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Getting To Know You => Laid Back Lounge => Topic started by: Recusant on November 08, 2015, 08:20:40 AM

Title: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on November 08, 2015, 08:20:40 AM
The original thread appears to be missing at the moment.

snollygoster (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/snollygoster) noun \ˈsnälēˌgästə(r)\ (etymology uncertain, though The Word Detective (http://www.word-detective.com/011107A.html) has a possible derivation from German: schnelle fast + geister spirits-- snallygaster, a mythical monster said, among residents of Maryland, to attack and eat livestock as well as the occasional child)

: a clever, unscrupulous person, most especially a politician

Quote...Truman sent reporters scurrying for their dictionaries when he denounced Republican "snollygosters." He turned to the puzzled press corps, chewing their pencils at trainside, and quipped, "Better look that word up, it's a good one." Later in the speech he suggested, "I wish some of these snollygosters would read the New Testament and perform accordingly." Short explained that the word meant "a pretentious, swaggering, prattling fellow."

-- Ken Hechler, Working with Truman: A Personal Memoir of the White House Years (1982)

QuoteA snollygoster is a fellow who wants office, regardless of party, platform or principles, and who, whenever he wins, gets there by the sheer force of monumental talknophical assumnacy.

-- Editor, Columbus Dispatch (1895)

I came up with my own definitions for those last two words, since I was unable to find them defined elsewhere.

talknophical adjective 1. Slick and devious use of rhetoric. 2. Deliberate obscurantism using grand philosophical (or pseudo-philosphical) terms and/or concepts intended to overwhelm the listener and leave them thinking that the speaker knows what he's talking about.

assumnacy noun (assume + lunacy) The propagation of lunatic ideas as if they are commonplace and unquestionable.


(https://i.imgur.com/7JXKADp.png)
Snollygoster
by Galago Agouti-Rex


Edited to revive image link. - R
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on November 09, 2015, 05:01:29 PM
I know that "snollygoster" was in the missing thread; I wanted a sort of bridge to this new version.

cozen (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cozen) verb \ˈkə-zən\ (Of uncertain origin (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=cozen); perhaps from French cousiner "cheat on pretext of being a cousin;" or from Middle English cosyn "fraud, trickery" [mid-15c.], which is perhaps related to Old French coçon "dealer, merchant, trader," from Latin cocionem "horse dealer." Webster's says perhaps from obsolete Italian cozzonare, from Italian cozzone horse trader, from Latin cocion-, cocio trader. The Oxford English Dictionary, on the other hand, says the earliest trace of the word appears to be in the derivative cousoner in J. Awdelay's Fraternitye of Vacabondes, 1561; it is not improbable that it arose among the vagabond class. It has generally been associated with cousin n., and compared with French cousiner , explained by Cotgrave, 1611, as 'to clayme kindred for aduantage, or particular ends; as he, who to saue charges in trauelling, goes from house to house, as cosin to the owner of euerie one', by Littré as 'faire le parasite sous prétexte de cousinage'.)

1 :  to deceive, win over, or induce to do something by artful coaxing and wheedling or shrewd trickery

2 :  to gain by cozening someone

coz·en·er noun

Below is a comparison of two prominent Royalists active in the English Civil Wars, by somebody who was a participant himself (http://www.britannica.com/biography/Edward-Hyde-1st-Earl-of-Clarendon).

QuoteGoring (http://bcw-project.org/biography/george-lord-goring), who was now general of the horse, was no more gracious to prince Rupert (http://www.britannica.com/biography/Prince-Rupert-English-commander), than Wilmot (http://bcw-project.org/biography/henry-lord-wilmot) had been; and had all the other's faults, and wanted his regularity, and preserving his respect with the officers. Wilmot loved debauchery, but shut it out from his business; never neglected that, and rarely miscarried in it. Goring had a much better understanding, and a sharper wit, (except in the very exercise of debauchery, and then the other was inspired,) a much keener courage, and presentness of mind in danger: Wilmot discerned it farther off, and because he could not behave himself so well in it, commonly prevented, or warily declined it; and never drank when he was within distance of an enemy: Goring was not able to resist the temptation, when he was in the middle of them, nor would decline it to obtain a victory; and in one of those fits, he had suffered the horse to escape out of Cornwall; and the most signal misfortunes of his life in war had their rise from that uncontrollable license. Neither of them valued their promises, professions, or friendships, according to any rules of honour or integrity; but Wilmot violated them the less willingly, and never but for some great benefit or convenience to himself; Goring without scruple, out of humour, or for wit's sake; and loved no man so well, but that he would cozen him, and then expose him to public mirth for having been cozened: therefore he had always fewer friends than the other, but more company; for no man had a with that pleased the company better. The ambition of both was unlimited, ans so equally incapable of being contented; and both unrestrained, by any respect to good-nature or justice, from pursuing the satisfaction thereof: yet Wilmot had more scruples from religion to startle him, and would not have attained his end by any gross or foul act of wickedness: Goring could have passed those pleasantly, and would, without hesitation, have broken any trust, or done any act of treachery, to have satisfied an ordinary passion or appetite; and, in truth, wanted nothing but industry (for he had wit, and courage, and understanding, and ambition, uncontrolled by any fear of God or man) to have been as eminent and successful in the highest attempt in wickedness of any man in the age he lived in, or before. Of all his qualifications, dissimulation was his masterpiece; in which he so much excelled, that men were not ordinarily ashamed, or out of countenance, with being deceived but twice by him.

-- Edward Hyde, 1st earl of Clarendon, The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England (1704)


(https://i.imgur.com/908TRTL.jpg)

Goring and Wilmot


Edited to revive image link. - R


Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Icarus on November 09, 2015, 11:13:35 PM
The word; cozen and its derivation is ample demonstration that a word can have many meanings, spellings, or implications.  That is why it is an absurdity to believe that the KJV and other books of its kind are the inerrant words of god.  Incredibly, there are some very well educated people out there who choose to ignore this kind of reality.  Not surprisingly, some of those people are aspirants to presidential candidacy.  Sheeesh!


Bart Ehrman does a persuasive, hour long, lecture about this sort of thing. The lecture is floating around in YouTube somewhere. 
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: jumbojak on November 10, 2015, 04:54:45 AM
I like snollygoster. That one will be squeeeezed into a few conversations. Thank you Recusant.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 18, 2015, 12:48:57 AM
(https://www.happyatheistforum.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fstatic.sfdict.com%2Fsizedimage%2Fsizedimage%3Fwidth%3D455%26amp%3Bheight%3D455%26amp%3Burl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fstatic.sfdict.com%252Fstatic%252Fwotd%252Ftiles%252F20151117_panglossian.png&hash=a29e69e5e658a4ca31ecb82e96f3e086530191db)


From Wiktionary: (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Panglossian)

Etymology:
From Dr. Pangloss, a character in Voltaire's Candide.

