 AM
OK I will try again..................but I ain't giving up if it fails.

(https://imgur.com/CCjp6dG)

Maybe four or five more tries and I will figure it out.

Is this a golden star?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 08, 2020, 09:21:09 AM
(https://i.imgur.com/CCjp6dG.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on May 08, 2020, 11:37:30 AM
Icarus, to post an image you need to add a / to the last [/img], like this:

Code: [Select]
[img][/img]
Alternatively, you can click on the Image button, which is this one:

(https://i.imgur.com/Ciuy7v8.png)

That button is a shortcut to the code so you don't have to type it. Much faster and easier.  ;D Just paste the url of the image in and you're all set!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on May 08, 2020, 06:48:44 PM
Thank you for your patience and help.

The new format has found me even less capable.  For example: I can reply only in the quick reply box.  The screen that xSP shows, above, is not accessible to me (unless I get some more instruction). There are no buttons to select with the quick reply box. Duh!

Tank somehow found the picture I was trying to post.  The thing that I built is merely an assortment of wood pieces, Red cedar and white pine. Scraps from my wood pile.  The Trigonometry was fun to tinker with.

The other ongoing project in my workshop is a one meter long radio controlled boat.  It is a model of a racing dinghy.  I have been on a yearlong joint design experiment with  Justinas Rubinovas, my young friend in Lithuania.  I do have considerable experience with naval architecture concepts and have designed and built many boats over the years.  The model is to determine how much sail power we need to apply to cause the boat to plane.  That is a whole other ballgame.  I will try to post some pictures of that project.............if I ever learn to do it correctly.

Once again. Thank you for all the kind help.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 28, 2020, 07:16:23 PM
A little practice project on keeping things square. A dice.

Cutting the core pieces
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/8246/TvCnuX.jpg)

The core pieces
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/9448/McOksO.jpg)

Inserting the gap filler
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/1492/wzEc0t.jpg)

Assembled core 31mm on a side
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/5119/FvRoGa.jpg)

Face plates 5mm ply with 6mm dowel inserts
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/9103/0iGg2J.jpg)

Assembling face plates to the core
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/2527/4tRWnB.jpg)

Assembling face plates to the core
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/8189/hHL4FY.jpg)

Assembled before finishing
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/8902/FBosGM.jpg)

Assembled before finishing
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/2782/pl3CyH.jpg)

Assembled after finishing
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/223/ai2L0q.jpg)

Assembled after finishing
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/4360/kT1ZYQ.jpg)

All glued.
Good practice :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Magdalena on May 28, 2020, 08:01:35 PM
...

Assembled after finishing
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/4360/kT1ZYQ.jpg)

All glued.
Good practice :)

Wow!  :clapping:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on May 28, 2020, 08:34:19 PM
Cool! Make another and do some gambling with them at home.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 28, 2020, 09:21:53 PM
Cool! Make another and do some gambling with them at home.

The next one will be better :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on May 28, 2020, 10:25:34 PM
Neat exercise, and it looks like you achieved your aim. :smilenod:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 28, 2020, 10:44:13 PM
Neat exercise, and it looks like you achieved your aim. :smilenod:

Yes it did. Learning all the time. :)

Next is mitre joints on all the edges!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on May 28, 2020, 10:53:25 PM
Neat exercise, and it looks like you achieved your aim. :smilenod:

Yes it did. Learning all the time. :)

Next is mitre joints on all the edges!

What kind of saw will you be using to cut the miters?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on May 29, 2020, 05:00:39 AM
Good job! Will you stain and varnish it, or give it a paint job?

I use one of these straight flush trimming router bits to make the job of sanding the slight overlaps of the edges easier. If you own  a router, it's a worthwhile investment.


Is there a smaller die hidden inside? That would make it a Russian loaded die.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 29, 2020, 06:03:11 AM
Neat exercise, and it looks like you achieved your aim. :smilenod:

Yes it did. Learning all the time. :)

Next is mitre joints on all the edges!

What kind of saw will you be using to cut the miters?


Good question. I wish I knew the answer! Any suggestions?

I do have a mitre saw, it's buried among the clamps to the left of this picture. However the dice dimensions were pretty much on the lowest limit of its capabilities. It's also easy to do the first two (possible 3) mitres but the forth could be difficult with the saw. So I'm open to suggestions :)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/8246/TvCnuX.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 29, 2020, 06:15:07 AM
Good job! Will you stain and varnish it, or give it a paint job?

Don't know yet but probably not this piece. Still learning about the mechanics of the wood and glue at this point.

I use one of these straight flush trimming router bits to make the job of sanding the slight overlaps of the edges easier. If you own  a router, it's a worthwhile investment.

I have a router but it's not a table router. However it's going to be my next experiment :)

Is there a smaller die hidden inside? That would make it a Russian loaded die.

There is a six sided core, but that is now glued firmly inside and is part of the structure. The faces are glued to it and each other.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on May 29, 2020, 07:34:37 AM
I use one of these straight flush trimming router bits to make the job of sanding the slight overlaps of the edges easier. If you own  a router, it's a worthwhile investment.

I have a router but it's not a table router. However it's going to be my next experiment :)

I only have a hand-held el cheapo Bosch POF 400 router, but it works for my projects.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 29, 2020, 09:49:39 AM
I use one of these straight flush trimming router bits to make the job of sanding the slight overlaps of the edges easier. If you own  a router, it's a worthwhile investment.

I have a router but it's not a table router. However it's going to be my next experiment :)

I only have a hand-held el cheapo Bosch POF 400 router, but it works for my projects.

Without checking I think I have the same router!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on May 30, 2020, 12:59:00 AM
...

Assembled after finishing
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/4360/kT1ZYQ.jpg)

All glued.
Good practice :)

That's really good! 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on May 30, 2020, 01:32:01 AM
Neat exercise, and it looks like you achieved your aim. :smilenod:

Yes it did. Learning all the time. :)

Next is mitre joints on all the edges!

What kind of saw will you be using to cut the miters?


Good question. I wish I knew the answer! Any suggestions?

I do have a mitre saw, it's buried among the clamps to the left of this picture. However the dice dimensions were pretty much on the lowest limit of its capabilities. It's also easy to do the first two (possible 3) mitres but the forth could be difficult with the saw. So I'm open to suggestions :)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/8246/TvCnuX.jpg)

If it were me, I'd buy a block the size I needed or just cut a cube from a larger piece. I guess the original intent was to figure out some building details so that ultimately you wouldn't be seeing any end grain? There's a guy at the posted website who came up with a slick way of making a box that folds up. If you don't want the die hollow, use some wood with little figure, like lime, and then drill the holes and drip in colored epoxy. The epoxy will fill the holes and have a meniscus, which might be an interesting feature. I'd also use a drill template so that the wood on the faces doesn't tear out when the drill bites. Or use brad-point bits. Do you have a drill press?

Here's a link to his example of making a box with miters and then gluing it and folding it closed.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/BritBoxmaker/blog/17048

That guy is absolute aces at making intricate wood boxes. I'm not even close to that good, sadly.

What is you ultimate intent with the dice, if I may ask?

BTW, I post there as Dark_Lightning. Imagine that. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on May 30, 2020, 05:02:21 AM
Thanks, DL, that looks like a site I would want to explore, even to just get ideas!

Tank, I have something you may consider making: a Yoshimoto cube. It looks like a party trick, but it is real and can be made out of wood if one is patient enough. It's been on my list for a while, but I am probably too klutzy for something this refined.


There are many other videos on Yoshimoto cubes on YouTube, some with instructions.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on May 30, 2020, 05:45:36 AM
Self quarantine in my garage workshop  keeps me doing fun stuff while neglecting the minor repairs that my house needs.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 30, 2020, 09:06:46 AM
...
If it were me, I'd buy a block the size I needed or just cut a cube from a larger piece. I guess the original intent was to figure out some building details so that ultimately you wouldn't be seeing any end grain?

The dice was a practice piece to experiment with materials, 90° angles and PVA glue. Creating the dice was just a target.

There's a guy at the posted website who came up with a slick way of making a box that folds up. If you don't want the die hollow, use some wood with little figure, like lime, and then drill the holes and drip in colored epoxy. The epoxy will fill the holes and have a meniscus, which might be an interesting feature.

This dice wasn't hollow because I wanted to see how small a cube I could make with the saw I have. And then that cube formed the core to fix the faces to. It also meant that the faces had a back which would support the dowel 'dots'.

I'd also use a drill template so that the wood on the faces doesn't tear out when the drill bites. Or use brad-point bits. Do you have a drill press?

I have some 3mm aluminium plate which i could use to make a temple. I have a 6mm spade bit on order. I don't have a drill press at the moment. I'm looking at a Clarke 12 speed at £180. But I'm torn between that and a powered mitre saw for about £100. Cost isn't a particular issue, but space is. I think the drill press will have to fixed while I could move the saw around when I need it.

Here's a link to his example of making a box with miters and then gluing it and folding it closed.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/BritBoxmaker/blog/17048

That guy is absolute aces at making intricate wood boxes. I'm not even close to that good, sadly.

Thanks I shall watch that with interest.

What is you ultimate intent with the dice, if I may ask?

Just a test/practice  piece

BTW, I post there as Dark_Lightning. Imagine that. :)

I may see you there. Thanks for your input :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 30, 2020, 09:09:35 AM
Thanks, DL, that looks like a site I would want to explore, even to just get ideas!

Tank, I have something you may consider making: a Yoshimoto cube. It looks like a party trick, but it is real and can be made out of wood if one is patient enough. It's been on my list for a while, but I am probably too klutzy for something this refined.


There are many other videos on Yoshimoto cubes on YouTube, some with instructions.

I shall watch the with interest.

The problem I have at the moment is finding a source of the right specialist tools and materials. I have found a cabinet maker tool supplier. But wood is a bit more problematic at the moment.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on May 30, 2020, 09:12:47 AM
Self quarantine in my garage workshop  keeps me doing fun stuff while neglecting the minor repairs that my house needs.

:rofl: You too!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 05, 2020, 06:13:45 PM
The result of Hermes suggestion. Looking forward to doing Dice V2 :D


The router
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/4039/ofjpSf.jpg)

Table finished router not fitted
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/7214/mDsIKw.jpg)

Assembled underside
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/4994/R8tydG.jpg)

Assembled top
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/3244/v2EbT4.jpg)

Router head detail
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/756/uOcFU6.jpg)

The result of testing!  ;D
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/5627/Z0LHPZ.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 05, 2020, 06:50:53 PM
Mine is the 400 A, but looks almost identical — probably not as powerful as your 500. I like your setup! Dave would have been impressed.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 05, 2020, 09:22:49 PM
Nice router and table! Have you used a router much before? One thing I'd recommend is to use a jig to hold the dice to keep your fingers away from that mincemeat maker. Is the router open for air flow at the chuck end? I made a sheet metal cover that lets it breathe but keeps dust out of the motor for my router.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 05, 2020, 09:34:57 PM
Nice router and table! Have you used a router much before?

No, I bought it for one specific job and its sat on the shelf until now.

Quote
One thing I'd recommend is to use a jig to hold the dice to keep your fingers away from that mincemeat maker.

Noted. I have been considering how I was going to hold the work piece!

Quote
Is the router open for air flow at the chuck end? I made a sheet metal cover that lets it breathe but keeps dust out of the motor for my router.

The sawdust flows over the table top away from the router motor. So it's out of the way.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on June 19, 2020, 02:42:12 AM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 19, 2020, 04:50:20 AM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

True! It only matters that the cut is made, since the router bit is round, (if that makes sense). I've used massive muscle control on some things that I've run through the router or table saw that I would have been better served by making the proper fixturing. I still have my digits, but I'll be honest and admit that some parts luckily grew back. Fingertips and edges, and fingernails, to be precise. I've used and abused my hands my whole life. Now that they are arthritic and in most cases the scars are obscured by other scars, I'm regretting it. I've also had parts being machined thrown across the room by said machine, and in the case of a piece of wood I was cutting a few months ago, kicked back into my arm with a really nice chunk of flesh flayed back. It would be nice if wood working equipment could be engineered like metal working equipment, in terms of restraint of the work piece. I'm making a wood carving that way currently, in the sense that it is restrained. It's held down with screws. Flip side of that is that I'm using chisels and a mallet, and I'd better be damned careful that none of my anatomy is in the path of those chisels, as I keep them razor-sharp. I've cut myself many times in a moment of inattention.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 19, 2020, 05:17:03 AM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

True! It only matters that the cut is made, since the router bit is round, (if that makes sense). I've used massive muscle control on some things that I've run through the router or table saw that I would have been better served by making the proper fixturing. I still have my digits, but I'll be honest and admit that some parts luckily grew back. Fingertips and edges, and fingernails, to be precise. I've used and abused my hands my whole life. Now that they are arthritic and in most cases the scars are obscured by other scars, I'm regretting it. I've also had parts being machined thrown across the room by said machine, and in the case of a piece of wood I was cutting a few months ago, kicked back into my arm with a really nice chunk of flesh flayed back. It would be nice if wood working equipment could be engineered like metal working equipment, in terms of restraint of the work piece. I'm making a wood carving that way currently, in the sense that it is restrained. It's held down with screws. Flip side of that is that I'm using chisels and a mallet, and I'd better be damned careful that none of my anatomy is in the path of those chisels, as I keep them razor-sharp. I've cut myself many times in a moment of inattention.

I've seen some YouTube chisel sharpening tips, but never tried any of them. What is your favourite sharpening technique?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 19, 2020, 02:11:28 PM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

True! It only matters that the cut is made, since the router bit is round, (if that makes sense). I've used massive muscle control on some things that I've run through the router or table saw that I would have been better served by making the proper fixturing. I still have my digits, but I'll be honest and admit that some parts luckily grew back. Fingertips and edges, and fingernails, to be precise. I've used and abused my hands my whole life. Now that they are arthritic and in most cases the scars are obscured by other scars, I'm regretting it. I've also had parts being machined thrown across the room by said machine, and in the case of a piece of wood I was cutting a few months ago, kicked back into my arm with a really nice chunk of flesh flayed back. It would be nice if wood working equipment could be engineered like metal working equipment, in terms of restraint of the work piece. I'm making a wood carving that way currently, in the sense that it is restrained. It's held down with screws. Flip side of that is that I'm using chisels and a mallet, and I'd better be damned careful that none of my anatomy is in the path of those chisels, as I keep them razor-sharp. I've cut myself many times in a moment of inattention.

