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#1
Laid Back Lounge / Re: Jokes Thread (Was named An...
Last post by billy rubin - May 20, 2022, 01:37:50 PM
^^^this stuff bothers me.

ever heard of marjoe gortner?



https://www.so4j.com/marjoe-false-teacher/
#2
Laid Back Lounge / Re: What's on your mind today?
Last post by billy rubin - May 20, 2022, 12:03:34 PM


9000 pounds of styrofoam. easy to load, not so easy to tie down.

i have no abnormal fear of heights, but i still hate walking around 14 feet over the concrete trying to arrange the straps. too many issues if i fall off.
#3
Current Events / Re: Roe vs Wade under fire, ag...
Last post by Asmodean - May 20, 2022, 07:18:44 AM
Quote from: Recusant on May 20, 2022, 06:49:43 AMIn the theory of government behind the US Constitution, all power and rights are held by the people. The people elect representatives to administer those powers and rights. Thus the 9th Amendment. In this understanding, government does not and can not bestow "new rights." It protects and regulates rights, which are inherent to the people.

A right to privacy is implicitly acknowledged in the Bill of Rights, including the 1st Amendment, the 3rd Amendment, the 4th Amendment and the 5th Amendment. In addition, the due process clause of the 14th Amendment was cited by the US Supreme Court as protecting a right to freedom from undue interference (aka a right to privacy) long before Roe v. Wade.
I see what you are saying, and yet I also see what seems to be reasonable legal arguments that go the other way.

That said, if the right to privacy is protection from "undue" interference, then wherein lies "undue?"
#4
Current Events / Re: Roe vs Wade under fire, ag...
Last post by Recusant - May 20, 2022, 06:49:43 AM
In the theory of government behind the US Constitution, all power and rights are held by the people. The people elect representatives to administer those powers and rights. Thus the 9th Amendment. In this understanding, government does not and can not bestow "new rights." It protects and regulates rights, which are inherent to the people.

A right to privacy is implicitly acknowledged in the Bill of Rights, including the 1st Amendment, the 3rd Amendment, the 4th Amendment and the 5th Amendment. In addition, the due process clause of the 14th Amendment was cited by the US Supreme Court as protecting a right to freedom from undue interference (aka a right to privacy) long before Roe v. Wade.
#5
Laid Back Lounge / Re: Jokes Thread (Was named An...
Last post by Icarus - May 20, 2022, 05:27:12 AM
The Jokes thread?  I am not sure who the joke is on in this video. Maybe more evil than humorous. 



Unintentional thread derail? 












 

No wonder that the Trump group is so capable of conning the common folk.
#6
Laid Back Lounge / Re: Jokes Thread (Was named An...
Last post by Dark Lightning - May 20, 2022, 03:44:57 AM
Blankety-Blank-Blank humor is where it's at!  :P
#7
Laid Back Lounge / Re: Jokes Thread (Was named An...
Last post by Icarus - May 20, 2022, 03:30:58 AM
Sorry about the two blank posts.  Must have been the silly season for me.  I will make an actual post when the appropriate occasion arises.
#8
Current Events / Re: Another Mass Shooting
Last post by billy rubin - May 19, 2022, 02:54:16 PM
yes.

switzerland has a rifle in every closet.

the american problem is not the gun, its the americans.
#9
Current Events / Re: Roe vs Wade under fire, ag...
Last post by Asmodean - May 19, 2022, 01:13:18 PM
Quote from: Anne D. on May 19, 2022, 12:53:54 PM
Quote from: Asmodean on May 19, 2022, 07:19:11 AMThing is though, the constitution itself is subject to change

Of course. In practice, it's very difficult and rare, especially in later decades. (See the fight for the ERA.)

You seemed to have no knowledge of the role the U.S. judicial branch plays. I was explaining that to you.
Indeed, and I did not contest any part of your explanation - just the overarching theme of where a law comes from. There is a reason for dividing the government into three branches - that way, none can (or, supposed to be able to) mess with the nation too badly.

If indeed there is a need for a new right, the judicial branch is the wrong place to get it from as the only way they can, is by creatively reading existing law.
#10
Current Events / Re: Roe vs Wade under fire, ag...
Last post by Anne D. - May 19, 2022, 12:53:54 PM
Quote from: Asmodean on May 19, 2022, 07:19:11 AMThing is though, the constitution itself is subject to change

Of course. In practice, it's very difficult and rare, especially in later decades. (See the fight for the ERA.)

You seemed to have no knowledge of the role the U.S. judicial branch plays. I was explaining that to you.