(pejorative) Naively or unreasonably optimistic.
(pejorative) Of or relating to the view that this is the best of all possible worlds.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on January 18, 2016, 10:19:43 AM
11 Classy Insults With Classical Greek and Latin Roots (http://mentalfloss.com/article/57734/11-classy-insults-classical-greek-and-latin-roots)

I can't decide which one I like best.  :sidesmile:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: OldGit on January 18, 2016, 11:44:52 AM
Nice words there, but nobody's going to be offended if you call them one of those - they'd probably assume such a posh sound has to be a compliment!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on January 18, 2016, 01:46:50 PM
Agreed, that's a fine list. I only knew two of them already: "flagitious," and "quidnunc." I wonder about "ructabunde" though, since the Oxford English Dictionary has no entry for it. "Morosoph" is just "sophomore" wearing its hat backwards--maybe the weakest on the list.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Icarus on January 19, 2016, 12:18:37 AM
That is a fine glossary of pedantic speech elements.  I liked fissilingual which is descriptive of our current crop of political operatives. It is also a similar meaning for our native American Indians who used a term to describe the lying, invader, bastards, whose goal was to steal their land.: He speaks with a forked tongue.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on February 08, 2016, 09:35:13 AM
objurgation (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/objurgation) noun \ˌäb-jər-ˈgā-shən\ (Middle English objurgacyon, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French objurgation, from Latin objurgation-, objurgatio, from objurgare to scold, blame, from ob- against + jurgare to quarrel, literally, to take to law, from jur-, jus law + -igare [from agere to lead])

: a harsh rebuke

ob·jur·gate verb

ob·jur·ga·to·ry adjective

Despite the objurgations (and worse) of the Catholic church, the Protestant Reformation brought lasting change not only to Christianity, but western society as a whole.

(https://i.imgur.com/6iQqJvB.jpg)


(https://i.imgur.com/YDq0jVk.jpg)
The spot in Oxford where Thomas Cranmer, the Archbishop of Canterbury was burnt at the stake (and before him the bishops Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley) is marked by an "X," or a cross if you will, in cobblestones in the middle of Broad Street.


Edited to revive image links. - R
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on February 10, 2016, 06:03:48 PM
labile (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/labile) adjective \ˈlā-ˌbī(-ə)l, -bəl\ (French, from Middle French, prone to err, from Late Latin labilis, from Latin labi to slip)

1 :  readily or continually undergoing chemical, physical, or biological change or breakdown :  unstable

2 :  readily open to change

la·bil·i·ty noun

QuoteThere are two features of moral cognition requiring explanation: belief in particular moral norms, and the fundamental belief that there is a normative moral reality at all. The dominant sociobiological and evolutionary psychological approach focuses on the former. It views moral norms as "epigenetic rules" that may not be fully reducible to but do emerge from genetic proclivities to adaptive behaviors: for example, incest avoidance, parental care, and repaying cooperative investments. But if these behaviors have adaptive value and we are genetically disposed to them, then why have moral norms? A common answer is that since human behavior is labile—which is itself an adaptation, but an adaptation that if unconstrained can result in disbenefits—we need "back-up mechanisms" to restrict the range of behaviors. Parents do desert or abuse their children, incest does occur, and sex and close contact with corpses do occur. Our innate repugnancies may not always be effectively constraining. In the film Lawrence of Arabia, an American reporter extols the virtues of Lawrence to Prince Faisal: "Prince, Lawrence is so merciful!" The Prince replies: "For Major Lawrence, mercy is a passion; for me, mercy is a convention. Judge for yourself which is the more reliable of the two." By the end of the movie, Lawrence is shouting, "Take no prisoners!"

— Jeffrey P. Schloss, "Darwinian Explanations of Morality: Accounting for the Normal but Not the Normative" (PDF) (http://isthmussociety.org/Documents/schloss_reading.pdf) in Understanding Moral Sentiments: Darwinian Perspectives? (2014)


(https://i.imgur.com/I3whKIW.jpg)

Bonus words:

epigenetic (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/epigenetic) adjective \ˌe-pə-jə-ˈne-tik\ (Greek epi upon + génesis generation)

1 Biology :  relating to or arising from non-genetic influences on gene expression

2 Geology : formed later than the surrounding or underlying rock formation

normative (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/normative) adjective \ˈnȯr-mə-tiv\ (French normatif, from norme norm, from Latin norma)

1 :  of, relating to, or determining norms or standards

2 :  conforming to or based on norms

3 :  prescribing norms

nor·ma·tive·ly adverb

nor·ma·tive·ness noun


Edited to revive image link. - R

Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 15, 2016, 09:28:19 AM
Dord. Dord? What's that?

https://www.facebook.com/mentalflossmagazine/videos/10153984468002365/ (https://www.facebook.com/mentalflossmagazine/videos/10153984468002365/)

:snicker:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on June 29, 2016, 07:10:54 PM
gallimaufry (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/gallimaufry) noun \ˌga-lə-ˈmȯ-frē\ (Mid 16th century: from archaic French galimafrée 'unappetizing dish', perhaps from Old French galer 'have fun' + Picard mafrer 'eat copious quantities'.)

: a confused jumble or medley of things

The opening paragraph of Thomas Shelton's 1620 translation of Miguel Cervantes' great work, The History of Don Quixote de la Mancha:

QuoteThere lived not long since, in a certain village of the Mancha, the name of whereof I porposely omit, a gentleman of their calling that use to pile up in their halls old lances, halberds, morions, and such other armours and weapons. He was, besides, master of an ancient target, a lean stallion, and a swift greyhound. His pot consisted daily of somewhat more beef than mutton: a gallimaufry each night, collops and eggs on Saturdays, lentils on Fridays, and now and then a lean pigeon on Sundays, did consume three parts of his rents; the rest and remnant thereof was spent on a jerkin of fine puce, a pair of velvet hose, with pantofles of the same for the holy-days, and one suit of the finest vesture; for therewithal he honoured and set out his person on the workdays. He had in his house a woman-servant of about forty years old, and a niece not yet twenty, and a man that served him both in field and at home, and could saddle his horse, and likewise manage a pruning-hook. The master himself was about fifty years old, of a strong complexion, dry flesh, and a withered face. He was an early riser, and a great friend of hunting. Some affirm that his surname was Quixada, or Quesada (for in this there is some variance among the authors that write his life), although it may be gathered, by very probable conjectures, that he was called Quixana. Yet all this concerns our historical relation but little: let it then suffice, that in the narration thereof we will not vary a jot from the truth.


(https://i.imgur.com/UI0L7hl.jpg)

Don Quixote
by Pablo Picasso

Bonus word:

morion (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/morion) noun \ˈmȯr-ē-ˌän\ ([from Oxford English Dictionary] Middle French morion light helmet  and its etymon Spanish morrión, murrón probably from morra crown of the head [perhaps ultimately the same Romance base as moraine mound, ridge])

: a crested metal helmet with a curved peak in front and back, worn by soldiers in the 16th and 17th centuries


(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6a/Spanish_Conqueror_Helmet.jpg/243px-Spanish_Conqueror_Helmet.jpg)

Spanish morion

Edited to revive image link. - R
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dave on June 29, 2016, 07:45:21 PM
I like words that sound grand but . . .

Exiguus.

Dionysus Exiguus sounds pretty posh but actually means, "Dennis the Humble", or could be "Dennis the Short"

Denis was a Scythian monk in the 5th-6thC whose main claim to fame was the coining of "Anno Domini" (not the yearly Italian domino tournament, that came later.)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dave on July 01, 2016, 11:02:38 AM
Cinnabar

Sounds nice, like a spice, like cinnamon maybe.