I've seen some YouTube chisel sharpening tips, but never tried any of them. What is your favourite sharpening technique?

I used to use wet-or-dry sandpaper on a sheet of glass on my bench chisels, but got lazy and bought on of these-

https://www.rockler.com/work-sharp-ws3000-tool-sharpener?sid=V91040&promo=shopping&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=&utm_campaign=PL&tid=pla&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_9TK0feN6gIVdiCtBh0NgwIREAQYAyABEgKsFPD_BwE

I bought the leather disc for honing my carving tools, but on advice about the leather having too much give, I switched to a cardboard disc. The leather can give, and the tool can end up with a rounded edge.

I can't take the machine to my carving class, so I hone them the old-fashioned way on a strop, if they need it. The leather on this is pretty hards, and the inverted "vees" work great for honing the V-tools. https://www.dickblick.com/products/flexcut-slipstrop/?clickTracking=true&wmcp=pla&wmcid=items&wmckw=34214-1001&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIyPWnsvmN6gIVNx6tBh3yZADUEAQYBCABEgJt5PD_BwE
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 19, 2020, 02:18:00 PM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

True! It only matters that the cut is made, since the router bit is round, (if that makes sense). I've used massive muscle control on some things that I've run through the router or table saw that I would have been better served by making the proper fixturing. I still have my digits, but I'll be honest and admit that some parts luckily grew back. Fingertips and edges, and fingernails, to be precise. I've used and abused my hands my whole life. Now that they are arthritic and in most cases the scars are obscured by other scars, I'm regretting it. I've also had parts being machined thrown across the room by said machine, and in the case of a piece of wood I was cutting a few months ago, kicked back into my arm with a really nice chunk of flesh flayed back. It would be nice if wood working equipment could be engineered like metal working equipment, in terms of restraint of the work piece. I'm making a wood carving that way currently, in the sense that it is restrained. It's held down with screws. Flip side of that is that I'm using chisels and a mallet, and I'd better be damned careful that none of my anatomy is in the path of those chisels, as I keep them razor-sharp. I've cut myself many times in a moment of inattention.

I've seen some YouTube chisel sharpening tips, but never tried any of them. What is your favourite sharpening technique?

I used to use wet-or-dry sandpaper on a sheet of glass on my bench chisels, but got lazy and bought on of these-

https://www.rockler.com/work-sharp-ws3000-tool-sharpener?sid=V91040&promo=shopping&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=&utm_campaign=PL&tid=pla&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_9TK0feN6gIVdiCtBh0NgwIREAQYAyABEgKsFPD_BwE

I bought the leather disc for honing my carving tools, but on advice about the leather having too much give, I switched to a cardboard disc. The leather can give, and the tool can end up with a rounded edge.

I can't take the machine to my carving class, so I hone them the old-fashioned way on a strop, if they need it. The leather on this is pretty hards, and the inverted "vees" work great for honing the V-tools. https://www.dickblick.com/products/flexcut-slipstrop/?clickTracking=true&wmcp=pla&wmcid=items&wmckw=34214-1001&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIyPWnsvmN6gIVNx6tBh3yZADUEAQYBCABEgJt5PD_BwE

Thanks!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on June 19, 2020, 03:34:51 PM
It helps a lot to have a honing guide. I've used the inexpensive Eclipse style (https://www.amazon.com/eclipse-honing-guide/s?k=eclipse+honing+guide) for a long time, but there are much nicer ones.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 19, 2020, 06:23:39 PM
It helps a lot to have a honing guide. I've used the inexpensive Eclipse style (https://www.amazon.com/eclipse-honing-guide/s?k=eclipse+honing+guide) for a long time, but there are much nicer ones.

I have one of those, but a different brand. I used it on my bench chisels until I got lazy and bought the Work Sharp 3000.  ;D I have 103 (Holy Moley!) carving chisels (I just went and counted) and 18 carving knives. I don't have to sharpen them all at the same time, but the machine makes it a lot quicker, and it's easier to control the chisels if they have a curved profile.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on June 20, 2020, 12:30:15 AM
My recently built sharpening tool is a marvel of accuracy and ability to make old blades new again.  The square block has several grits of wet-or-dry sandpaper.  The finest one on this block is 2000 grit.  A faster abrasive; diamond plates, can be used on the block also.

I did not dream this tool up as a result of my singular brilliance. There are several iterations of the basic concept on You Tube.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on June 20, 2020, 12:53:25 AM
(http://P10200823.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 20, 2020, 07:16:27 AM
Code: [Select]
[quote author=Icarus link=topic=15190.msg403185#msg403185 date=1592610805]
[img]http://P10200823.jpg[/img]
[/quote]

That's not going to work as 'HTTP://' says this is on the internet and 'P10200823.jpg' says this is a file (an image).

You're missing a crucial bit that fits between the two that says where on the internet the file can be found.

For example
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3345/JNid6i.jpg

This is the link to, or URL (Uniform Resource Locator (https://www.verisign.com/en_US/website-presence/online/what-is-a-url/index.xhtml)) which tells your browser where to go to get the file so: On the Internet, here, this file.

As the file is an image you have to tell your browser what to do with the file so here you add 'tags', which are instructions, in this case: [IMG]URL[/IMG]

Thus this: [img]https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3345/JNid6i.jpg[/img]

Will do this:
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3345/JNid6i.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on June 20, 2020, 12:34:29 PM
My recently built sharpening tool is a marvel of accuracy and ability to make old blades new again.  The square block has several grits of wet-or-dry sandpaper.  The finest one on this block is 2000 grit.  A faster abrasive; diamond plates, can be used on the block also.

I did not dream this tool up as a result of my singular brilliance. There are several iterations of the basic concept on You Tube.

pitchers!

im always disatisfied with sharpening things
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 20, 2020, 02:55:44 PM

I made a cover to stop the veneer splitting
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/7800/M2O4KU.jpg)

It worked perfectly. I made the 6 a hexagon to keep the holes as far apart as possible. It also made the dice a bit unusual.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/7433/7NbJu9.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/7544/Z6z23J.jpg)

I then used the guided router bit as Hermes suggested
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/5755/Zlalk2.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/6044/E0lbdL.jpg)


I'd already made a back stop for the router. Very basic but functional.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/2634/r9632n.jpg)

Rebates perfectly :)
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/6714/AxiJCs.jpg)

My son sent the perfect fathers day card :D
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/7808/cEp7OO.jpg)

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on June 20, 2020, 03:03:08 PM
My son sent the perfect fathers day card :D
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/7808/cEp7OO.jpg)

:lol:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 20, 2020, 04:40:54 PM
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/6044/E0lbdL.jpg)

That router bit does an excellent edge trimming job.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 20, 2020, 05:50:38 PM
Don't feel bad about using a board for a router fence, Tank. I've been doing wood working for decades and only got a real router table with a fence last year. You're doing some nice work there!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 20, 2020, 06:41:21 PM
Wood works fine for the fence :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 20, 2020, 06:58:43 PM
Tank, is that die a true cube, or does it just look distorted in the photo?

Oh, I see now how you are going to put it together. With the other plywood faces on it's going to be cubic. Silly me.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 20, 2020, 07:13:20 PM
Tank, is that die a true cube, or does it just look distorted in the photo?

Oh, I see now how you are going to put it together. With the other plywood faces on it's going to be cubic. Silly me.

As you say it ends up a cube. I'm mainly practising making things accurately and square at the moment :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 20, 2020, 07:16:54 PM
Your 6 face has an unusual arrangement of dots. I've never seen that pattern, but I like it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Magdalena on June 20, 2020, 08:31:36 PM
My son sent the perfect fathers day card :D
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/7808/cEp7OO.jpg)
:snicker: Perfect.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 20, 2020, 10:07:31 PM
Your 6 face has an unusual arrangement of dots. I've never seen that pattern, but I like it.

On the original dice the dowel holes on the 6 were so close to each other that the veneer lifted between them. By putting the dowels in a hexagon they are wider apart.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on June 21, 2020, 01:55:17 AM
Tank. Thank you for the instruction at post 581.  I will work on that.  I have not had any particular difficulty when posting on another forum or in my E-mails.  I do struggle with the HAF forum as is obvious.  I have transferred my photos from my camera to my photo app, Lumix, then to another transfer to Imgur.

I just learned that Imgur gives my photo a different name.  In the case I sought to post the photo, the apparent name of the file is HjORjzg-imgur.jpg.  Not sure whether the O symbol is a number or a letter. 

Is that what I am to insert between the two [img] brackets? ..................

When I want to add a picture or drawing to an E-mail, all I need do is click the paper clip and go to the photo file or scanned file and select it.   It magically attaches itself to my e mail letter. Whooo eeee I have mastered that process but am apparenty too brain dead to  figure out the HAF process.

In any case, Thank you one and all for your patience. 

Billy, I will continue to try to post a pic and a drawing of the simple sharpening rig. ( as soon as i get over the embarrassment)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 21, 2020, 03:50:23 AM
Tank. Thank you for the instruction at post 581.  I will work on that.  I have not had any particular difficulty when posting on another forum or in my E-mails.  I do struggle with the HAF forum as is obvious.  I have transferred my photos from my camera to my photo app, Lumix, then to another transfer to Imgur.

I just learned that Imgur gives my photo a different name.  In the case I sought to post the photo, the apparent name of the file is HjORjzg-imgur.jpg.  Not sure whether the O symbol is a number or a letter. 

Is that what I am to insert between the two [img] brackets? ..................

When I want to add a picture or drawing to an E-mail, all I need do is click the paper clip and go to the photo file or scanned file and select it.   It magically attaches itself to my e mail letter. Whooo eeee I have mastered that process but am apparenty too brain dead to  figure out the HAF process.

In any case, Thank you one and all for your patience. 

Billy, I will continue to try to post a pic and a drawing of the simple sharpening rig. ( as soon as i get over the embarrassment)

If you upload a pic to imgur, just click on the picture and then on the button over on the right that says "post in a forum", and then paste that character string into your post. You can get into trouble with gifs and videos, but that's a different animal. We'll get you into this century, yet!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 21, 2020, 08:39:02 AM
Tank. Thank you for the instruction at post 581.  I will work on that.  I have not had any particular difficulty when posting on another forum or in my E-mails.  I do struggle with the HAF forum as is obvious.  I have transferred my photos from my camera to my photo app, Lumix, then to another transfer to Imgur.

I just learned that Imgur gives my photo a different name.  In the case I sought to post the photo, the apparent name of the file is HjORjzg-imgur.jpg.  Not sure whether the O symbol is a number or a letter. 

Is that what I am to insert between the two [img] brackets? ..................

When I want to add a picture or drawing to an E-mail, all I need do is click the paper clip and go to the photo file or scanned file and select it.   It magically attaches itself to my e mail letter. Whooo eeee I have mastered that process but am apparenty too brain dead to  figure out the HAF process.

In any case, Thank you one and all for your patience. 

Billy, I will continue to try to post a pic and a drawing of the simple sharpening rig. ( as soon as i get over the embarrassment)

You'll need the full Imgur URL from http... to ...jpg otherwise your browser won't know where to go and what to retrieve.

You put all of that URL between the image tags so [img]Whole URL[/img] will work
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 21, 2020, 10:40:32 AM
Tank. Thank you for the instruction at post 581.  I will work on that.  I have not had any particular difficulty when posting on another forum or in my E-mails.  I do struggle with the HAF forum as is obvious.  I have transferred my photos from my camera to my photo app, Lumix, then to another transfer to Imgur.

I just learned that Imgur gives my photo a different name.  In the case I sought to post the photo, the apparent name of the file is HjORjzg-imgur.jpg.  Not sure whether the O symbol is a number or a letter. 

Is that what I am to insert between the two [img] brackets? ..................

When I want to add a picture or drawing to an E-mail, all I need do is click the paper clip and go to the photo file or scanned file and select it.   It magically attaches itself to my e mail letter. Whooo eeee I have mastered that process but am apparenty too brain dead to  figure out the HAF process.

In any case, Thank you one and all for your patience. 

Billy, I will continue to try to post a pic and a drawing of the simple sharpening rig. ( as soon as i get over the embarrassment)

You'll need the full Imgur URL from http... to ...jpg otherwise your browser won't know where to go and what to retrieve.

You put all of that URL between the image tags so [img]Whole URL[/img] will work

Click on the photo in Imgur. The following window will pop up:

(https://i.imgur.com/lRh2TEw.jpg)

Left-click on the second blue Copy button from the bottom to copy the BBCode. Then, in the HAF message you are composing, right-click to paste the image code directly into the message.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on June 22, 2020, 01:23:53 AM
You gentlemen are being admirably patient with me.  I will, with your help, and my ignorant determination,  deliver myself into the 21 first century as DL suggests.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on June 22, 2020, 02:07:54 AM
in my opinion the 21st century is overrated. large portions of it remain irrelevant to my interests.

im hard pressed to think of innovations in this century that i could not do without. lots of them i prefer to without.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 22, 2020, 02:56:00 AM
You gentlemen are being admirably patient with me.  I will, with your help, and my ignorant determination,  deliver myself into the 21 first century as DL suggests.

OK, do you have an imgur account with pictures in it, yet?

Once you get there, and copy a link, it will look like this: https://i.imgur.com/m5anmZk.jpg, except that I took the "img" from the front of the url, and the "/img" from the end, so that a picture doesn't actually get displayed here, for clarity. Hopefully this shows like I expect. There should be brackets on the items in quoted, but they have to be omitted to display what is going on. To the uninitiated, this may be even more confusing.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on June 22, 2020, 05:38:28 AM
You gentlemen are being admirably patient with me.  I will, with your help, and my ignorant determination,  deliver myself into the 21 first century as DL suggests.