In powder form it also looks gorgeous, a rich scarlet or red, just right for an outrageous lipstick. But that could be a deadly use, cinnabar is toxic, a form of mercury oxide.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on August 25, 2016, 03:58:40 AM
louche (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/louche) adjective \ˈlüsh\ (from French, literally 'squinting')

: disreputable or sordid in a rakish or appealing way

QuoteFor many people, the Oxford-Cambridge dichotomy is an either/or proposition, like Jack Sprat and his wife, or Harvard versus Yale, or Army versus Navy. In days gone by, plebian Londoners who had been to neither university would get into loud public disputes every year about which "eight" they favored in the annual Oxford-Cambridge Boat Race from Putney to Mortlake: one of the great "who cares?" events of any epoch. For me, the similarities outdistance the distinctions. Both towns show the unoriginality of the English when it comes to names: there used to be a ford for oxen by the Thames and there was once a place where it was possible to bridge the Cam. Both have colleges rather than a university. Both took a long time to recognize the existence of the railway, so that the station is too far from the center. Some say that Cambridge is more austere and Oxford more louche and luxurious, but could even All Souls be more exotic and languid and exclusive than the Apostles' Club or the courts of Kings and Trinity, nursery of such ripe and gorgeous plants as E.M. Forster and John Maynard Keynes, to say nothing of the coterie of Stalinist traitors from Kim Philby to Sir Anthony Blunt? ("At least Oxford spies for us," as one portly academic once put it to me, "while Cambridge seems to prefer to spy for the other side.")

— Christopher Hitchens, Hitch-22 (2010)

I find that I disagree with some things Hitchens says here. For one, the delightful names that adorn some English towns. Upper Slaughter, anyone? How about Nether Wallop? The list is long, and every time I visit Britain, I discover new ones.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Kekerusey on August 25, 2016, 11:04:11 AM
Gubbins

Bits and pieces (usually of something bigger)

Keke
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 10, 2016, 04:13:04 PM
Why Is It 'Eleven, Twelve' Instead of 'Oneteen, Twoteen'? (Mentalfloss) (http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/76007/why-it-eleven-twelve-instead-oneteen-twoteen)

Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Icarus on September 11, 2016, 04:37:24 AM
^ cool link xSP. 
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on July 08, 2018, 08:34:46 PM
(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/36823199_10212340824860714_2959607572207763456_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=9d3c82c0460526f14b536f242d3726bc&oe=5BA552AD)

Good call, good call.  :golfclap:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on July 15, 2018, 07:57:54 PM
(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/37107928_233711827243491_7557091980623216640_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&oh=dcd9263e31dbd217afecd208fa9f2b2d&oe=5BC85209)

:lol:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: hermes2015 on August 03, 2018, 04:47:29 AM
(https://i.imgur.com/hyfwwNt.jpg)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Tank on August 03, 2018, 07:48:39 AM
Funny you should bring that up. Yesterday I was chatting to a new chap at work. He's 30 and Greek he'd never heard of Douglas Adams, THGTTG or the meaning of 42! So I emailed this to him. Perfect.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: hermes2015 on August 03, 2018, 10:39:24 AM
Quote from: Tank on August 03, 2018, 07:48:39 AM
Funny you should bring that up. Yesterday I was chatting to a new chap at work. He's 30 and Greek he'd never heard of Douglas Adams, THGTTG or the meaning of 42! So I emailed this to him. Perfect.

Jungian synchronicity!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Tank on August 03, 2018, 12:20:26 PM
Quote from: hermes2015 on August 03, 2018, 10:39:24 AM
Quote from: Tank on August 03, 2018, 07:48:39 AM
Funny you should bring that up. Yesterday I was chatting to a new chap at work. He's 30 and Greek he'd never heard of Douglas Adams, THGTTG or the meaning of 42! So I emailed this to him. Perfect.

Jungian synchronicity!

Apparently!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on August 03, 2018, 08:36:10 PM
corybantic (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/corybantic) adjective \ˌkȯr-ē-ˈban-tik, ˌkär-\ (Greek Corybantes (http://www.maicar.com/GML/CORYBANTES.html) [Κορύβαντες] wild attendants of the goddess Cybele, whose rites were celebrated with music and ecstatic dances)

being in the spirit or manner of a Corybant; especially : wild, frenzied

QuoteAlong with the Shade-foots (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monopod_(creature)) and the One-Eyes (http://www.livius.org/articles/concept/eye-of-the-king/) in Aristophanes' parody are another people called the Tongue-in-Bellies or Englottogasters. Their version of the anthropomorphism consists in converting the cap of the mushroom into the creature's upper body, so that it has only a head supported by its leg. Naming the top of the mushroom its 'cap' commonly implies this, as if a hat sat atop a creature wearing it. This is inescapable even in botanical nomenclature where it is called the pileus, which is Latin for 'cap.' It is not simply a cap, however, it is a skullcap, often used also to refer to the Phrygian cap, associated with Mithraism and with manumission of slaves or liberty.

In this latter significance, it was used to name the liberty-cap mushroom, a species of Psilocybe. The pileus was frequently worn under a helmet, and the helmet was of the same shape, like the ones worn by the helmeted corybantic dancers. Not infrequently, the initiatory entheogen is employed  in sub-visionary dosages for warriors on the battlefield. Heavier dosages would be involved in the visionary experience of initiatory induction to the military fraternaty, as in Mithraism and the Nordic berserkers.

-- Carl Ruck, Mark Hoffman, Entheogens, Myth, and Human Consciousness (2013)

Bonus word:

entheogen (https://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/entheogen) noun \ ĕn-thē′ō-jən \ (Greek ἔνθεος entheos inspired by the divine, possessed - γενέσθαι genesthai come into being)

A psychoactive substance, usually one derived from plants or fungi but also from the secretions of animals such as toads, that is ingested by a shaman or another participant in a ritual in order to produce visions or gain mystical insight.

(https://www.happyatheistforum.com/forum/proxy.php?request=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.tertullian.org%2Frpearse%2Fmithras%2Fimages%2Fcimrm593_mithras-slaying-bull-t.jpg&hash=7e2a1dfe35797152648313bc84d059ba3eb2b483)

Mithras wearing a Phrygian cap and killing a bull, a recurring theme in Mithraic art, known as a tauroctony (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tauroctony).

* * *

The idea presented as fact here, that both Mithraism and the berserkers made use of psychoactive drugs, is actually a hypothesis with little solid evidence supporting it. Note that one of the authors of the quoted book, Carl Ruck, had a hand in coining the term "entheogen".
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dave on August 03, 2018, 09:11:21 PM
Interesting words, Recusant, thanks.

On a side note I have often wondered about the history and long term popularity of the Phrygian cap, it was popular up to Anglo-Saxon times at least.  But, a quick Google seems to indicate a similar cap was the "badge" of freed Roman slaves, then of the French Revolutionists.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on August 10, 2018, 11:27:26 PM
horripilation (https://www.merriam-webster.com/medical/horripilation) noun \ hȯ-ˌrip-ə-ˈlā-shən, hä- \ (From late Latin horripilatio(n-), from Latin horrere 'stand on end' + pilus 'hair')

: a bristling of the hair of the head or body (as from disease, terror, or chilliness) : goose bumps

* * *

In the history of musical instruments, there are several which are known for producing visceral reactions. The skirl of a' phìob mhòr (the Great Highland bagpipe), sometimes in conjunction with drums in the stirring pipe and drum bands, or solo in the glorious piobaireachd (pibroch) has been known to result in horripilation, from fear or horror, or from sheer joy and excitement. In my own case it would be the latter.  ;D

While only a faint shadow of the glory of a live pipe and drum band, I suppose some may find the video below obnoxious. You've been forewarned.





Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on August 12, 2018, 09:48:23 PM
Quote from: Recusant on August 10, 2018, 11:27:26 PM
In the history of musical instruments, there are several which are known for producing visceral reactions. The skirl of a' phìob mhòr (the Great Highland bagpipe), sometimes in conjunction with drums in the stirring pipe and drum bands, or solo in the glorious piobaireachd (pibroch) has been known to result in horripilation, from fear or horror, or from sheer joy and excitement. In my own case it would be the latter.  ;D

:notsure: So, if you've got bad neighbours and you're lucky enough that bagpipe and drums music brings them not joy and excitement but fear and horror, you could play that music very loud in the early mornings.  ;D
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on August 12, 2018, 11:29:39 PM
Really, I've never heard a recording that does justice to hearing them in person. I've got a practice chanter, but that isn't nearly as impressive as an actual set of bagpipes. It's been a dream since childhood to have a set, but they're rather expensive.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on August 13, 2018, 12:18:46 AM
Quote from: Recusant on August 12, 2018, 11:29:39 PM
Really, I've never heard a recording that does justice to hearing them in person. I've got a practice chanter, but that isn't nearly as impressive as an actual set of bagpipes. It's been a dream since childhood to have a set, but they're rather expensive.

I like bagpipes, the sound they make is...interesting. :grin: Do you know how to play them?
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on August 13, 2018, 09:09:54 AM
I can coax a tune out of a practice chanter, but that isn't the same as playing the pipes.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Tank on August 13, 2018, 09:51:12 AM
Quote from: Recusant on August 12, 2018, 11:29:39 PM
Really, I've never heard a recording that does justice to hearing them in person. I've got a practice chanter, but that isn't nearly as impressive as an actual set of bagpipes. It's been a dream since childhood to have a set, but they're rather expensive.

How much do they cost?
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Tank on August 13, 2018, 09:52:51 AM
I paid the piper on Lindisfarne £20 to go and have lunch when I was there. Bloody racket!  >:(
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on August 13, 2018, 02:48:47 PM
Quote from: Tank on August 13, 2018, 09:51:12 AMHow much do they cost?

An "inexpensive" set using plastic rather than wood for the pipes comes to a bit over £700. A proper set could run to between about £1200 to a couple thousand pounds. Of course if you shop around and get something made in Pakistan or whatever, it would be possible to undercut those prices.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dave on August 13, 2018, 02:58:02 PM
Quote from: Recusant on August 13, 2018, 02:48:47 PM
Quote from: Tank on August 13, 2018, 09:51:12 AMHow much do they cost?

An "inexpensive" set using plastic rather than wood for the pipes comes to a bit over £700 with VAT, excluding shipping. A proper set could run to a couple thousand pounds.

I trust the bag is no longer a bladder or stomach or anything else organic!

Hey, must be a market here for a kids' version using a balloon! Another way to drive adults mad!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Tank on August 13, 2018, 04:24:03 PM
Quote from: Recusant on August 13, 2018, 02:48:47 PM
Quote from: Tank on August 13, 2018, 09:51:12 AMHow much do they cost?

An "inexpensive" set using plastic rather than wood for the pipes comes to a bit over £700. A proper set could run to between about £1200 to a couple thousand pounds. Of course if you shop around and get something made in Pakistan or whatever, it would be possible to undercut those prices.

I suppose it is hand made item with a limited market. But as you say not a trivial purchase.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: joeactor on August 13, 2018, 06:15:39 PM
Quote from: Tank on August 13, 2018, 04:24:03 PM
Quote from: Recusant on August 13, 2018, 02:48:47 PM
Quote from: Tank on August 13, 2018, 09:51:12 AMHow much do they cost?

An "inexpensive" set using plastic rather than wood for the pipes comes to a bit over £700. A proper set could run to between about £1200 to a couple thousand pounds. Of course if you shop around and get something made in Pakistan or whatever, it would be possible to undercut those prices.

I suppose it is hand made item with a limited market. But as you say not a trivial purchase.

There's a bagpiper who plays at one of the parks where we hike. He's very good. Still not a huge fan of the music...
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dave on August 13, 2018, 06:28:10 PM
I must admit that a full pipe and drum band can be moving - in the right place at the right time!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: hermes2015 on August 14, 2018, 05:55:08 AM
(https://i.imgur.com/jUlxhLe.jpg)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Icarus on August 15, 2018, 12:40:25 AM
^ not a suitable cup for church groups or mixed company of the gentile variety.   :faints:

(I would like one of those cups, alas. )
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Bluenose on August 15, 2018, 02:08:37 AM
That cup pretty well summarises most of the things people write that really bug me.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 06, 2018, 03:47:53 AM
(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/40773645_10214930886360001_4299159622167560192_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&oh=fe4aaed79d6fcc863279f11013fcede2&oe=5C3133BE)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 06, 2018, 04:00:53 AM
Quote from: xSilverPhinx on September 06, 2018, 03:47:53 AM
(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/40773645_10214930886360001_4299159622167560192_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&oh=fe4aaed79d6fcc863279f11013fcede2&oe=5C3133BE)

I've tried to find this translation. Where did you get it? I think it's funny as hell, but can't find the translation.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 06, 2018, 04:20:00 AM
Quote from: Fireball on September 06, 2018, 04:00:53 AM
I've tried to find this translation. Where did you get it? I think it's funny as hell, but can't find the translation.

It showed up on my FB feed.

QuoteThe etymology of Cerberus' name is uncertain. Ogden[136] refers to attempts to establish an Indo-European etymology as "not yet successful". It has been claimed to be related to the Sanskrit word सर्वरा sarvarā, used as an epithet of one of the dogs of Yama, from a Proto-Indo-European word *k̑érberos, meaning "spotted".[137] Lincoln (1991),[138] among others, critiques this etymology. Lincoln notes a similarity between Cerberus and the Norse mythological dog Garmr, relating both names to a Proto-Indo-European root *ger- "to growl" (perhaps with the suffixes -*m/*b and -*r). However, as Ogden observes, this analysis actually requires Kerberos and Garmr to be derived from two different Indo-European roots (*ker- and *gher- respectively), and so does not actually establish a relationship between the two names.

Though probably not Greek, Greek etymologies for Cerberus have been offered. An etymology given by Servius (the late-fourth-century commentator on Virgil)—but rejected by Ogden—derives Cerberus from the Greek word creoboros meaning "flesh-devouring".[139] Another suggested etymology derives Cerberus from "Ker berethrou", meaning "evil of the pit".[140]

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerberus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerberus)

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Cerberus (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Cerberus)

Apparently, the origin of Cerebrus' name is not at all certain. It would be funny as hell if it were 'Spot' or 'Spotted', though!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 06, 2018, 08:25:06 PM
Quote from: xSilverPhinx on September 06, 2018, 04:20:00 AM
Quote from: Fireball on September 06, 2018, 04:00:53 AM
I've tried to find this translation. Where did you get it? I think it's funny as hell, but can't find the translation.