OK, do you have an imgur account with pictures in it, yet?

Once you get there, and copy a link, it will look like this: https://i.imgur.com/m5anmZk.jpg, except that I took the "img" from the front of the url, and the "/img" from the end, so that a picture doesn't actually get displayed here, for clarity. Hopefully this shows like I expect. There should be brackets on the items in quoted, but they have to be omitted to display what is going on. To the uninitiated, this may be even more confusing.

The easiest way to handle such instruction is to use the code tags available in the forum software. This works for both active links and BB Code (forum tags). For instance, if I want to give the address of a site, but show the details without it being an active link, I'd put code tags around it. The button on the text editing page that will populate some code tags has a hashmark (#) on it. In your text entry box the tags look like this: [code]  [/code]

In use, the text you enter between the code tags remains only text, and won't produce the result it would outside code tags. So for an image address you'd see the following:

Code: [Select]
https://i.imgur.com/GiAaIDc.jpg
In the same way, if I want to talk to somebody about some forum function that uses tags, I would use the code tags in my description. For instance, if I were telling them about how to embed a video, I'd show the tags like so:

Code: [Select]
[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-4TgOz_FQE[/youtube]

***

Now for something completely different--

Taunton Press, the publishers of Fine Woodworking (and Fine Homebuilding), have made a basic video tutorial on hand planes available for free for a limited time. Ten segments, if you include the introduction, probably available for about a week. It'll go back behind a paywall after that.

As I say, it's the basics, but perhaps some may find it informative. I've been reading both those magazines off and on for a couple of decades, and can vouch for the material.

"Ep 1 – Fundamentals of Handplanes: Intro" | Fine Woodworking (https://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/10/04/ep-1-fundamentals-handplanes-intro)


Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 22, 2020, 01:28:42 PM
...

Now for something completely different--

Taunton Press, the publishers of Fine Woodworking (and Fine Homebuilding), have made a basic video tutorial on hand planes available for free for a limited time. Ten segments, if you include the introduction, probably available for about a week. It'll go back behind a paywall after that.

As I say, it's the basics, but perhaps some may find it informative. I've been reading both those magazines off and on for a couple of decades, and can vouch for the material.

"Ep 1 – Fundamentals of Handplanes: Intro" | Fine Woodworking (https://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/10/04/ep-1-fundamentals-handplanes-intro)

Well that was very interesting and at the same time thoroughly depressing.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on June 22, 2020, 03:28:53 PM
Why was it depressing for you, Tank?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 22, 2020, 04:23:45 PM
I've subscribed to Fine Woodworking for decades. I think I have an account or membership at the site. I'll have to check that hand plane tutorial out. I can always learn something.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 22, 2020, 04:25:51 PM
Why was it depressing for you, Tank?

It show what an amateur I am :(
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Randy on June 22, 2020, 04:37:23 PM
Why was it depressing for you, Tank?

It show what an amateur I am :(
We were all amateurs at some point. You'll get there. Besides, you are doing a fine job. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 22, 2020, 04:53:46 PM
Why was it depressing for you, Tank?

It show what an amateur I am :(

I get the same feeling when I look at the works of real artists and then consider what I have produced. If people express admiration for my stuff, I feel like a charlatan.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 22, 2020, 05:55:25 PM
Why was it depressing for you, Tank?

It show what an amateur I am :(
We were all amateurs at some point. You'll get there. Besides, you are doing a fine job. :)

Well I'm getting better :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on June 22, 2020, 06:27:06 PM
Why was it depressing for you, Tank?

It show what an amateur I am :(

You're opening up new vistas for yourself, of skills and equipment. Think of the toys you'll convince yourself you need, and the fun you'll have learning to use them effectively.  ;D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on June 22, 2020, 08:22:51 PM
Why was it depressing for you, Tank?

It show what an amateur I am :(

Aw Tank. :therethere:

If it's any consolation, I couldn't cut a line if I tried, let alone a square or a wooden die!  ;) You're going to learn how to do new things really quickly, you'll see!  ;D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 22, 2020, 11:14:55 PM
Why was it depressing for you, Tank?

It show what an amateur I am :(

I get the same feeling when I look at the works of real artists and then consider what I have produced. If people express admiration for my stuff, I feel like a charlatan.

It's the same for me with wood carving. I know that I have a ways to go to get to the skill level I aspire to. But I've only been carving "in earnest" for a few hours a week for the last five years, and most of it is self-taught. I'm doing more now, at home than I was before the lock down.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on June 22, 2020, 11:26:59 PM
I get the same feeling when I look at the works of real artists and then consider what I have produced. If people express admiration for my stuff, I feel like a charlatan.

and yet van gogh never sold a painting in his life and ended up blowing his brains out in a stinking corn field

i am not suggestng that you follow him, but im pointingout that in the end successful art is an expression of an inner space, and sometimes the artist himself is least qualified to evaluate what he has produced.

seriously/.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 23, 2020, 09:12:59 AM
Continuing the 'getting things square' theme I considered making a chess board. Thank goodness I didn't have enough dark wood! There are 64 squares on a chess board. But I did have enough dark wood to make a Noughts & Crosses (Tic, Tac, Toe) board. I finished the board with 40, 80, 120, 180, 240 grit machine sanding and then some 600 grit by hand. Then coated it in linseed oil.

Getting the pieces of wood adequately square was 'fun'. I made a jig to hold the wood and then tried the router. It throws little bits of wood quite a distance! But the jig worked if I used a saw so it wasn't a waste. Glued the three columns first then got those square on the mating edges and then glued the columns together. It's about 4" on a side.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/7745/KXeGZv.jpg)

Unfinished
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/1773/IsIVtO.jpg)

Finished.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/3268/ubfZTG.jpg)

This is the first project that as ended up basically as intended.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 23, 2020, 10:15:36 AM
It looks good, Tank. You know what's coming next? If she does not have one yet, your wife is going to demand you make her a butcher's block in one form or another for the kitchen.

https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk00oH_LB-2rlJqDdEC7BuNfjgeZ-CA:1592903553233&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=butchers+block&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPms6TzJfqAhUxoXEKHf9nBUoQ7Al6BAgGEEM&biw=1876&bih=936
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 23, 2020, 10:20:52 AM
It looks good, Tank. You know what's coming next? If she does not have one yet, your wife is going to demand you make her a butcher's block in one form or another for the kitchen.

https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk00oH_LB-2rlJqDdEC7BuNfjgeZ-CA:1592903553233&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=butchers+block&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPms6TzJfqAhUxoXEKHf9nBUoQ7Al6BAgGEEM&biw=1876&bih=936

Fortunately my wife would never want one of those  :rofl:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 23, 2020, 12:02:36 PM
It looks good, Tank. You know what's coming next? If she does not have one yet, your wife is going to demand you make her a butcher's block in one form or another for the kitchen.

https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk00oH_LB-2rlJqDdEC7BuNfjgeZ-CA:1592903553233&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=butchers+block&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPms6TzJfqAhUxoXEKHf9nBUoQ7Al6BAgGEEM&biw=1876&bih=936

Fortunately my wife would never want one of those  :rofl:

You're safe for now.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 23, 2020, 12:48:28 PM
It looks good, Tank. You know what's coming next? If she does not have one yet, your wife is going to demand you make her a butcher's block in one form or another for the kitchen.

https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk00oH_LB-2rlJqDdEC7BuNfjgeZ-CA:1592903553233&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=butchers+block&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPms6TzJfqAhUxoXEKHf9nBUoQ7Al6BAgGEEM&biw=1876&bih=936

Fortunately my wife would never want one of those  :rofl:

You're safe for now.

Well I'm still considering doing a chess board. The trick is how to make 64 consistent tiles?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 23, 2020, 01:33:15 PM
It looks good, Tank. You know what's coming next? If she does not have one yet, your wife is going to demand you make her a butcher's block in one form or another for the kitchen.

https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ALeKk00oH_LB-2rlJqDdEC7BuNfjgeZ-CA:1592903553233&source=univ&tbm=isch&q=butchers+block&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjPms6TzJfqAhUxoXEKHf9nBUoQ7Al6BAgGEEM&biw=1876&bih=936

Fortunately my wife would never want one of those  :rofl:

You're safe for now.

Well I'm still considering doing a chess board. The trick is how to make 64 consistent tiles?

I would take the wimp's way out and either ask one of my local timber suppliers to cut them, because they can do it amazingly accurately, or get our guys to cut them on a CNC machine in the factory.
You will probably say real men do it with their own tools at home!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on June 23, 2020, 01:36:07 PM
i remember when i was a kid in britain hearing that one of the tests for apprentice machinists was to take a piece of metal and file it into a cube by hand. ìcould not do that

your chezsboard is 64 times more d ifficultthan that
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on June 23, 2020, 01:47:12 PM
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 23, 2020, 02:11:37 PM
i remember when i was a kid in britain hearing that one of the tests for apprentice machinists was to take a piece of metal and file it into a cube by hand. ìcould not do that

your chezsboard is 64 times more d ifficultthan that

Not necessarily. For the tiles I just need two strips of different coloured wood of a consistent thickness and width. All I need to do then is cut pieces off them that are the same length as the width.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 23, 2020, 02:13:36 PM

Thanks, but I'm not going to watch this until after I've done mine.  :grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 23, 2020, 02:54:01 PM
I didn't watch the video, but if I were to make a chess board I'd make two long sticks that were square in cross section and lop off pieces. Trying to square each piece is for masochists.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on June 23, 2020, 03:43:43 PM
i remember when i was a kid in britain hearing that one of the tests for apprentice machinists was to take a piece of metal and file it into a cube by hand. ìcould not do that

your chezsboard is 64 times more d ifficultthan that

Not necessarily. For the tiles I just need two strips of different coloured wood of a consistent thickness and width. All I need to do then is cut pieces off them that are the same length as the width.

so it's only 32 times more difficult?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 23, 2020, 06:41:25 PM
I didn't watch the video, but if I were to make a chess board I'd make two long sticks that were square in cross section and lop off pieces. Trying to square each piece is for masochists.

But if you do that the grain is running the wrong way. Anyway I went to the wood supplier and got some plank off cuts. Got some mahogany and oak. Cut the oak into tiles then the mahogany tiles. Found out for some reason the mahogany tiles were smaller than the oak tiles  :o Fortunately I had a lot more oak than mahogany so I did another set of oak tiles.

I have a 1/3 sheet orbital sander. Would I see a better waste removal performance from a random orbit sander? I'm not that fussed about finish as I always finish by hand.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 23, 2020, 06:43:29 PM
i remember when i was a kid in britain hearing that one of the tests for apprentice machinists was to take a piece of metal and file it into a cube by hand. ìcould not do that

your chezsboard is 64 times more d ifficultthan that

Not necessarily. For the tiles I just need two strips of different coloured wood of a consistent thickness and width. All I need to do then is cut pieces off them that are the same length as the width.

so it's only 32 times more difficult?

? why ?

I'll glue all the bits together and then finish the top surface and edges.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 23, 2020, 07:34:51 PM
I didn't watch the video, but if I were to make a chess board I'd make two long sticks that were square in cross section and lop off pieces. Trying to square each piece is for masochists.

But if you do that the grain is running the wrong way. Anyway I went to the wood supplier and got some plank off cuts. Got some mahogany and oak. Cut the oak into tiles then the mahogany tiles. Found out for some reason the mahogany tiles were smaller than the oak tiles  :o Fortunately I had a lot more oak than mahogany so I did another set of oak tiles.

I have a 1/3 sheet orbital sander. Would I see a better waste removal performance from a random orbit sander? I'm not that fussed about finish as I always finish by hand.

I happen to like the end grain look. To each their own. If I understand the orbital sander, it spins only, right? If so, I would use the random orbital sander to minimize digging in with the other one.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 23, 2020, 09:43:20 PM
Nice little bunch of off cuts for next to nothing.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/585/tKYlWe.jpg)


The back of the board still in pieces. The better faces are obviously on the other side.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/2334/RgMi4W.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 23, 2020, 10:52:12 PM
Nice little bunch of off cuts for next to nothing.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/585/tKYlWe.jpg)


The back of the board still in pieces. The better faces are obviously on the other side.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/2334/RgMi4W.jpg)

The board is looking good, so far! Is that first piece of wood standing on edge mahogany? That's quite a haul.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 24, 2020, 08:31:04 AM
4 pieces of mahogany, 3 pieces of oak (I already had some of that) and two pieces of cedar. And as I make small bits and pieces at the moment to buy pieces (if I could get them) this size it would be exorbitant.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 24, 2020, 03:48:56 PM
England has all those trees! Hard to believe wood is hard to find. Or at least reasonably priced wood. I've spent hundreds of dollars at the wood boutiques like Rockler and Woodcraft. They generally get the higher quality wood. I bought some nicely figured maple at $9 for a piece 3" X 1/4" X 2'. That's $72 a board foot! :( I found equivalent quality at a local store for $3 a piece, so that's only $24 a board foot. :rolleyes: I bought all they had! Still exorbitant, though. But if I buy it and have to resaw, plane and sand it, it's worth it. A piece of mahogany like the one I asked about (looks to be about 3" X 4" in cross-section) would run about $45 at Woodcraft. I can get it for about $30 at a lumber place not too far from them, though. It's the nearest place, at ~39 miles.

My wife makes quilts. That's an even more expensive hobby. Her newest sewing machine (she has 6 or so) retails for $16k. That's more money than I have in all of my tools- carving, automotive repair, gardening implements and metal working. Crazy. Material is $20 a yard for decent stuff.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on June 30, 2020, 07:55:47 PM
Been building boxes again  ;D
This time practical ones. My kids got me a voucher for a hardware store (B&Q) so I put it towards a new toy, a belt sander. It didn't have a case so I built one.