It showed up on my FB feed.

QuoteThe etymology of Cerberus' name is uncertain. Ogden[136] refers to attempts to establish an Indo-European etymology as "not yet successful". It has been claimed to be related to the Sanskrit word सर्वरा sarvarā, used as an epithet of one of the dogs of Yama, from a Proto-Indo-European word *k̑érberos, meaning "spotted".[137] Lincoln (1991),[138] among others, critiques this etymology. Lincoln notes a similarity between Cerberus and the Norse mythological dog Garmr, relating both names to a Proto-Indo-European root *ger- "to growl" (perhaps with the suffixes -*m/*b and -*r). However, as Ogden observes, this analysis actually requires Kerberos and Garmr to be derived from two different Indo-European roots (*ker- and *gher- respectively), and so does not actually establish a relationship between the two names.

Though probably not Greek, Greek etymologies for Cerberus have been offered. An etymology given by Servius (the late-fourth-century commentator on Virgil)—but rejected by Ogden—derives Cerberus from the Greek word creoboros meaning "flesh-devouring".[139] Another suggested etymology derives Cerberus from "Ker berethrou", meaning "evil of the pit".[140]

From: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerberus (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerberus)

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Cerberus (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Cerberus)

Apparently, the origin of Cerebrus' name is not at all certain. It would be funny as hell if it were 'Spot' or 'Spotted', though!

Thanks for the info! Yes, "Spot" would be pretty amusing.  :D
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 19, 2018, 12:55:00 AM
(https://pics.me.me/karthik-balakrishnan-karthikb351-was-slightly-mindblown-when-discovered-this-the-31909787.png)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dave on September 19, 2018, 08:37:03 AM
Quote from: xSilverPhinx on September 19, 2018, 12:55:00 AM
(https://pics.me.me/karthik-balakrishnan-karthikb351-was-slightly-mindblown-when-discovered-this-the-31909787.png)

That's one of my favourites! Have used it to show how a normally 'silent', in English pronounciation at least, letter gets pronounced when its word is in a combination.

Those who converted Greek pronounciation for use by other languages, and left us with many 'silent' letters, can either be cursed or praised depending on how you view language, as a subject of mere learning or intense interest!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on October 21, 2019, 12:05:15 AM
(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/73048922_2073322439433859_6569224544488259584_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&_nc_oc=AQmGNQq5M_4tGb8bd1MT7709DQUszwXjHoQuz0OjrZ4_UigIAkfyC4ph_PPOdYeuaoA&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa13-1.fna&oh=e1d0fc2616279f7f489d03b2fffe77c1&oe=5E1ED1C9)

It's what I do...when I'm alone. :deadpan:

:P
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Red_Cloud on October 21, 2019, 05:14:55 AM
(https://i.pinimg.com/236x/90/72/93/90729387950ce4ed1da31b94ba6d09bb.jpg)

Well! . . .Shit and fall back in it! I've  posted in the rung thread. Sorry! :chairhide:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: hermes2015 on October 21, 2019, 05:18:41 AM
Quote from: xSilverPhinx on October 21, 2019, 12:05:15 AM
(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/73048922_2073322439433859_6569224544488259584_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&_nc_oc=AQmGNQq5M_4tGb8bd1MT7709DQUszwXjHoQuz0OjrZ4_UigIAkfyC4ph_PPOdYeuaoA&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa13-1.fna&oh=e1d0fc2616279f7f489d03b2fffe77c1&oe=5E1ED1C9)

It's what I do...when I'm alone. :deadpan:

:P

You're too modest; I am sure you actually look like this.

(https://i.imgur.com/XMEpfHc.jpg)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on October 22, 2019, 04:05:49 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on October 21, 2019, 05:18:41 AM
Quote from: xSilverPhinx on October 21, 2019, 12:05:15 AM
(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/73048922_2073322439433859_6569224544488259584_n.jpg?_nc_cat=1&_nc_oc=AQmGNQq5M_4tGb8bd1MT7709DQUszwXjHoQuz0OjrZ4_UigIAkfyC4ph_PPOdYeuaoA&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa13-1.fna&oh=e1d0fc2616279f7f489d03b2fffe77c1&oe=5E1ED1C9)

It's what I do...when I'm alone. :deadpan:

:P

You're too modest; I am sure you actually look like this.

(https://i.imgur.com/XMEpfHc.jpg)

She looks graceful. :tellmemore:

*enters envious mode*

But in that pic looks like she's tripping on air.

*leaves envious mode*

Still graceful, though. :tellmemore:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on May 17, 2020, 09:51:17 PM
poliorcetics (https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/poliorcetics) noun  \ˌpȯl-ē-ȯr-ˈset-iks\ (Post-classical Latin poliorcetica siege engines, from Ancient Greek πολιορκητικά poliorkētiká, "things related to sieges")

: the art of siege warfare, namely, that of conducting or resisting a siege

pol·i·or·cet·ic adjective  : of or related to sieges

In the excerpt below, the army that marched south from Lyons to Béziers at the beginning of the Albigensian Crusade (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albigensian_Crusade) is being described. The attack on Béziers lead to one of the massacres of the war (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Massacre_at_B%C3%A9ziers) during which the infamous line "Caedite eos. Novit enim Dominus qui sunt eius." ("Kill them. For the Lord knows those that are His own.") was said to have been uttered by the Papal legate Arnaud Amalric. This in response to a question of how to determine which citizens of the place were heretics and which were not, and therefore who should be spared.

QuoteSuch an army [between 20,000 and 30,000] required impressive logistical support. Camp followers included priests, cooks, victualling masters, tradesmen supplying food and wine, blacksmiths, carpenters, wagoners and mule drivers, often under the instruction of quartermasters. Again, this number would fluctuate as the army progressed through villages and towns, where further food and supplies could be requisitioned. Of course, many were expected to turn their hand to a whole range of practical roles. In the most powerful contingents were specialist engineers to operate the siege machinery and direct miners to sap the walls of the enemy. These formed an essential branch of any campaigning army. Philip of France's success at war owed much to his skill in poliorcetics (siegecraft). He was known to take his engineers everywhere and they proved their worth time and again.

— Sean McGlynn Kill Them All: Cathars and Carnage in the Albigensian Crusade (2015)

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5a/Albigensian_Crusade_01.jpg)
From the Chroniques de Saint-Denis. On the left, Pope Innocent III excommunicates the Cathars. On the right, the men of the pope kill Cathars.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Icarus on May 23, 2020, 12:25:36 AM
^ hooray for engineers.  f=Ma and all that other good stuff they know about projectile launchers, re-curved bows, battering rams, pontoon  bridges, and  such.

My word for the day is: so.  It is a perfectly well understood word but it has come into widespread use in a puzzling way.  I listen to NPR radio programs and there are lots of interviews with impressively educated people.  Why then do so many of them begin their sentences with the subjectively meaningless word SO??   I have also noticed politicians and salespeople using that prefix for a reply.  For example: What day is it?  reply; "so it is friday"   So it is a day in May. ....etc. 