Built not finished.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/7610/TmNZYu.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/230/c3bJSu.jpg)

I used the box to practice varnishing.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3894/UbBNvw.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/8623/ChG1se.jpg)

So having done that I had just enough plywood left to build a box for the palm sander I already had. As you can see I learned my lesson from the lid of the other box!  :snicker1: I'm not varnishing this one. It was a great exercise on my new circular saw. I made paper pattern pieces for the layout on the plywood to make sure it all fitted and to minimise the cuts. Got all the cuts millimetre accurate and square. So getting better :)
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/8413/oWCuYB.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/9969/yN074I.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on June 30, 2020, 10:06:55 PM
Yes, definitely improving! Next you're going to need a really large cabinet on one wall to hold all the goodies.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on June 30, 2020, 10:33:16 PM
when i see you do that stuff i don't know what to say.

i had all my tools jammed into a small roll away under a simple 9-drawer toolbox. no room. everything was jumbled in.

so i went and bought a big rollaway, with some 12 drawers and a big toolchest on top with some 8 more drawers.

now that and the old one still leaves me disorganized. i have concluded its a mental disability that keeps my tools filed randomly, and not a lack of space.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 01, 2020, 05:11:44 AM
I have exactly the same grey plastic Vernier calipers. One day I hope to own an electronic one.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 01, 2020, 07:16:50 AM
when i see you do that stuff i don't know what to say.

i had all my tools jammed into a small roll away under a simple 9-drawer toolbox. no room. everything was jumbled in.

so i went and bought a big rollaway, with some 12 drawers and a big toolchest on top with some 8 more drawers.

now that and the old one still leaves me disorganized. i have concluded its a mental disability that keeps my tools filed randomly, and not a lack of space.

I'm not naturally tidy but I get annoyed if I can't find things. Multiply that with the small area I have to work in and if I wasn't tidy I'd disappear in a pile of tools! So I have a double motivation  :grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 01, 2020, 07:20:42 AM
I have exactly the same grey plastic Vernier calipers. One day I hope to own an electronic one.

I have an electronic pair as well. I think I paid £18 for them, or thereabouts. They are very useful. They have a little locking mechanism so you can set them to a measurement and then directly transfer that distance to the work piece.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 01, 2020, 07:27:38 AM
Has anybody had any direct experience of using a stationary belt/disc sander like this?

Pros and cons?

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/5249/wiBuZa.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 01, 2020, 10:06:21 AM
I have exactly the same grey plastic Vernier calipers. One day I hope to own an electronic one.

I have an electronic pair as well. I think I paid £18 for them, or thereabouts. They are very useful. They have a little locking mechanism so you can set them to a measurement and then directly transfer that distance to the work piece.

I am considering a laser level as well, for hanging shelves on a long wall. I usually just tape a long transparent plastic tube to the wall in a wide U shape filled with water to level things over long distances.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 01, 2020, 02:33:02 PM
Has anybody had any direct experience of using a stationary belt/disc sander like this?

Pros and cons?

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/5249/wiBuZa.jpg)

I have a Delta model that is old enough to be made of cast iron. It doesn't have that nifty dust collection port. They make, as you would expect, a lot of dust. Right handy.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 01, 2020, 09:38:13 PM
That is a standard item in the woodworking shop Tank.  I have one that I use fairly often to create some dust storms from  various parts. 

The pictured item, named Fox, may be one of the better quality machines if it is from the American Shop Fox line of equipment.  The one in the picture is a small one but useful for the small shop or the hobby wood butcher. It can also be used for metals but the sanding disc and belt will not last as long.  The machines range in price from less than a hundred dollars to more than two thousand dollars for an industrial grade machine.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 01, 2020, 10:06:48 PM
Cheers Icarus :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on July 02, 2020, 02:01:29 AM
That's a nice box, Tank. :tellmemore: So, when are you going to get round to building your mansion? :P
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 02, 2020, 07:54:54 AM
That's a nice box, Tank. :tellmemore: So, when are you going to get round to building your mansion? :P

Now that would have to be a log cabin.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 03, 2020, 08:22:58 PM
A smaller project this time. A jewellery box about 90mm on a side. Made of oak with constellation (Plough, Orion, Southern Cross and the Pleiades) inlays made from 4 and 6mm brass rod. Finished with linseed oil.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/9513/O7pTUM.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/6862/JvT5p9.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/9365/3tyDc1.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 03, 2020, 09:18:49 PM
Wow, you're really improving quickly! Nice box, and I like the idea of constellations.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 03, 2020, 09:24:39 PM
Wow, you're really improving quickly! Nice box, and I like the idea of constellations.

I was thinking of how to get some practice with brass. If I did regular patterns I'd be making a rod for my own back in terms of layout. With the constellations if they are a little bit inaccurate you won't notice :)
 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Randy on July 03, 2020, 09:59:30 PM
That's a nice looking box, Tank. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 03, 2020, 10:12:58 PM
i thought they were dominoes of some sort until i saw orion. then i read your text

in america the plough is called the big dipper
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 04, 2020, 04:27:30 AM
That's good an attractive little box. I like those markings on the lid; I assume they are natural.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 04, 2020, 06:44:41 AM
Insomnia. I'm usually comatose at this hour. Anyway, Icarus, what you see in the lid of that box are the signatory medullary rays and flakes of quarter-sawn white oak. I love that wood for that feature.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 04, 2020, 07:22:19 AM
i thought they were dominoes of some sort until i saw orion. then i read your text

in america the plough is called the big dipper

And did you notice something about it?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 04, 2020, 07:23:53 AM
That's good an attractive little box. I like those markings on the lid; I assume they are natural.

Yes. The top and bottom are made from strips cut from a plank and the glued edge on to each other.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 04, 2020, 07:24:39 AM
That's a nice looking box, Tank. :)

Cheers  :cheers:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 04, 2020, 07:26:45 AM
Insomnia. I'm usually comatose at this hour. Anyway, Icarus, what you see in the lid of that box are the signatory medullary rays and flakes of quarter-sawn white oak. I love that wood for that feature.

It adds a nice texture to the finish.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 06, 2020, 03:53:38 PM
Practice piece.

As you may recall I cut the tiles of a chess board and managed to cut the oak ones too big. So I chucked those in my waste wood bin and made some new smaller ones. Well I used 16 of the original large oak pieces to make a 4x4 square to practice getting things square. Well I want to edge my chess board so I edged the 4x4 with some of the mahogany I got. I also want to put a brass inlaid edge around the chess board as well. Which requires routing a rebate for it to fit. This is the finished result.


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/9351/n9rpog.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/3673/NNPd4b.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/256/H9YPKd.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/8341/b9ZPFZ.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/641/bnB3Ic.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/6412/vx5kzg.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/2752/BPaAkH.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/5973/GphZKK.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/7044/8XXSuk.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 06, 2020, 06:50:21 PM
Very nice! How did you miter the brass?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 06, 2020, 09:03:59 PM
can you design a minimalist chess game with that?

say, a king, a knight, a bishop, a pawn . . . with scaled-down capabilities?

and are you going to design chessmen for it?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 06, 2020, 09:28:30 PM
Very nice! How did you miter the brass?

A manual mitre saw. Not expensive. A 24tpi blade for non ferrous metals. You can see it in the middle of this picture.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/8246/TvCnuX.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 06, 2020, 09:30:48 PM
can you design a minimalist chess game with that?

say, a king, a knight, a bishop, a pawn . . . with scaled-down capabilities?

and are you going to design chessmen for it?

It would be fun to try! As I said this is just learning how things work. I'm now trying to find a wood lathe small enough to make chess pieces!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Randy on July 06, 2020, 11:47:20 PM
can you design a minimalist chess game with that?

say, a king, a knight, a bishop, a pawn . . . with scaled-down capabilities?

and are you going to design chessmen for it?

It would be fun to try! As I said this is just learning how things work. I'm now trying to find a wood lathe small enough to make chess pieces!
That would be cool to see! I hope you get to do it!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 07, 2020, 01:39:15 AM
do it, tank

a 16-square chess game might be your contribution to the future

make the knight one square forward, one square left or right, like the traditional pawn

maybe allow the pawn to capture only en passent
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 07, 2020, 04:48:26 AM
can you design a minimal


say, a king, a knight, a bishop, a pawn . . . with scaled-down capabilities?

and are you going to design chessmen for it?

It would be fun to try! As I said this is just learning how things work. I'm now trying to find a wood lathe small enough to make chess pieces!

If you don't want to buy a lathe, you can cobble together a small drill-powered lathe for the occasional small job like chessmen.


You are good at this sort of thing, so it may be worth looking into it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 07, 2020, 04:55:28 AM
I've tried out a product called Froggz Eggz, which is a hand-mouldable thermoplastic. It is a chemical called polycaprolactone. I used it to hold together some screw threads when I was experimenting with a reverse tube for a camera lens.


http://www.pratleyadhesives.com/special-application-products/pratley-frogzeggz-hand-mouldable-plastic

It is made locally by Pratley, but it can be bought in the UK and Europe.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 07, 2020, 07:42:19 AM
do it, tank

a 16-square chess game might be your contribution to the future

make the knight one square forward, one square left or right, like the traditional pawn

maybe allow the pawn to capture only en passent

Explain please?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 07, 2020, 07:43:46 AM
can you design a minimal


say, a king, a knight, a bishop, a pawn . . . with scaled-down capabilities?

and are you going to design chessmen for it?

It would be fun to try! As I said this is just learning how things work. I'm now trying to find a wood lathe small enough to make chess pieces!

If you don't want to buy a lathe, you can cobble together a small drill-powered lathe for the occasional small job like chessmen.


You are good at this sort of thing, so it may be worth looking into it.

That's a good idea. Buy a cheap drill and burn it into the ground.

In fact I've got an old B&D hammer drill where the hammer action doesn't work! I feel my next project coming on. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 07, 2020, 07:48:05 AM
I've tried out a product called Froggz Eggz, which is a hand-mouldable thermoplastic. It is a chemical called polycaprolactone. I used it to hold together some screw threads when I was experimenting with a reverse tube for a camera lens.


http://www.pratleyadhesives.com/special-application-products/pratley-frogzeggz-hand-mouldable-plastic

It is made locally by Pratley, but it can be bought in the UK and Europe.

Interesting. Filed away for future use.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 07, 2020, 09:40:22 AM
can you design a minimal


say, a king, a knight, a bishop, a pawn . . . with scaled-down capabilities?

and are you going to design chessmen for it?

It would be fun to try! As I said this is just learning how things work. I'm now trying to find a wood lathe small enough to make chess pieces!

If you don't want to buy a lathe, you can cobble together a small drill-powered lathe for the occasional small job like chessmen.


You are good at this sort of thing, so it may be worth looking into it.

That's a good idea. Buy a cheap drill and burn it into the ground.

In fact I've got an old B&D hammer drill where the hammer action doesn't work! I feel my next project coming on. :)

I knew that would appeal to you.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 07, 2020, 10:12:19 AM
can you design a minimal


say, a king, a knight, a bishop, a pawn . . . with scaled-down capabilities?

and are you going to design chessmen for it?

It would be fun to try! As I said this is just learning how things work. I'm now trying to find a wood lathe small enough to make chess pieces!

If you don't want to buy a lathe, you can cobble together a small drill-powered lathe for the occasional small job like chessmen.


You are good at this sort of thing, so it may be worth looking into it.

That's a good idea. Buy a cheap drill and burn it into the ground.

In fact I've got an old B&D hammer drill where the hammer action doesn't work! I feel my next project coming on. :)

I knew that would appeal to you.

If you watch it there are loads of other DIY drill lathe designs at the end. Great food for thought!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 07, 2020, 01:34:20 PM
do it, tank

a 16-square chess game might be your contribution to the future

make the knight one square forward, one square left or right, like the traditional pawn

maybe allow the pawn to capture only en passent

Explain please?

in chess, a pawn can make its first move one or two squares, and captures one square ahead and one square to one side or the other. if a pawn moves two spaces and thrrefore moves through an opposing pawns capture zone to land safely6 alongside, the oppozing pawn is allowed to capture it anyway, in passing. but the opposing pawn must do it on the very next turn or forfeit the opportubity.

your chessboard is so small that there isnt space for long legged pieces like a rook or queen. or even for a pawn to capture ahead and to the side. so i was thinking of contracting the pawns capture zone to just the two squarez alongside

maybe 8 pieces is too many anyway
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 07, 2020, 03:46:48 PM
do it, tank

a 16-square chess game might be your contribution to the future

make the knight one square forward, one square left or right, like the traditional pawn

maybe allow the pawn to capture only en passent

Explain please?

in chess, a pawn can make its first move one or two squares, and captures one square ahead and one square to one side or the other. if a pawn moves two spaces and thrrefore moves through an opposing pawns capture zone to land safely6 alongside, the oppozing pawn is allowed to capture it anyway, in passing. but the opposing pawn must do it on the very next turn or forfeit the opportubity.

your chessboard is so small that there isnt space for long legged pieces like a rook or queen. or even for a pawn to capture ahead and to the side. so i was thinking of contracting the pawns capture zone to just the two squarez alongside

maybe 8 pieces is too many anyway
Well that's a rule I didn't know. I learn something new every day. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 07, 2020, 04:34:32 PM
its apparently a fairly new rule. i looked up the history in wiki and they say its 15th century
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 07, 2020, 04:50:46 PM
its apparently a fairly new rule. i looked up the history in wiki and they say its 15th century

I know the rules, but I'm a terrible player, because I lose interest and start thinking about other things. At that point I couldn't care less about winning.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 07, 2020, 05:19:08 PM
More woodworking please.  ;D

I haven't played chess in decades. My only strategy was to take pieces as fast as possible. Anyone with a real strategy would kick my ass. :shrug:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 07, 2020, 05:29:46 PM
its apparently a fairly new rule. i looked up the history in wiki and they say its 15th century

:rofl:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 10, 2020, 05:33:43 PM
Box update.

I do not like countersunk screws except where they are countersunk. So found some small brass pan head screws for visible hinges. They were silly expensive in reasonable quantities for what I will use!

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/2494/Q9wY85.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 10, 2020, 05:47:11 PM
Chessboard update.

I was thinking about how I was going to sand and square up the 64 tiles. Really like these little toggle clamp beasties. So mounted a pair on aboard

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/8198/LlivNT.jpg)

This gadget holds a whole sheet of 'sand' paper down firmly and give a vertical surface to hold the blocks against.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/6039/JrQLzE.jpg)

So I true up the tiles and glue them into sticks of 4. One edge is created o a straight edge which minimises the sanding required. And as these are all playing face down that face is also virtually flat and needs little sanding.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/1082/04fThI.jpg)

16 completed sticks. Truing up the long edges

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/939/AGpYFq.jpg)

Not all sticks trued up yet but looking reasonably ok.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/3627/FZkgjR.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 10, 2020, 06:00:32 PM
Box update.

I do not like countersunk screws except where they are countersunk. So found some small brass pan head screws for visible hinges. They were silly expensive in reasonable quantities for what I will use!

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/2494/Q9wY85.jpg)

Good choice on the screw heads. I think they look better.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tom62 on July 10, 2020, 06:21:03 PM
Wow, cool! The only experiences that I have with workshop stuff is building up Ikea furniture  ;).
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 10, 2020, 07:02:33 PM
Nice! The round heads look much better on the hinges. The flat heads would need a thicker hinge leaf so that the head would be flush with the surface. And yes, brass hardware is stupid expensive.

That chess board is coming along nicely!

Fixed some spelling.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Randy on July 11, 2020, 12:17:30 AM
Please keep us posted on the chess board (and pieces if you can make them). My brother works with wood a lot, or used to. He's never made anything like this. About the only things I can glue together are my fingers.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 11, 2020, 06:10:00 AM
Please keep us posted on the chess board (and pieces if you can make them). My brother works with wood a lot, or used to. He's never made anything like this. About the only things I can glue together are my fingers.

I will be posting progress :)

I'm in two minds about the chess pieces as I don't have a lathe, although Hermes posted a brilliant DIY video 'make your own mini lathe'. Although I might look at created some pieces that are 'Cubist' in nature :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 11, 2020, 09:14:27 PM
Chessboard update :)

Here are the 16 1x4 tile strips laid out and checked to see if they are true and shuffled to the least worst fit.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/5737/3VmKm6.jpg)

These were then fitted together into 4x4 quadrants which were then tweaked so each shared two perpendicular straight edges with their two adjoining quadrants. Two quadrants were then joined and then trued up and these two final assemblies were joined up

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/3602/eQKwKA.jpg)

The final board fully assembled.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/2937/FXTE7T.jpg)

A couple of imperfections. But all in all I'm quite pleased. Next up is levelling the playing surface, truing up the edges and adding the surround.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/6214/WY4gP3.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/6276/Ahn5xx.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 11, 2020, 10:37:16 PM
imperfections?

your life standards are vastly elevated above mine.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Randy on July 12, 2020, 01:11:56 AM
Did you glue each piece separately? If so that must have been painstaking.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 12, 2020, 06:12:38 AM
imperfections?

your life standards are vastly elevated above mine.

I'm just a bit of a perfectionist arsehole  ;D ;D ;D

I suppose the point of a chess board is its regularity. And remember I made it to practice getting thing consistent and square and if you add 64 individual squares together the imperfections multiply so you can see the effects. The thing is the 64 tiles have to be virtually identical. The mistake I made was not keeping the circular saw fence in the same place while cutting the tiles. If I had done that they would have been much more consistent. So lessons learned :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 12, 2020, 06:23:53 AM
Did you glue each piece separately? If so that must have been painstaking.

It is all glued together but it's not that painstaking as you make 16 strips of 4 tiles. Then 4 quadrants of 4 strips. Then 2 halves of 2 quadrants and then you glue those to finish the board.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 15, 2020, 09:26:28 PM
Chessboard finished :)

One edge needed a bit of work so I used a flush cut saw to trim that.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/6581/XaMDZ9.jpg)

Putting on the edging
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/2593/f984zZ.jpg)

Finished to 600 grit
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/6901/48eZsA.jpg)

First coat of linseed oil
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/1706/AKjje6.jpg)

Enough imperfections to be considered 'rustic'  ;D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on July 15, 2020, 10:17:22 PM
Still, it looks really nice. Excellent choices on the wood as well.  :bravo:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 15, 2020, 10:26:48 PM
Bravo! I really like the way linseed oil pops the grain. You did well!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 16, 2020, 04:23:26 AM
It looks good — your patience has paid off. Linseed oil needs repeated applications, sometimes over weeks, because it disappears into the wood slowly.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 16, 2020, 05:16:30 AM
Still, it looks really nice. Excellent choices on the wood as well.  :bravo:

Thank you. Hobson would have been proud of my choice of wood. I have friended my local wood merchant and he lets me scrounge then ends of planks he cuts to length. I can take all I can carry to a tenner, in this case oak and sapele. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 16, 2020, 05:17:41 AM
Bravo! I really like the way linseed oil pops the grain. You did well!

I agree I do like the texture brought out be the linseed oil. And the smell is nice too.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 16, 2020, 05:19:55 AM
It looks good — your patience has paid off. Linseed oil needs repeated applications, sometimes over weeks, because it disappears into the wood slowly.

It does soak in. I am experimenting with finishes and if you leave the linseed oil for a couple of weeks you can then varnish over it. I'm tending to a satin finish as a gloss finish looks too garish and artificial to me.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on July 16, 2020, 07:54:23 AM
Keep tung oil (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tung_oil) in mind in the future. Similar to linseed oil (and the rags from working with it are just as dangerous) but gives a more lustrous finish that is also more durable. If you don't go too many coats, it can have a good satin finish, not too glossy.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 16, 2020, 09:29:51 AM
Keep tung oil (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tung_oil) in mind in the future. Similar to linseed oil (and the rags from working with it are just as dangerous) but gives a more lustrous finish that is also more durable. If you don't go too many coats, it can have a good satin finish, not too glossy.

I got a book about different types of wood finish and tung oil is mentioned. I went for linseed simply because I had some :) I have added tung oil to my woodworking consumable list at Amazon so I don't forget it. I'll look around my other accounts to see if I can get it elsewhere before I but from Amazon, Jeff Bazos gets way too much business as it is :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 16, 2020, 09:43:55 AM
I can't use tung oil as it is derived from a nut. One of my grandsons has a nut allergy. So best not.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 16, 2020, 03:29:06 PM
Still, it looks really nice. Excellent choices on the wood as well.  :bravo:

Thank you. Hobson would have been proud of my choice of wood. I have friended my local wood merchant and he lets me scrounge then ends of planks he cuts to length. I can take all I can carry to a tenner, in this case oak and sapele. :)

Wow, that's a nice deal! There's a shop here in town that I hear does that. I'll check into it once this Covid-19 business "dies down" a bit.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Randy on July 16, 2020, 09:05:06 PM
Looking good, Tank! Looking good.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 16, 2020, 09:06:29 PM
Looking good, Tank! Looking good.

Thank you :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 25, 2020, 01:28:58 PM
Been wood butchering again. This is from 2 pieces of Sapele, which comes in different shades. I made the box and then cut the complete box in half so it fits perfectly when shut. As the grain matches and the box was finished as a 'solid' the top and bottom are virtually invisible and you can hardly feel the join either.

Hinges are turning out to be a pain to find. You can't have high quality, small size and low cost all in one. You can get cheap small hinges on Amazon by the ton but finding small high quality hinges isn't possible (yet).

The other discovery is that good sand paper is expensive but cheap sand paper isn't worth the effort of buying! :)

One coat of linseed oil
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/8845/pFj3rl.jpg)

Two coats of linseed oil
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/1306/dGjli2.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/9849/iwqa1N.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/2149/G24Htk.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 25, 2020, 03:15:09 PM
Nice! That has some nice figure in the grain. I have a plank of sapele that I have yet to do something with.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 25, 2020, 03:37:37 PM
Nice! That has some nice figure in the grain. I have a plank of sapele that I have yet to do something with.

It is a beautiful wood that rewards all the effort you put into it.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 25, 2020, 06:38:51 PM
do you use boiled or unboiled linseed oil?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 25, 2020, 07:39:45 PM
do you use boiled or unboiled linseed oil?

Unboiled. Have you used both?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 25, 2020, 08:45:33 PM
Sapelle, Meranti, Luan, and Ocumee are similar woods and all of then have open grain that is a bitch to fill.  They are attractive when nicely finished.

Keep up the good work Tank. You have done an admirable job of box making. ....And keep your fingers out of the saw blade, chisels, plane irons and such.

You are absolutely right about sandpaper. Cheap stuff is near worthless and premium quality sandpaper is scandalously expensive.  The Finns make some pretty decent sandpaper under the names Mirka and Bulldog.  Japanese sandpaper is good. It has names like Eagle Brand.  Probably the most expensive is 3M brand but it is consistently better than most.  Also the American brand, Norton, is very good quality.............and expensive of course.  Norton makes a foam sanding pad that is very durable, works exceptionally well on curved or rounded surfaces, and cost a princes ransom but worth the price.  It can be used wet or dry.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 25, 2020, 08:47:39 PM
3m and Norton are both brands I have tried that are very good.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 25, 2020, 09:18:23 PM

Never mind.   I am still struggling with the simple act of posting a picture.  Here is what I have done.....

[img]https://www.Imgur.com P1020822jpg[img]  What I have I failed to do or did I do the wrong thing?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 25, 2020, 09:20:55 PM
(https://www.Imgur.com P1020822jpg)

I have, once more, summoned the courage to attempt posting a picture.

For somebody as technically competent as you I have absolutely no idea how you manage not to be able to post a picture!!!! :rofl:

Where do you copy the link from?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 25, 2020, 09:26:35 PM
do you use boiled or unboiled linseed oil?

Unboiled. Have you used both?

no only boiled.

its a customary treatment for beehives because theyre always outside. boiled linseed oil won't cause the wood to swell. unboiled linseed oil used to be a bodge on restoring the wooden wheels of old automobiles. you soaked em in it and they swelled up tight again. stayed tight as long as you kept up with the treatment, like armor all.

the way the boled stuff is used is to have a metal trough built over a fire or a gas ring, and you heat the oil until its super hot. then float the wooden beehive parts in it. they soak up the material but for some reason don't swell up, and so you can assemble normally. used this way it isn't a surface finish, its a preservative, like copper naphanate, except less toxic. you buy it labelled boiled already.if you dont heat it up only a little soaks in.

this is one of thosethings beekeepers do outside because so many people set their warehouses on fire doig this and wax rendering.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 26, 2020, 12:09:28 AM
https://i.imgur.com/TatX691.jpg
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: No one on July 26, 2020, 02:18:45 AM
Anyone have a workshop, or fixit stuff to overhaul America's idiot in chief issues?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 26, 2020, 04:15:09 AM
Anyone have a workshop, or fixit stuff to overhaul America's idiot in chief issues?

That thing is totalled, and beyond repair. It should be hauled away and fed to the hogs, and then the hogs should be cremated. And the smoke captured and put in the deepest pit on the planet, which is apparently in that idiot's controller's country, Russia.  >:( Need one ask again what my feelings are?  :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: No one on July 26, 2020, 04:26:08 AM
So you're saying, there's a chance?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 26, 2020, 04:58:54 AM
I like the seamless look when the box is closed. I have only used raw linseed oil on wood.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 26, 2020, 06:53:04 AM
https://i.imgur.com/TatX691.jpg

Bingo! I can see that link.

When I put the [img][/img] Tags around it this is what you get.


(https://i.imgur.com/TatX691.jpg)

What is that? It looks like some sort of sharpening device?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 26, 2020, 06:57:15 AM
Ah! Now I see the knife!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 26, 2020, 08:37:46 AM
https://i.imgur.com/TatX691.jpg

Bingo! I can see that link.

When I put the [img][/img] Tags around it this is what you get.


(https://i.imgur.com/TatX691.jpg)

What is that? It looks like some sort of sharpening device?

It is easier to interpret if you rotate the photo 90° to the right.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 26, 2020, 04:42:43 PM
Started this at 9:15 and finished at 15:30 including an hour off for lunch :)


1. The block is the dimensions of the internal space I wanted in the box. Building the box around the block means you only have to do one set of accurate dimensions. From then on everything is built relative to the block.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/5988/eAS5mc.jpg)

2. The 6 faces of the box rough cut and surrounding the block
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/5402/JoevZh.jpg)

3. With the lid open
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/3824/uOO4rF.jpg)

4. Marked up so I can sand down the inside faces of the tiles that make up the box. Much easier to do this now then when the box is assembled.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/9747/Kt10S7.jpg)

5. Assembling parts of the box around the block.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/7840/Dbidoc.jpg)

6. Assembling the sub assemblies.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/3046/7a5Z53.jpg)

7. The completed carcase of the box with the front face sanded flat.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/7473/DBQkwj.jpg)

8. The back of the carcase where all the rough cutting tolerances accumulate. I cut the back flat with a single pass of a mitre saw.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/7781/L40xGQ.jpg)

9. Finished down to 600 grit on all faces. The box was made to hold the dice tiles.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/9844/LO8QJR.jpg)

10. Detail of the lid hinge. Two bits of brass rod.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/4153/TlBi0p.jpg)

11. Finished with linseed oil.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/4882/J8274v.jpg)

12. Finished with dice tiles inside.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/885/NYjulY.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 26, 2020, 09:44:58 PM
https://i.imgur.com/TatX691.jpg

Bingo! I can see that link.

When I put the [img][/img] Tags around it this is what you get.


(https://i.imgur.com/TatX691.jpg)

What is that? It looks like some sort of sharpening device?

It is easier to interpret if you rotate the photo 90° to the right.



On another thread I had said that I was buying a Heim Joint. Someone asked what that is. It can be seen at the left side of the pic, attached to an aluminum block which can be moved up or down the vertical post.

The purpose of the mechanism is to sharpen knives or other cutting tools. The dark colored item nearest the lower edge of the pic is merely a block of wood that can slide along the longer rod if desired.  The square section of the block has different grades of wet-or- dry sandpaper glued in place.  The height adjustment of the Heim Joint allows precise adjustment of the sharpening angle of the knife.  Most kitchen knives use 15 degree angle. Larger ones such a cleavers typically use 20 degrees.  Plane irons and chisels may have various angles.  It is difficult to maintain a perfectly straight angle when hand sharpening in the usual way. 