Not long ago the operative word, especially among teenagers was "Like" . That one has faded somewhat and is now replaced with other verbal quirks that defy understanding. An amazing array of people use the tern "you know" as a filler for a verbal pause. 

Alright I know that I am being a picky bastard.  Just the same,  my high school English teacher would have rapped my knuckles with a ruler for such  verbal or written language litter.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Randy on May 23, 2020, 12:55:06 AM
Quote from: Icarus on May 23, 2020, 12:25:36 AM
^ hooray for engineers.  f=Ma and all that other good stuff they know about projectile launchers, re-curved bows, battering rams, pontoon  bridges, and  such.

My word for the day is: so.  It is a perfectly well understood word but it has come into widespread use in a puzzling way.  I listen to NPR radio programs and there are lots of interviews with impressively educated people.  Why then do so many of them begin their sentences with the subjectively meaningless word SO??   I have also noticed politicians and salespeople using that prefix for a reply.  For example: What day is it?  reply; "so it is friday"   So it is a day in May. ....etc. 

Not long ago the operative word, especially among teenagers was "Like" . That one has faded somewhat and is now replaced with other verbal quirks that defy understanding. An amazing array of people use the tern "you know" as a filler for a verbal pause. 

Alright I know that I am being a picky bastard.  Just the same,  my high school English teacher would have rapped my knuckles with a ruler for such  verbal or written language litter.

I used to tell my daughter what "like" meant. She knew of course but kept using it incorrectly. Now she's 35 and she's having to watch herself. She's a project leader with eleven employees beneath her. She doesn't want to sound like the teenager she once was.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Magdalena on August 01, 2020, 06:07:56 AM
I found this one in the Urban Dictionary:

Cornteen
Internet slang for "quarantine", originating from the many times people misspelled that word on social media during the COVID-19 or coronavirus crisis. Often used in posts expressing boredom or frustration related to self-quarantine or 'social distancing' measures.

Sometimes also (mis)spelled 'corn teen', 'corn and teen', 'corn in teen' or 'corn of teen'.
"Wow, They Making Us Self Cornteen"
"I may not be making babies during this corn teen but by god I'm thinkin about it"
"I've been drunk almost everyday of corn and teen"
"Really regret not getting my eyebrows done before corn of teen"
"What y'all doing for the corn in teen?"

:snicker:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Randy on August 01, 2020, 04:06:20 PM
Quote from: Magdalena on August 01, 2020, 06:07:56 AM
I found this one in the Urban Dictionary:

Cornteen
Internet slang for "quarantine", originating from the many times people misspelled that word on social media during the COVID-19 or coronavirus crisis. Often used in posts expressing boredom or frustration related to self-quarantine or 'social distancing' measures.

Sometimes also (mis)spelled 'corn teen', 'corn and teen', 'corn in teen' or 'corn of teen'.
"Wow, They Making Us Self Cornteen"
"I may not be making babies during this corn teen but by god I'm thinkin about it"
"I've been drunk almost everyday of corn and teen"
"Really regret not getting my eyebrows done before corn of teen"
"What y'all doing for the corn in teen?"

:snicker:
They sound like phrases from the sticks here in Georgia. It wouldn't surprise me at all if someone said one of those to me or if I overhear one.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Magdalena on August 02, 2020, 04:27:51 AM
Quote from: Randy on August 01, 2020, 04:06:20 PM
Quote from: Magdalena on August 01, 2020, 06:07:56 AM
I found this one in the Urban Dictionary:

Cornteen
Internet slang for "quarantine", originating from the many times people misspelled that word on social media during the COVID-19 or coronavirus crisis. Often used in posts expressing boredom or frustration related to self-quarantine or 'social distancing' measures.

Sometimes also (mis)spelled 'corn teen', 'corn and teen', 'corn in teen' or 'corn of teen'.
"Wow, They Making Us Self Cornteen"
"I may not be making babies during this corn teen but by god I'm thinkin about it"
"I've been drunk almost everyday of corn and teen"
"Really regret not getting my eyebrows done before corn of teen"
"What y'all doing for the corn in teen?"

:snicker:
They sound like phrases from the sticks here in Georgia. It wouldn't surprise me at all if someone said one of those to me or if I overhear one.
Please excuse my ignorance but what is this?  :notsure:
"sticks here in Georgia."
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: No one on August 02, 2020, 05:42:42 AM
The boonies.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Magdalena on August 02, 2020, 06:31:46 AM
Quote from: No one on August 02, 2020, 05:42:42 AM
The boonies.
Ah!
Thank you, No one.  :)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: No one on August 02, 2020, 06:46:10 AM
You're welcome, raps.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: billy rubin on August 02, 2020, 09:24:43 PM
Quote from: Magdalena on August 02, 2020, 06:31:46 AM
Quote from: No one on August 02, 2020, 05:42:42 AM
The boonies.
Ah!
Thank you, No one.  :)

i\ve wondered about "sticks."

there used to be a phrase, "beyond the pale . . ." which some people claim referred to being beyond a frontier terriotry in ireland. i alwasys wondered whether it referred to being beyond the pale fence of a medieval fortification, so being "beyond the pale" would mean "outside established jurisdiction."

i just looked it up, and found that i wasn't first with the idea"
Quote
From pale ("jurisdiction of an authority, territory under an authority's jurisdiction"), suggesting that anything outside the authority's jurisdiction was uncivilized. The phrase was in use by the mid-17th century, and may be a reference to the general sense of boundary, but is often understood to refer specifically to the English Pale in Ireland. In the nominally English territory of Ireland, only the Pale fell genuinely under the authority of English law, hence the terms within the pale and beyond the pale. The boundary of the Ashdown Forest (a royal hunting forest) was also known as the Pale, consisting of a paled fence and a ditch inside, to allow deer to jump in, but not back out.

anyway, out "in the sticks," sounds suspiciously like an updated version of"beyond the pale" to me, so i've wondered whether there was a connection.

Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Randy on August 02, 2020, 11:08:32 PM
I don't know, Billy, I simply haven't a clue. It is something my father said often and I've picked it up. I've heard it a time or two from people my age. I don't know why "sticks" is used for "boondocks" either.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: No one on August 02, 2020, 11:09:35 PM
Sticks, is cityfolk speak for the woods.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on August 03, 2020, 02:45:29 AM
Quote from: No one on August 02, 2020, 11:09:35 PM
Sticks, is cityfolk speak for the woods.

Not just cityfolk. When I was growing up out in the sticks the term was commonly used there to mean "out in the woods; well away from civilization."
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: No one on August 03, 2020, 03:09:24 AM
You were cityfolk to those stickeins.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dark Lightning on August 03, 2020, 03:27:30 AM
Pff. Where I grew up(southern California), it was sand, sagebrush and cacti! Might as well have been Australia, what with the rattlesnakes and the black widow spiders.  We didn't even HAVE trees! ;D
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Recusant on August 03, 2020, 04:29:58 AM
Quote from: No one on August 03, 2020, 03:09:24 AM
You were cityfolk to those stickeins.

That explains a lot.  Now some things fall into perspective. :lol:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: hermes2015 on August 03, 2020, 04:52:04 AM
You guys with your reminiscences are heading in this direction.

Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Davin on August 03, 2020, 03:47:48 PM
I've also hear BFE or "Bum Fuck Egypt" which means in the middle of nowhere. In case the place where you're at is way out there but not in the trees.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Randy on August 03, 2020, 08:29:29 PM
Quote from: Dark Lightning on August 03, 2020, 03:27:30 AM
Pff. Where I grew up(southern California), it was sand, sagebrush and cacti! Might as well have been Australia, what with the rattlesnakes and the black widow spiders.  We didn't even HAVE trees! ;D
Ha! Where I grew up (Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia) we had pythons slithering down the trees and alligators swimming around with water moccasins. We lived on a raft we did made out of toothpicks. We had to space ourselves evenly so as not to capsize!

(In truth I was a military brat and lived in many places and had it nice. We were poor but somehow my parents managed to scrape by.)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 14, 2020, 12:13:12 PM
(https://scontent.fpoa4-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/131331141_3057961130969980_7083719194487381709_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&ccb=2&_nc_sid=2c4854&_nc_ohc=BW2FDfl-ki4AX9qjNtG&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa4-1.fna&oh=3b047322c63ed944f30c88f2a18b7782&oe=5FFB08E4)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Tank on December 14, 2020, 12:39:35 PM
I'm sure I've seen this before!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on February 23, 2021, 12:59:17 AM
(https://scontent.fpoa1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/153593185_10224461951954329_8659390316333956988_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&ccb=3&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_eui2=AeHF_1I7bEq4GmrgLDxNJFC89L2l8GE1PP70vaXwYTU8_jSbteV0-rr9bm-EI050tqAhmdAy24b_152sLo75IJ2J&_nc_ohc=LQL6XrAefE8AX-Trznz&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa1-1.fna&oh=28d1557c941cbe912d6ab6a7f9e09b3c&oe=605A0506)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Randy on February 23, 2021, 02:06:51 AM
Quote from: xSilverPhinx on February 23, 2021, 12:59:17 AM
(https://scontent.fpoa1-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/153593185_10224461951954329_8659390316333956988_n.jpg?_nc_cat=104&ccb=3&_nc_sid=825194&_nc_eui2=AeHF_1I7bEq4GmrgLDxNJFC89L2l8GE1PP70vaXwYTU8_jSbteV0-rr9bm-EI050tqAhmdAy24b_152sLo75IJ2J&_nc_ohc=LQL6XrAefE8AX-Trznz&_nc_ht=scontent.fpoa1-1.fna&oh=28d1557c941cbe912d6ab6a7f9e09b3c&oe=605A0506)
I like it!
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 12:55:47 PM
Procaffeinating / (proˈkæfɪ'nat'ing)

(v.)1) Not willing to do anything until you've had a cup of coffee. 2) Useless life-form.

Similar words: Dead, empty, uncharged.

Used in a sentence.
Bruno was asked to join the very early morning conference call with the team in Korea, however. His responses were less than adequate, and drew some criticism, but as he was procaffeinating he really didn't give a damn.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Bad Penny II on September 15, 2021, 01:47:16 PM
Quote from: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 12:55:47 PM
Procaffeinating / (proˈkæfɪ'nat'ing)

(v.)1) Not willing to do anything until you've had a cup of coffee. 2) Useless life-form.

Similar words: Dead, empty, uncharged.

Used in a sentence.
Bruno was asked to join the very early morning conference call with the team in Korea, however. His responses were less than adequate, and drew some criticism, but as he was procaffeinating he really didn't give a damn.

Wouldn't precaffeinating work better, ye, maybe, I don't know.
You can't say "I don't know" anymore, Trump fucked up the use of it.
Ye, he did, the fkn trump, he'd use "I don't know" as code for "am I right?" as a call to the fkn trumpians.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 02:39:42 PM
Quote from: Bad Penny II on September 15, 2021, 01:47:16 PM
Quote from: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 12:55:47 PM
Procaffeinating / (proˈkæfɪ'nat'ing)

(v.)1) Not willing to do anything until you've had a cup of coffee. 2) Useless life-form.

Similar words: Dead, empty, uncharged.

Used in a sentence.
Bruno was asked to join the very early morning conference call with the team in Korea, however. His responses were less than adequate, and drew some criticism, but as he was procaffeinating he really didn't give a damn.

Wouldn't precaffeinating work better, ye, maybe, I don't know.
You can't say "I don't know" anymore, Trump fucked up the use of it.
Ye, he did, the fkn trump, he'd use "I don't know" as code for "am I right?" as a call to the fkn trumpians.

Aye, precaffeinating would work, however. My plan was to join the call which was at 3am, and then when it was over go back to bed for another hour an a half which is what I did....Trump fucked up the use of so many words. I won't use the word "huge" anymore. When I have said "huge", I tend to say it in a mocking tone (More like Alec Baldwins Trump impression than the real Trump)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Magdalena on September 15, 2021, 07:14:43 PM
Quote from: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 12:55:47 PM
Procaffeinating / (proˈkæfɪ'nat'ing)

(v.)1) Not willing to do anything until you've had a cup of coffee. 2) Useless life-form.
...
I like this word. Nothing exists before you have your coffee. Just emptiness, grumpiness, a super bright sun, and a headache.

"Procaffeinating is a bitch when you have to take your ugly pooping dog for a walk, early in the morning."

Did I use the word correctly?
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 07:23:54 PM
Quote from: Magdalena on September 15, 2021, 07:14:43 PM
Quote from: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 12:55:47 PM
Procaffeinating / (proˈkæfɪ'nat'ing)

(v.)1) Not willing to do anything until you've had a cup of coffee. 2) Useless life-form.
...
I like this word. Nothing exists before you have your coffee. Just emptiness, grumpiness, a super bright sun, and a headache.

"Procaffeinating is a bitch when you have to take your ugly pooping dog for a walk, early in the morning."

Did I use the word correctly?

Yes, you did, and I'm so happy you like the word...I feel the same about life before coffee. You and I have soooo much in common Mags, sigh :)

Your sentence did have a few slight, grammatical errors in it, but I fixed it for you my friend 8)

"Procaffeinating is a bitch when you have to take your ugly, pooping Kat for a walk early in the morning."

Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Magdalena on September 15, 2021, 07:57:18 PM
Quote from: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 07:23:54 PM
Quote from: Magdalena on September 15, 2021, 07:14:43 PM
Quote from: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 12:55:47 PM
Procaffeinating / (proˈkæfɪ'nat'ing)

(v.)1) Not willing to do anything until you've had a cup of coffee. 2) Useless life-form.
...
I like this word. Nothing exists before you have your coffee. Just emptiness, grumpiness, a super bright sun, and a headache.

"Procaffeinating is a bitch when you have to take your ugly pooping dog for a walk, early in the morning."

Did I use the word correctly?

Yes, you did, and I'm so happy you like the word...I feel the same about life before coffee. You and I have soooo much in common Mags, sigh :)
...
Unfortunately, yes, yes we do.  :felix:

Quote from: Papasito Bruno on September 15, 2021, 07:23:54 PM
"Procaffeinating is a bitch when you have to take your ugly, pooping Kat for a walk early in the morning."