The gadget can sharpen edges with great precision.  Move the block sideways, or alternatively, along the long rod axis.  This tool can make knives scary sharp and do it easily with a high degree of accuracy.  The Heim Joint allows movement of the block in any direction while holding the selected angle of block to blade.  The thing is not only practical but fun to use, and easy to build.  There are several variations for building this tool on You Tube.  Most of them use only wooden parts to duplicate the differential pivot motion. 

There is a world of difference between slicing a tomato with a dull knife or a very sharp one.  Sharp tools are decidedly less likely to cause personal injury than dull ones.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 26, 2020, 10:11:53 PM
For sharpening my knives, I bought a kit by SmithsProducts. You can see the slots for different angles.

https://www.smithsproducts.com/standard-precision-sharpening-system (https://www.smithsproducts.com/standard-precision-sharpening-system)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on July 26, 2020, 10:26:13 PM
I can't use tung oil as it is derived from a nut. One of my grandsons has a nut allergy. So best not.

Ah, good thinking! You might try the Minwax "Tung Oil Finish" that is actually linseed oil based with some additives to make it behave more like tung oil. I've never used raw linseed oil because it can take a long time to cure. Commercial boiled linseed oil is not actually boiled any more. It has chemical additives to duplicate the change that boiling produces. A less toxic choice that also cures quickly is something like Parr's Danish Oil (http://parrsnaturalwoodfinishes.co.uk/danishoil.html), which is a polymerised linseed oil. Polymerisation is achieved by heating the oil in an oxygen-free vessel for several days--no chemical additives.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 27, 2020, 04:18:53 AM
Parr's might be like Watco's Danish oil finish. I didn't read through Recusant's link that far. I used Watco's Danish oil finish on this carving tool chest I built recently. I tried an oil-based wiping finish that gave excellent depth, but then had blebs in the finish that I just couldn't get rid of without sanding it all the way off...TWICE.  >:( I then tried spray spar urethane, which gave such a bad orange peel finish that I sanded that all the way down to bare wood, as well. I've previously had success with the spar urethane flowing out, but I suspect that California legislation has ruined yet another formula, I dunno. I ended up using Watco's Danish oil finish in a medium walnut color to finish this carving tool chest. It's made of black walnut, and the medium walnut color deepened the color without obscuring the grain. The only other treatment of the wood was a bunch of carnauba wax. It's all pretty much the same color, but the lighting makes it look like the top and sides are different. My camera skills are a bit lacking, to say the least.

(https://i.imgur.com/3GeORob.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 27, 2020, 04:36:39 AM
12. Finished with dice tiles inside.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/885/NYjulY.jpg)

It came out well. That hinge method is very satisfying, with the brass rod that, I assume, goes all the way through the lid from left to right.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 27, 2020, 07:12:36 AM
For sharpening my knives, I bought a kit by SmithsProducts. You can see the slots for different angles.

https://www.smithsproducts.com/standard-precision-sharpening-system (https://www.smithsproducts.com/standard-precision-sharpening-system)

Looks interesting.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 27, 2020, 07:14:00 AM
I can't use tung oil as it is derived from a nut. One of my grandsons has a nut allergy. So best not.

Ah, good thinking! You might try the Minwax "Tung Oil Finish" that is actually linseed oil based with some additives to make it behave more like tung oil. I've never used raw linseed oil because it can take a long time to cure. Commercial boiled linseed oil is not actually boiled any more. It has chemical additives to duplicate the change that boiling produces. A less toxic choice that also cures quickly is something like Parr's Danish Oil (http://parrsnaturalwoodfinishes.co.uk/danishoil.html), which is a polymerised linseed oil. Polymerisation is achieved by heating the oil in an oxygen-free vessel for several days--no chemical additives.

I shall investigate :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 27, 2020, 07:18:45 AM
Parr's might be like Watco's Danish oil finish. I didn't read through Recusant's link that far. I used Watco's Danish oil finish on this carving tool chest I built recently. I tried an oil-based wiping finish that gave excellent depth, but then had blebs in the finish that I just couldn't get rid of without sanding it all the way off...TWICE.  >:( I then tried spray spar urethane, which gave such a bad orange peel finish that I sanded that all the way down to bare wood, as well. I've previously had success with the spar urethane flowing out, but I suspect that California legislation has ruined yet another formula, I dunno. I ended up using Watco's Danish oil finish in a medium walnut color to finish this carving tool chest. It's made of black walnut, and the medium walnut color deepened the color without obscuring the grain. The only other treatment of the wood was a bunch of carnauba wax. It's all pretty much the same color, but the lighting makes it look like the top and sides are different. My camera skills are a bit lacking, to say the least.

(https://i.imgur.com/3GeORob.jpg)

A stunning bit of work. And I feel your pain with all that sanding!

If you still have the cabinet I'd appreciate some photos of the drawer structure if you have time.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 27, 2020, 07:27:06 AM
12. Finished with dice tiles inside.
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/885/NYjulY.jpg)

It came out well. That hinge method is very satisfying, with the brass rod that, I assume, goes all the way through the lid from left to right.

I don't have a drill press (yet) so there is no way I could drill a hole accurate all the way through from one side to the other, nor a drill bit of that length. So I held the lid in place with a clamp and drilled two 4mm holes 20mm deep, one on each side. The wood is 10mm thick. I cut two 15mm lengths of 4mm brass rod. Then I just tapped the rod into the holes. The rod remains stationary as 2/3 are embedded in the box carcase and 1/3 in the lid. It has the added bonus that the hinge is stiff and stays shut or open, wherever you put it. I can see a few more boxes made like this. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 27, 2020, 04:23:27 PM
Thanks, Tank! It was an adventure, for sure.

Here's a pic of one of the drawers. The sides have a dado for a strip of wood inside the carcass that they slide on rather than have metal slides. This is portable to take to carving class, so weight is a consideration. The sides and the front are rabbeted 1/8" deep by 1/4" wide for the bottom to fit up into them. The chisels are separated by poplar pegs in poplar strips. The sizes vary because I wanted the chisels to not knock into each other during transport. The blades are of course variable width, as are the handles. The smaller width chisels have smaller handles. It's all just butt joints. It doesn't weigh that much, so even a weak joint like that is plenty strong enough to hold it together.

(https://i.imgur.com/NyN5811.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 27, 2020, 06:22:27 PM
Thanks DL. They do look lovely :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 27, 2020, 08:07:06 PM
Thanks DL. They do look lovely :)

Thanks! :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on July 28, 2020, 01:38:51 AM
A spectacular work DL.  You are making the rest of us look pedestrian.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 28, 2020, 04:01:34 AM
A spectacular work DL.  You are making the rest of us look pedestrian.

I appreciate that compliment, Icarus, and I almost didn't post those pictures for the simple reason that I don't like "strangling a baby in the cradle". But that comes at a cost of having done wood working for literally 6 decades. I think that I cut my first board with a saw at age 6. I'll never knock another's work, because we are all just somewhere on the learning curve. If you go over to the https://www.lumberjocks.com/ (https://www.lumberjocks.com/) website, where I post under the same nick, you will see people's work that simply put me to shame. There are people there who make pill sorting trays from plywood, and they don't get laughed at, for that reason. I will say that for as little time as Tank has appeared to have been working wood, and given his equipment, he's doing extremely well.

On that note, there is no way that I would have the vision to make a painting like your "Opera". I am a mechanical draftsman in that regard, and learning wood carving is breaking me from it. When I worked as an engineer, the parts or the machine had to follow strict guidelines for dimensioning and tolerancing, if the parts were going to fit together and work. One of my early carvings was of a wood spirit (I like them, even though the idea of a spirit living in a tree is something that I find ludicrous). In the tutorial, I followed the steps exactly, but some pieces broke off, as they will, when carving wood. But I was looking at the cover of that book and at the tutorial, and the pictures were different! :lol: It was then that I realized that carving, as an artistic endeavor, is free of a lot of the strictures that the machinists and I were held to in a production environment.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 28, 2020, 05:18:42 AM
On that note, there is no way that I would have the vision to make a painting like your "Opera".

 :lol:  DL, I think you are confusing Icarus with me, which is understandable, since we both have wings — mine are on my feet and helmet, whereas Icarus has homemade ones of feathers and wax on his arms.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 28, 2020, 08:29:01 AM
A spectacular work DL.  You are making the rest of us look pedestrian.

I appreciate that compliment, Icarus, and I almost didn't post those pictures for the simple reason that I don't like "strangling a baby in the cradle". But that comes at a cost of having done wood working for literally 6 decades. I think that I cut my first board with a saw at age 6. I'll never knock another's work, because we are all just somewhere on the learning curve. If you go over to the https://www.lumberjocks.com/ (https://www.lumberjocks.com/) website, where I post under the same nick, you will see people's work that simply put me to shame. There are people there who make pill sorting trays from plywood, and they don't get laughed at, for that reason. I will say that for as little time as Tank has appeared to have been working wood, and given his equipment, he's doing extremely well.

On that note, there is no way that I would have the vision to make a painting like your "Opera". I am a mechanical draftsman in that regard, and learning wood carving is breaking me from it. When I worked as an engineer, the parts or the machine had to follow strict guidelines for dimensioning and tolerancing, if the parts were going to fit together and work. One of my early carvings was of a wood spirit (I like them, even though the idea of a spirit living in a tree is something that I find ludicrous). In the tutorial, I followed the steps exactly, but some pieces broke off, as they will, when carving wood. But I was looking at the cover of that book and at the tutorial, and the pictures were different! :lol: It was then that I realized that carving, as an artistic endeavor, is free of a lot of the strictures that the machinists and I were held to in a production environment.

You have 60 years of experience and talent to share. Don't you dare hide your light under a bushel. Your case is an little catalogue of tips and wrinkles and corrected mistakes. That's what I want to learn. My wood work is a hobby, yours is a profession but we both enjoy what we do and produce. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 28, 2020, 08:30:15 AM
On that note, there is no way that I would have the vision to make a painting like your "Opera".

 :lol:  DL, I think you are confusing Icarus with me, which is understandable, since we both have wings — mine are on my feet and helmet, whereas Icarus has homemade ones of feathers and wax on his arms.

Hmmmm? I think he means your painting.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 28, 2020, 12:13:20 PM
On that note, there is no way that I would have the vision to make a painting like your "Opera".

 :lol:  DL, I think you are confusing Icarus with me, which is understandable, since we both have wings — mine are on my feet and helmet, whereas Icarus has homemade ones of feathers and wax on his arms.

Hmmmm? I think he means your painting.

Perhaps I'm confused — I though he was addressing Icarus!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on July 28, 2020, 02:10:25 PM
On that note, there is no way that I would have the vision to make a painting like your "Opera".

 :lol:  DL, I think you are confusing Icarus with me, which is understandable, since we both have wings — mine are on my feet and helmet, whereas Icarus has homemade ones of feathers and wax on his arms.

 :-[ Sorry, I woke up at 3:30 yesterday to pee and couldn't go back to sleep. I claim industrial-grade fatigue.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on July 28, 2020, 02:30:32 PM
On that note, there is no way that I would have the vision to make a painting like your "Opera".

 :lol:  DL, I think you are confusing Icarus with me, which is understandable, since we both have wings — mine are on my feet and helmet, whereas Icarus has homemade ones of feathers and wax on his arms.

 :-[ Sorry, I woke up at 3:30 yesterday to pee and couldn't go back to sleep. I claim industrial-grade fatigue.

 :thumbsup2:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on July 28, 2020, 05:19:38 PM
jeez you people show me up as a peasant

my abilities at woodworking are rudimentary, table saw and air staplers mostly does it for me.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on July 28, 2020, 05:24:58 PM
jeez you people show me up as a peasant

my abilities at woodworking are rudimentary, table saw and air staplers mostly does it for me.

But I think you're the only record holder on here :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 04, 2020, 08:43:09 PM
Made a mount for my belt sander, clamped down while in use. :)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3562/FVYAAQ.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on August 04, 2020, 09:45:13 PM
Nice! Is that 40 grit paper on there?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 05, 2020, 03:56:26 AM
That will be useful, Tank. Don't you find the days are too short after retirement?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on August 05, 2020, 04:23:57 AM
I've gotten to be quite the slacker finally, mostly because the arthritis in my feet cuts into my work day. I talked to my family doctor yesterday and it appears that elective surgery may be back in operation (so to speak) and I may be able to get my left foot worked on again, hopefully with better effect. I am working on putting white PVC lattice on top of the pergola in our back yard. It makes interesting grid patterns on the wood. I'll take a picture tomorrow, aimed towards the sky. I can take about an hour on my feet and then have to take a break. My butt is starting to hurt from all the sitting. Can't sit or stand for extended periods. :( I guess it's time to go lie down and go to sleep.  ;D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 05, 2020, 05:25:20 AM
I've gotten to be quite the slacker finally, mostly because the arthritis in my feet cuts into my work day. I talked to my family doctor yesterday and it appears that elective surgery may be back in operation (so to speak) and I may be able to get my left foot worked on again, hopefully with better effect. I am working on putting white PVC lattice on top of the pergola in our back yard. It makes interesting grid patterns on the wood. I'll take a picture tomorrow, aimed towards the sky. I can take about an hour on my feet and then have to take a break. My butt is starting to hurt from all the sitting. Can't sit or stand for extended periods. :( I guess it's time to go lie down and go to sleep.  ;D

I can just imagine how frustrating your situation is, because I suffered similarly with my left hip before I had the successful replacement.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 05, 2020, 08:32:40 AM
Nice! Is that 40 grit paper on there?

Yes that is 40grit. I also have 80 and 120.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 05, 2020, 08:33:30 AM
That will be useful, Tank. Don't you find the days are too short after retirement?

Yes! It's daft that I don't have enough hours in the day to do nothing!   ;D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 05, 2020, 08:35:32 AM
I've gotten to be quite the slacker finally, mostly because the arthritis in my feet cuts into my work day. I talked to my family doctor yesterday and it appears that elective surgery may be back in operation (so to speak) and I may be able to get my left foot worked on again, hopefully with better effect. I am working on putting white PVC lattice on top of the pergola in our back yard. It makes interesting grid patterns on the wood. I'll take a picture tomorrow, aimed towards the sky. I can take about an hour on my feet and then have to take a break. My butt is starting to hurt from all the sitting. Can't sit or stand for extended periods. :( I guess it's time to go lie down and go to sleep.  ;D

You'll have to buy a blow up bed to take with you to lay down on whenever you need to :grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on August 05, 2020, 11:55:38 AM
That will be useful, Tank. Don't you find the days are too short after retirement?

Yes! It's daft that I don't have enough hours in the day to do nothing!   ;D

Well, you probably deserve a good rest much more than I do. I must be honest and say I was never the hardest-working person.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 05, 2020, 12:31:14 PM
That will be useful, Tank. Don't you find the days are too short after retirement?

Yes! It's daft that I don't have enough hours in the day to do nothing!   ;D

Well, you probably deserve a good rest much more than I do. I must be honest and say I was never the hardest-working person.

Well neither was I :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on August 05, 2020, 01:57:43 PM
I've gotten to be quite the slacker finally, mostly because the arthritis in my feet cuts into my work day. I talked to my family doctor yesterday and it appears that elective surgery may be back in operation (so to speak) and I may be able to get my left foot worked on again, hopefully with better effect. I am working on putting white PVC lattice on top of the pergola in our back yard. It makes interesting grid patterns on the wood. I'll take a picture tomorrow, aimed towards the sky. I can take about an hour on my feet and then have to take a break. My butt is starting to hurt from all the sitting. Can't sit or stand for extended periods. :( I guess it's time to go lie down and go to sleep.  ;D

You'll have to buy a blow up bed to take with you to lay down on whenever you need to :grin:

 :D With an inflatable girl friend? I'm in!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 21, 2020, 03:18:13 PM
My latest useful gadget.

It's a sanding sheet holder. The central piece is 21 x 30 cm and 3/4" thick plywood. The holding rails are 2 x 30 cm from the same plywood. The base is sized to fit the clamps and ended up 41 x 34 cm of 1/2" plywood. This holds a single sheet of abrasive perfectly flat. My previous attempt held the paper by the short edges but this caused a problem. If the abrasive was flat it was fine. But if the abrasive curled it did so along the long axis. This meant it didn't lay flat. This meant that the edges of the piece of wood were slightly rounded.

I find it a very useful piece of kit.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/2693/108iji.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Recusant on August 22, 2020, 12:40:51 AM
Add a piece of glass or acrylic, and in combination with a honing guide you've got a sharpening station there as well. With good quality sandpaper of the proper grit, you'll get satisfactory results, I think.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on August 22, 2020, 05:39:11 AM
Tank a useful alternative to laying an abrasive sheet flat is "spraymount".  That is a contact adhesive in a spray can, primarily intended for photo mounts or other mounts that are easily removable.  3M is one of the brands that you can find in a photo supply shop.   This method assures that the abrasive is uniformly  as flat as the surface that you  have mounted on.  In fact there are situations when you want a curved surface for your abrasive, or a tiny patch of abrasive....and so on.
 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 22, 2020, 08:29:08 AM
Tank a useful alternative to laying an abrasive sheet flat is "spraymount".  That is a contact adhesive in a spray can, primarily intended for photo mounts or other mounts that are easily removable.  3M is one of the brands that you can find in a photo supply shop.   This method assures that the abrasive is uniformly  as flat as the surface that you  have mounted on.  In fact there are situations when you want a curved surface for your abrasive, or a tiny patch of abrasive....and so on.

Many years ago I used to have to manually paginate a catalogue. This consisted of cutting up rolls of copy and using spray mount to stick it to templates. We used gallons of it! LOL

I'm on a wood working page on Facebook and a chap there does exactly what you suggested :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on August 22, 2020, 08:32:37 AM
Add a piece of glass or acrylic, and in combination with a honing guide you've got a sharpening station there as well. With good quality sandpaper of the proper grit, you'll get satisfactory results, I think.

I have some glass that I might be able to use. Have you seen the price of acrylic recently? With all the protective shields being built its just insanely expensive. I still have the previous version and by circumstance it has a formica/melamine surface so I'll have a go at repurposing that. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on August 23, 2020, 08:21:36 PM
Not to put too fine a point on it, but ordinary glass is not really flat.  There are degrees of flatness of course and glass plate is entirely adequate for wood working uses.

When I was in the manufacturing business we made measuring instruments.  Our tension measuring instruments needed a flat surface to "zero set" the tool.  We learned that glass is not flat in an incident with one of our Brit buyers.  He communicated with me to reveal that his tension meters could not be reliably zero set.   OH SHIT!!!!  Was there something wrong with all ten meters that he had just bought? It turned out that the glass plates furnished with the meters was all wavy.  The human eye could not detect that waviness but the meter could easily do so.    We sent the customer some new test plates made of granite tile sections whose flatness had been verified.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on August 23, 2020, 10:33:29 PM
Indeed. We used granite surface plates to assemble Flight hardware (goes into space) because the mounting surface has to be dead flat when mounted to the equipment panel. Any kind of stress on a component has to be carefully taken out, because they'll get broken with all the stress and vibration from the launch. Harnesses and cables have to be mounted so that the connectors are all neutral to loading as well, and have enough spots tied down that they won't whip.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 01, 2020, 05:16:10 PM
Well the chess set is finished. A box for the chessmen. The floating shelf in the box is the same dimensions as the bottom so the front panel closes against it. Brass rod hinges at the front and conventional hinges at the back. The chessmen are made from oak and sapele as is the board and box. Finished with linseed oil.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/7783/zeDRLU.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/1379/sdVdwn.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/640/ZLkqbK.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/9676/UJ85yv.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/8554/Q3a81V.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 01, 2020, 06:03:24 PM
That's really cool, Tank! I especially like the chess pieces ;D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Randy on September 01, 2020, 07:09:46 PM
I like the chessboard and the pieces. Excellent job!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 01, 2020, 09:02:30 PM
Nice, minimalist design!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 01, 2020, 09:08:16 PM
Nice, minimalist design!

Well I don't have a lathe so it had to be square. I found the design on Youtube.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 02, 2020, 04:28:55 AM
That falls into the heirloom category. You should engrave the date of completion and your name on the bottom of the board.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on September 02, 2020, 05:03:27 AM
Nice work tank.  I appreciate your craftsmanship.  The chess pieces are particularly imaginative and well done.

Do as Hermes suggests.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 02, 2020, 07:33:36 AM
That falls into the heirloom category. You should engrave the date of completion and your name on the bottom of the board.

That's a good idea. I bought a wood burner stencil and iron and I haven't used it yet.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 02, 2020, 07:34:06 AM
Nice work tank.  I appreciate your craftsmanship.  The chess pieces are particularly imaginative and well done.

Do as Hermes suggests.

Yes dad.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on September 02, 2020, 12:10:57 PM
it is really nice

how doesthe stencil work?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 02, 2020, 12:59:26 PM
it is really nice

how doesthe stencil work?

Essentially a guided electric soldering iron.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 06, 2020, 02:14:08 PM
I found the 60° setting on my mitre saw :)

3 main parts before assembly
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/8088/ASqNhJ.jpg)

All assembled and sanded to 120g
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/82/1j5zjf.jpg)

Cut into two pieces and adding the hinges
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/8980/aOAXeC.jpg)

No linseed oil but with the three trial pieces I made
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3523/8Zg0ke.jpg)

Partially finished so you can see the difference the linseed oil makes
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/1773/wz6MdA.jpg)

Inside
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/7428/gUuyJI.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/1464/b21GGp.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/8461/REkzUy.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 06, 2020, 03:07:51 PM
Nice! Oak and sapele?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 06, 2020, 03:36:26 PM
The edge-on view of the plywood layers in the plywood hexagon in photo 4 is very attractive.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 06, 2020, 03:47:43 PM
Nice! Oak and sapele?

Yep! :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 06, 2020, 03:49:03 PM
The edge-on view of the plywood layers in the plywood hexagon in photo 4 is very attractive.

I thought so too. That's what started me off on the triangles/hexagons.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 06, 2020, 07:13:33 PM
Are you going to keep your stash of benzene in the box?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 06, 2020, 07:17:43 PM
Are you going to keep your stash of benzene in the box?

 :snicker1: it could be a ring box.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 06, 2020, 07:30:25 PM
The edge-on view of the plywood layers in the plywood hexagon in photo 4 is very attractive.

Indeed. I'm betting on Baltic birch. I use a lot of it for casework because it doesn't turn into a tortilla shape after cutting, like most other type of plywood. It looks like that (light/dark stripes) when finished with a clear coat.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 06, 2020, 08:40:03 PM
The edge-on view of the plywood layers in the plywood hexagon in photo 4 is very attractive.

Indeed. I'm betting on Baltic birch. I use a lot of it for casework because it doesn't turn into a tortilla shape after cutting, like most other type of plywood. It looks like that (light/dark stripes) when finished with a clear coat.

It looks like birch but it was an 8" off cut that I was playing with. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 07, 2020, 04:39:53 AM
Are you going to keep your stash of benzene in the box?

 :snicker1: it could be a ring box.

Pity you didn't use cedar wood. Then it would have been an aromatic ring box.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on September 07, 2020, 05:11:25 AM
There are several kinds of cedar.  Some of it is used for roofing shingles and others of the species are used for various projects such as canoe building. These cedars have little or no prominent smell. The one that you are referring to is commonly called Incense Cedar.  It is the only one of the cedar types that has the unique essence. 

Hermes, I suspect that you know what the chemical component is that causes the pleasing odor and why it also repels insects.  It is said that certain of the cedars contain a toxic chemical that makes sawing or sanding of the wood somewhat dangerous.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 07, 2020, 05:25:44 AM
Are you going to keep your stash of benzene in the box?

 :snicker1: it could be a ring box.

Pity you didn't use cedar wood. Then it would have been an aromatic ring box.

 :jaded rimshot: Couldn't find the other one, I'm too tired. :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 07, 2020, 08:05:17 AM
Are you going to keep your stash of benzene in the box?

 :snicker1: it could be a ring box.

Pity you didn't use cedar wood. Then it would have been an aromatic ring box.

:grin:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 07, 2020, 05:53:34 PM
This looks promising.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 07, 2020, 07:50:40 PM
EDM is not new. I've designed and had parts made via a wire EDM process back in the '90s, and it was used by others before that. In our case they were thin structures for antennas that would not lend themselves to standard machining techniques.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 07, 2020, 07:51:43 PM
It's a spark eroder. I first saw one of these in 1977 when I started work. They were being used to make tiny plastic moulds for IC sockets.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 08, 2020, 01:40:11 PM
Are you going to keep your stash of benzene in the box?

 :snicker1: it could be a ring box.

Pity you didn't use cedar wood. Then it would have been an aromatic ring box.

:lol: And all the nightmares from trying to draw tiny hexagons in Organic chem class are coming back to me now!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 08, 2020, 01:41:48 PM
Tank, have you tried making a Russian box? :grin: Boxes within boxes...like Inception, but with boxes. :deadpan:

:P
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 08, 2020, 05:58:20 PM
Tank, have you tried making a Russian box? :grin: Boxes within boxes...like Inception, but with boxes. :deadpan:

:P

Not tried that yet. But might do one day :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 16, 2020, 04:54:14 AM
I love the profile of this hammer designed by Keiji Takeuchi. I think I need one in my toolbox, or displayed as a sculpture in my home.

(https://i.imgur.com/TJcHtHf.jpg)

(https://i.imgur.com/4IpLnAP.jpg)

http://www.keijitakeuchi.com/index.html
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: jumbojak on September 16, 2020, 12:29:25 PM
It looks rather slippery. Could be right up your alley.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 16, 2020, 01:44:33 PM
It looks rather slippery. Could be right up your alley.

 :snicker1: You know me so well.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 16, 2020, 04:17:55 PM
That's s sweet hammer! I'm not sure that I'd use it on metal, though. Being one piece of metal, it would likely ring enough to sting the hands. Wall art, I guess. :shrug:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 17, 2020, 04:15:58 PM
An experiment in feet, hinges and brass.

Simple but quite solid as the lid and box walls needed to accommodate barrel hinges. The lid it made of two pieces of oak  with particularly nice grain. The feet are also oar and routed, the body is Sapele. The brass pins are brazing rod, which is by far the cheapest way to buy brass rod. I don't think I'll be using barrel hinges again before I get a drill press.


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/6922/RRMmWS.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/1791/acfXhg.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/4347/8SB9I2.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/6461/mUezdd.jpg)

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 19, 2020, 01:31:00 PM
Finished another little hexagonal jewellery box. This is made from Sapele with brass highlights.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3323/nyZDRO.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/7151/dsK0tc.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/4471/pLwUlK.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/9546/5xcNkS.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Randy on September 19, 2020, 02:25:40 PM
My caregiver saw the boxes and loves them. :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 19, 2020, 03:33:44 PM
My caregiver saw the boxes and loves them. :)

 :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on September 19, 2020, 03:56:08 PM
do you sell any of this stuff?

if you dont you should
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 19, 2020, 06:47:56 PM
do you sell any of this stuff?

if you dont you should

You're the second person to ask me that today :)

They're more hobby pieces. But I may run out of room and start selling them then.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 19, 2020, 08:59:19 PM
Nice work, Tank! You're on a real tear with this woodworking!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Magdalena on September 19, 2020, 09:49:49 PM
Finished another little hexagonal jewellery box. This is made from Sapele with brass highlights.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3323/nyZDRO.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/7151/dsK0tc.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/4471/pLwUlK.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/9546/5xcNkS.jpg)

Very nice boxes and orchids.  :tellmemore:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on September 20, 2020, 04:29:35 AM
The brass inlays are well done and they are becoming a marker of your style. It would be interesting to do similar inserts with glass rods or some of the stones you use in your jewellery.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 20, 2020, 07:56:51 AM
Nice work, Tank! You're on a real tear with this woodworking!