(https://c.tenor.com/AEuOxthvq7UAAAAC/dragging-feet-mondays.gif)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: billy rubin on September 16, 2021, 01:15:31 AM
barniculate

verb

the transformation of juvenile-barnicle instars into fully-formed reproductive barnicle adults
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Papasito Bruno on September 16, 2021, 06:54:53 PM
Quote from: billy rubin on September 16, 2021, 01:15:31 AM
barniculate

verb

the transformation of juvenile-barnicle instars into fully-formed reproductive barnicle adults

I was curious about this word, so I searched for it on Google (I thought it had to do with folk who work on farms, like..."Oh, I can barniculate, so let me explain to them how to properly store the hay in the barn")

It's such a common word that the forum came in as the number two listing in my search (2nd out of 3 results!!)

(https://i.imgur.com/7rfxtUQ.png)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Ecurb Noselrub on September 16, 2021, 07:10:46 PM
Quote from: billy rubin on September 16, 2021, 01:15:31 AM
barniculate

verb

the transformation of juvenile-barnicle instars into fully-formed reproductive barnicle adults

This is two for the price of one.  I had to look up "instars", as well.  I feel quite educated.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 16, 2021, 07:26:56 PM
Nullifidian

noun
a person having no faith or religious belief.

adjective
having no faith or religious belief.

Via Oxford Languages

Seems sort of effete, but I like it.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Icarus on September 17, 2021, 12:43:25 AM
Barniculate....barnacles......The scourge of weekend mariners who have a boat at the marina. Sometimes referred to as miserable fuckin' marine growth..................Did you know that the majority of barnacles are Hermorphodites?   Another of natures peculiarities.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dark Lightning on September 17, 2021, 02:31:11 AM
Quote from: Icarus on September 17, 2021, 12:43:25 AM
Barniculate....barnacles......The scourge of weekend mariners who have a boat at the marina. Sometimes referred to as miserable fuckin' marine growth..................Did you know that the majority of barnacles are Hermorphodites?   Another of natures peculiarities.

You've seen the miserable creatures! A "face" only a mother could love...
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: billy rubin on September 17, 2021, 01:56:25 PM
barniculism

noun

a proverb or aphorism attributed to a barnicle, said to be audible only at low water when the colonies are exposed

johnny would often sit on the mole at ebb tide, hoping to overhear barniculisms from tbe muttering cirripedia.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: billy rubin on September 18, 2021, 05:25:18 PM
Quote from: Icarus on September 17, 2021, 12:43:25 AM
Barniculate....barnacles......The scourge of weekend mariners who have a boat at the marina. Sometimes referred to as miserable fuckin' marine growth..................Did you know that the majority of barnacles are Hermorphodites?   Another of natures peculiarities.

whats not to love about barnicles?

i mean, if you dont have a boat

barnicles are cool. theyre really little shrimp that hang out together and wave their little body parts in the seawater.

who cant sympathize with that?
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: billy rubin on September 18, 2021, 05:30:35 PM

barniculore

noun

the aggragate collection of myths, legends, and folk culture of the cirripedia, consisting of origin accounts, eschatology, proverbs, and wisdom. as barnicles are sessile except during the medusoid stage, there is great variety in the oral traditions of each regional population.

johnny was a student of local barniculore, and was primarily responsible for its wide appreciation among students of contemporary invertebrate literature
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Ecurb Noselrub on September 19, 2021, 02:09:19 PM
Barnaclehung - hung like a barnacle.  Their penises are up to 8 times their body length.  This is what evolution does when you just sit at home and copulate with the neighbors.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Papasito Bruno on September 19, 2021, 04:33:25 PM
Quote from: Ecurb Noselrub on September 19, 2021, 02:09:19 PM
Barnaclehung - hung like a barnacle.  Their penises are up to 8 times their body length.  This is what evolution does when you just sit at home and copulate with the neighbors.

Barnacle penises are actually the number 10 of weird animal penises....just give a listen to Florence explain.




P.S. - If anyone ever checks my search history, they'll wonder what the strange hell I'm doing searching for Barnacle Penises...thanks HAF/Bruce  ::)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: billy rubin on September 19, 2021, 05:14:07 PM
barniculee

noun

the region within the intertidal zone of a barnacle colony which is temporarily sheltered from the tidal stream during the ebb and flood tides, a region of low laminar flow and high turbulence, coupled with a low concentrations of plankton. during flood tide, the barniculee is landward; at ebb tide, it is seaward.

careful observes will be able to hear the barnacles celebrate the arrival of slack water by their joyous cries of "luff! luff!" followed soon after by silence as they extend their cirri into the current and begin to feed

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BM1VBb0BgLo
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Papasito Bruno on October 07, 2021, 05:54:53 PM
Agnorant

adjective

/ˈag-n(ə-)rənt

Definition of agnorant

1.    lacking knowledge or education, extremely ignorant
2.   simultaneously extremly arrogant.

Example: People who believe they know more about science than the scientists are very agnorant.

Synonyms
benighted, illeterate, American, analphabetic, Conservative,uneducated, Republican, unlettered, Christian.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: xSilverPhinx on October 07, 2021, 07:11:23 PM
Quote from: Papasito Bruno on October 07, 2021, 05:54:53 PM
Agnorant

adjective

/ˈag-n(ə-)rənt

Definition of agnorant

1.    lacking knowledge or education, extremely ignorant
2.   simultaneously extremly arrogant.

Example: People who believe they know more about science than the scientists are very agnorant.

Synonyms
benighted, illeterate, American, analphabetic, Conservative,uneducated, Republican, unlettered, Christian.

Love it :grin:
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dark Lightning on October 07, 2021, 07:37:21 PM
SOME Americans, anyway.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Icarus on October 11, 2021, 05:12:35 AM
Quote from: Dark Lightning on October 07, 2021, 07:37:21 PM
SOME Americans, anyway.

A frightening lot of Americans I fear.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Dark Lightning on October 11, 2021, 02:30:17 PM
Quote from: Icarus on October 11, 2021, 05:12:35 AM
Quote from: Dark Lightning on October 07, 2021, 07:37:21 PM
SOME Americans, anyway.

A frightening lot of Americans I fear.

Too damned many, I have to agree.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Papasito Bruno on October 13, 2021, 05:54:00 PM
I was thinking,...if you spell the word "wrong" wrong, your haven't spelled it right, so therefore it's wrong, but it's also not wrong, because it's not right. Right? ::)
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Ecurb Noselrub on October 14, 2021, 05:56:13 PM
Quote from: Papasito Bruno on October 13, 2021, 05:54:00 PM
I was thinking,...if you spell the word "wrong" wrong, your haven't spelled it right, so therefore it's wrong, but it's also not wrong, because it's not right. Right? ::)

Well, two wrongs don't make a right, so it you are spell wrong wrong, you have two wrongs and it can't be right.  It is still wrong.  But I have always contended that three wrongs do make a right, so if you spell the wrong wrong wrong, it is OK, because after three wrongs, it becomes an accepted way of doing things. Now, what happens if you spell wrong wrong by spelling it Wong?  Then it becomes an international matter, and the Chinese will claim that we are blaming them for all wrongs, and they will incarcerate all American tourists named Long, saying that they are the source of all that is wrong.
Title: Re: A Word for the Day
Post by: Papasito Bruno on October 16, 2021, 09:23:04 PM
I think this it a good place to place this, but l could be wong. ;D

(https://i.imgur.com/ade2iZK.png)