I find it totally absorbing. When I'm doing it there is just one point of focus everything else just disappears. :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 20, 2020, 07:59:07 AM
The brass inlays are well done and they are becoming a marker of your style. It would be interesting to do similar inserts with glass rods or some of the stones you use in your jewellery.

I have been thinking about haematite beads :)

And the router tip you gave me a while ago gets used regularly.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on September 20, 2020, 08:00:33 AM
Finished another little hexagonal jewellery box. This is made from Sapele with brass highlights.
...

Very nice boxes and orchids.  :tellmemore:

The orchid was a present to my wife from one of her friends last year. I just keep watering it and it keeps flowering. Seems like a good deal to me :D
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on September 22, 2020, 05:31:50 PM
The brass inlays are well done and they are becoming a marker of your style. It would be interesting to do similar inserts with glass rods or some of the stones you use in your jewellery.

glass rods

(https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1296/8821/files/History_-_Milleforio_Venetian_Trade_Beads_1_269de262-b83c-4ff8-a065-53a639cc4668_medium.jpg?5365164706999618657)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on October 03, 2020, 11:48:21 AM
The last of the 3 hexagon boxes. This is made from oak :)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/5584/hsPpQo.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/5450/10tvBw.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/5720/wJuKdu.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/445/qLzmhk.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/7947/tmuJE8.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on October 03, 2020, 01:32:31 PM
Nice! Is that a magnet catch on the new one?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on October 03, 2020, 01:48:16 PM
Nice! Is that a magnet catch on the new one?

Yes. it's a pair of 6mm dia x 3mm Neodymium magnets. They are remarkably strong for their size.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 14, 2020, 02:09:01 PM
Tank, I thought of your work when I saw this video.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 14, 2020, 06:44:35 PM
That was interesting. I'd love that saw. It's so quiet.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 20, 2020, 09:04:01 AM
Dead simple but effective candle holder. 8" x 3" x 1" piece of wood, 1 hole for hinge, length of dowel as hinge pin, washers to separate pieces, 6 holes for candles and 10 cuts on the band saw. Plus sanding and finish to suit.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/9500/Q6RYo8.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/6207/Y6gNkX.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/354/AG7PO0.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 20, 2020, 10:25:52 AM
That looks so professional, Tank. Did you design it?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 20, 2020, 11:57:45 AM
That looks so professional, Tank. Did you design it?

No. I got a book of weekend woodwork projects and that was in it :)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 20, 2020, 12:33:39 PM
That looks so professional, Tank. Did you design it?

No. I got a book of weekend woodwork projects and that was in it :)

I thought it was the latest product of your workshop skills!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 20, 2020, 03:32:57 PM
That looks so professional, Tank. Did you design it?

No. I got a book of weekend woodwork projects and that was in it :)

I thought it was the latest product of your workshop skills!

Well I do have two new toys that facilitated their production :)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/2369/OecxuY.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 20, 2020, 03:42:17 PM
Sorry, I misunderstood: so you actually did make the candle holder, but it wasn't your own design. I am so slow sometimes (or usually, you must be thinking). Very nice new toys.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 20, 2020, 06:51:16 PM
Another little project. A candle nook. It has a space for a box of matches. Can I find a box of matches to fit it? Can I f**k! Apparently all matches are long to light BBQs now and smokers use lighters.

 :geezer!:

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/4553/01q7C3.jpg)

I had an old vacuum cleaner. I bought a 30L polypropylene barrel and a cyclone unit. 99% of the dust and shavings go into the barrel and the tiny fraction left gets filtered out. Cost about a third of what an assembled dust extraction unit would have. Works very well.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img924/2615/3TYhlY.jpg)
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: billy rubin on November 20, 2020, 09:02:05 PM
the duct tape adds a professional touch.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 20, 2020, 09:35:59 PM
the duct tape adds a professional touch.

Of course it adds an air of practical engineering skill :rofl:
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on November 21, 2020, 12:39:03 AM
Another little project. A candle nook. It has a space for a box of matches. Can I find a box of matches to fit it? Can I f**k! Apparently all matches are long to light BBQs now and smokers use lighters.

 :geezer!:

Really?

These don't seem too long,

https://www.amazon.co.uk/BOXS-SAFETY-MATCHES-BRAND-Boxes/dp/B0797TWSF3/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Safety+Matches&qid=1605918649&sr=8-1 (https://www.amazon.co.uk/BOXS-SAFETY-MATCHES-BRAND-Boxes/dp/B0797TWSF3/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Safety+Matches&qid=1605918649&sr=8-1)

and they've got a pic of a ship on them.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41rAWrMKgoL._AC_.jpg)

Is this merely a disingenuous attempt to justify the purchase of a Burleigh & Stronginthearm match shortening saw?

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 21, 2020, 03:23:46 AM
...
Is this merely a disingenuous attempt to justify the purchase of a Burleigh & Stronginthearm match shortening saw?

It sounds like a good enough reason to me. The name Burleigh & Stronginthearm makes me want to buy one as well.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 21, 2020, 07:51:10 AM
Another little project. A candle nook. It has a space for a box of matches. Can I find a box of matches to fit it? Can I f**k! Apparently all matches are long to light BBQs now and smokers use lighters.

 :geezer!:

Really?

These don't seem too long,

https://www.amazon.co.uk/BOXS-SAFETY-MATCHES-BRAND-Boxes/dp/B0797TWSF3/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Safety+Matches&qid=1605918649&sr=8-1 (https://www.amazon.co.uk/BOXS-SAFETY-MATCHES-BRAND-Boxes/dp/B0797TWSF3/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=Safety+Matches&qid=1605918649&sr=8-1)

and they've got a pic of a ship on them.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41rAWrMKgoL._AC_.jpg)

Is this merely a disingenuous attempt to justify the purchase of a Burleigh & Stronginthearm match shortening saw?

I'm trying to stop spending with Amazon! And I already have a Burleigh & Stronginthearm match shortening saw! It does have other uses :)

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 21, 2020, 07:52:40 AM
...
Is this merely a disingenuous attempt to justify the purchase of a Burleigh & Stronginthearm match shortening saw?

It sounds like a good enough reason to me. The name Burleigh & Stronginthearm makes me want to buy one as well.

That's Discworld marketing (https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Burleigh_%26_Stronginthearm) for you.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 21, 2020, 10:37:01 AM
...
Is this merely a disingenuous attempt to justify the purchase of a Burleigh & Stronginthearm match shortening saw?

It sounds like a good enough reason to me. The name Burleigh & Stronginthearm makes me want to buy one as well.

That's Discworld marketing (https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Burleigh_%26_Stronginthearm) for you.

Never read any of it, so thanks for the enlightenment.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 21, 2020, 11:24:13 AM
...
Is this merely a disingenuous attempt to justify the purchase of a Burleigh & Stronginthearm match shortening saw?

It sounds like a good enough reason to me. The name Burleigh & Stronginthearm makes me want to buy one as well.

That's Discworld marketing (https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Burleigh_%26_Stronginthearm) for you.

Never read any of it, so thanks for the enlightenment.

If you're inclined to dip your toe in I suspect you may like Small Gods (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Gods).
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: hermes2015 on November 21, 2020, 11:31:36 AM
...
Is this merely a disingenuous attempt to justify the purchase of a Burleigh & Stronginthearm match shortening saw?

It sounds like a good enough reason to me. The name Burleigh & Stronginthearm makes me want to buy one as well.

That's Discworld marketing (https://wiki.lspace.org/mediawiki/Burleigh_%26_Stronginthearm) for you.

Never read any of it, so thanks for the enlightenment.

If you're inclined to dip your toe in I suspect you may like Small Gods (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small_Gods).

Thanks, Tank.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on November 21, 2020, 04:18:54 PM
Catching up, here. Nice work, Tank, and my dust collector has duct tape on it too! When I bought a new shop vac it came with a 1-3/4" hose instead of 2" like the old one. Bedamned if I was going to take it back, though. I like the Burleigh&Stronginthearm reference. I re-read "Snuff" the other day.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on November 21, 2020, 11:17:03 PM
Dust collectors need a grounding circuit to conduct static electricity to ground.  Very fine dust particles can ignite when given the slightest spark.  Sure enough, table saw, band saw, and sanders make micro fine particles along with normal sized chips.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 22, 2020, 07:53:26 AM
Dust collectors need a grounding circuit to conduct static electricity to ground.  Very fine dust particles can ignite when given the slightest spark.  Sure enough, table saw, band saw, and sanders make micro fine particles along with normal sized chips.

I shall have a look at that point!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on November 23, 2020, 01:15:44 AM
Tank, the largest risk is when there is a larger longer length of pipes or hoses before entering the Cyclone. Such as the large shop that has long lengths of ducts that lead to the disposal unit.  Nonetheless there is a small but real risk even with the short length of tubing that enters your cyclone unit.

There are numerous You Tube videos that address the subject.

I confess that my garage, where my power tools live, are at some risk even if the risk is rather small.  I would be more than disappointed if I had some sort of spontaneous fire that destroyed my garage and the other parts of my living space. 

Suggestion: Use plastic bags to dispose of your saw dust collection of  course and fines to take kindness on your refuse collector people.

Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 23, 2020, 07:42:35 AM
Tank, the largest risk is when there is a larger longer length of pipes or hoses before entering the Cyclone. Such as the large shop that has long lengths of ducts that lead to the disposal unit.  Nonetheless there is a small but real risk even with the short length of tubing that enters your cyclone unit.

There are numerous You Tube videos that address the subject.

I confess that my garage, where my power tools live, are at some risk even if the risk is rather small.  I would be more than disappointed if I had some sort of spontaneous fire that destroyed my garage and the other parts of my living space. 

Suggestion: Use plastic bags to dispose of your saw dust collection of  course and fines to take kindness on your refuse collector people.

Good point about the dust in bags!
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 23, 2020, 11:14:24 PM
Dead simple but effective candle holder. 8" x 3" x 1" piece of wood, 1 hole for hinge, length of dowel as hinge pin, washers to separate pieces, 6 holes for candles and 10 cuts on the band saw. Plus sanding and finish to suit.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/9500/Q6RYo8.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/6207/Y6gNkX.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/354/AG7PO0.jpg)

Cool! 8)  Is it more complex than making a box?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Dark Lightning on November 24, 2020, 12:24:29 AM
Tank, the largest risk is when there is a larger longer length of pipes or hoses before entering the Cyclone. Such as the large shop that has long lengths of ducts that lead to the disposal unit.  Nonetheless there is a small but real risk even with the short length of tubing that enters your cyclone unit.

There are numerous You Tube videos that address the subject.

I confess that my garage, where my power tools live, are at some risk even if the risk is rather small.  I would be more than disappointed if I had some sort of spontaneous fire that destroyed my garage and the other parts of my living space. 

Suggestion: Use plastic bags to dispose of your saw dust collection of  course and fines to take kindness on your refuse collector people.

:lol: One of my neighbors worked as a trash collector for a time right out of high school. The incinerator crew wanted to make sure that he told them when he had a load from one of the carpenters in town, because they liked the fireball generated when they added the shavings and sawdust to the incinerator. In those days it was 35(?) gallon galvanized steel cans loaded into a hopper, so they were aware of what they were collecting.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Icarus on November 24, 2020, 01:43:52 AM
Having lived long enough to do some really dumb stuff, I have tales to tell.

I had a shallow tray of acetone that I was using to clean some tools.  I had been using epoxy or polyester or something.  It was nearing dusk and I thought to turn on the shop lights.  I had a solvent soaked rag in my hand when I flipped the light switch.  The rag burst into flames instantly. I hastily threw the burning rag over my head. Where would the burning rag land?  In the tray of acetone of course.  I managed to control the situation with my fire extinguisher in a big hurry.  No harm done except for some skid marks in my underpants.

The lights in the shop were fluorescent type.  Those lights have a ballast or transformer that makes the circuit induction reactive.  That is to say that the transformer  will kick back an instantaneous current when first energized.  Electric motors will do the same thing.  The bottom line is that the switch can cause a spark.  The lesson, if any, is: DO not have solvent rags in your hand when you flip the switch.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 24, 2020, 07:05:26 AM
Dead simple but effective candle holder. 8" x 3" x 1" piece of wood, 1 hole for hinge, length of dowel as hinge pin, washers to separate pieces, 6 holes for candles and 10 cuts on the band saw. Plus sanding and finish to suit.

...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img922/354/AG7PO0.jpg)

Cool! 8)  Is it more complex than making a box?

Not really. There are no joints as such. It would be virtually impossible without the pillar drill as it requires accurate holes for the candles and the hinge pin. It takes about an 1 1/2 hours from the blank.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on November 24, 2020, 01:19:09 PM
(https://i.imgur.com/2iZ7ajN.jpg)

So, your Duplo/lego stuff is pricey.
We bought a lot it mostly duplo.

Duplo
I built two trains, one went to a nephew.
Two ships
A helicopter
An aeroplane
A castle

I liked the ships, they had carpet stuck on the bottom so they could traverse the hardwood floor sea.
The bigger ship had a drop down bit at the back so you could drive your duplo vehicle in.
It had a sticky out bit like modern ships do, with a small boat hanging on by string,  you could lower it, there was a magnet involved. It had had an anchor at the front, string and twisted insulated copper wire, anchor shaped.  You could land the helicopter on the back deck at need. Part of the front deck could be lifted off to access the lower deck. You could add an official duplo block and then add lego to that.  She sails no more.  I've still got the castle, we never really used it that much. 
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 24, 2020, 04:53:40 PM
Is the picture part of the damage to your place that happened during the fire?
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Bad Penny II on November 25, 2020, 10:18:36 AM
Is the picture part of the damage to your place that happened during the fire?

Ye.
Title: Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
Post by: Tank on November 25, 2020, 10:49:19 AM
Is the picture part of the damage to your place that happened during the fire?

Ye.

Rather poignant.  :-\