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Workshop and fixit stuff

Started by Dave, July 10, 2017, 07:26:50 PM

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Dark Lightning

Indeed. Until 1971, Chrysler Corp. used left-hand threaded lug nuts and studs, and the same for the spindles and nuts on the left side of their vehicles.

hermes2015

Quote from: billy rubin on February 07, 2021, 09:03:51 PM
that doesnt work in my life.

there are various left hand fastenerz on the stuff that i work on and i have to stop and stare at the parts before i can remember which fasteners go which way

Left hand threads, like the regulators on hydrogen cylinders, can be dis-orienting.
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Dark Lightning

Quote from: hermes2015 on February 08, 2021, 03:04:29 AM
Quote from: billy rubin on February 07, 2021, 09:03:51 PM
that doesnt work in my life.

there are various left hand fastenerz on the stuff that i work on and i have to stop and stare at the parts before i can remember which fasteners go which way

Left hand threads, like the regulators on hydrogen cylinders, can be dis-orienting.

There is a serious safety reason for left-hand threads on Hydrogen gas cylinders! Acetylene tanks are threaded left-handed for that same reason. It's going to be interesting to see what happens if/when hydrogen is a "commonly-dispensed" fuel. It used to be that gas station attendants were competent for the task of dispensing gasoline. Hydrogen is in a completely different regime. Some of the druggies I worked with when dispensing fuel won't even be able to handle that safely.

BoT, I made a couple of items that I will post, as soon as I take some pictures.

hermes2015

Quote from: Dark Lightning on February 08, 2021, 03:44:20 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on February 08, 2021, 03:04:29 AM
Quote from: billy rubin on February 07, 2021, 09:03:51 PM
that doesnt work in my life.

there are various left hand fastenerz on the stuff that i work on and i have to stop and stare at the parts before i can remember which fasteners go which way

Left hand threads, like the regulators on hydrogen cylinders, can be dis-orienting.

There is a serious safety reason for left-hand threads on Hydrogen gas cylinders! Acetylene tanks are threaded left-handed for that same reason. It's going to be interesting to see what happens if/when hydrogen is a "commonly-dispensed" fuel. It used to be that gas station attendants were competent for the task of dispensing gasoline. Hydrogen is in a completely different regime. Some of the druggies I worked with when dispensing fuel won't even be able to handle that safely.

BoT, I made a couple of items that I will post, as soon as I take some pictures.

Oh, I am aware of the reason, and support it wholeheartedly, but to me it just feels weird when I have to turn opposite to the usual. Also, H2 heats up when escaping through a small hole, unlike other gases that cool down. I've heard that it can heat up so much that it self-ignites.
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Tank

Quote from: hermes2015 on February 08, 2021, 06:30:54 AM
Quote from: Dark Lightning on February 08, 2021, 03:44:20 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on February 08, 2021, 03:04:29 AM
Quote from: billy rubin on February 07, 2021, 09:03:51 PM
that doesnt work in my life.

there are various left hand fastenerz on the stuff that i work on and i have to stop and stare at the parts before i can remember which fasteners go which way

Left hand threads, like the regulators on hydrogen cylinders, can be dis-orienting.

There is a serious safety reason for left-hand threads on Hydrogen gas cylinders! Acetylene tanks are threaded left-handed for that same reason. It's going to be interesting to see what happens if/when hydrogen is a "commonly-dispensed" fuel. It used to be that gas station attendants were competent for the task of dispensing gasoline. Hydrogen is in a completely different regime. Some of the druggies I worked with when dispensing fuel won't even be able to handle that safely.

BoT, I made a couple of items that I will post, as soon as I take some pictures.

Oh, I am aware of the reason, and support it wholeheartedly, but to me it just feels weird when I have to turn opposite to the usual. Also, H2 heats up when escaping through a small hole, unlike other gases that cool down. I've heard that it can heat up so much that it self-ignites.

Why does hydrogen heat up when escaping through a small hole?
If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
"Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt." ― Richard P. Feynman
'It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.' - Terry Pratchett
Remember, your inability to grasp science is not a valid argument against it.

hermes2015

Quote from: Tank on February 08, 2021, 08:54:14 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on February 08, 2021, 06:30:54 AM
Quote from: Dark Lightning on February 08, 2021, 03:44:20 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on February 08, 2021, 03:04:29 AM
Quote from: billy rubin on February 07, 2021, 09:03:51 PM
that doesnt work in my life.

there are various left hand fastenerz on the stuff that i work on and i have to stop and stare at the parts before i can remember which fasteners go which way

Left hand threads, like the regulators on hydrogen cylinders, can be dis-orienting.

There is a serious safety reason for left-hand threads on Hydrogen gas cylinders! Acetylene tanks are threaded left-handed for that same reason. It's going to be interesting to see what happens if/when hydrogen is a "commonly-dispensed" fuel. It used to be that gas station attendants were competent for the task of dispensing gasoline. Hydrogen is in a completely different regime. Some of the druggies I worked with when dispensing fuel won't even be able to handle that safely.

BoT, I made a couple of items that I will post, as soon as I take some pictures.

Oh, I am aware of the reason, and support it wholeheartedly, but to me it just feels weird when I have to turn opposite to the usual. Also, H2 heats up when escaping through a small hole, unlike other gases that cool down. I've heard that it can heat up so much that it self-ignites.

Why does hydrogen heat up when escaping through a small hole?

I don't know — never looked it up. Gases behave strangely. For example, the viscosity of a gas increases with temperature, unlike liquids.
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Magdalena

I have a question for those of you who like working with wood.
I bought a beautiful pipe:

Ebony wood.

And I found this:  :fingertap:
QuoteDue to the high value of this wood, many species of Ebony are now extinct, on the verge of extinction, endangered or vulnerable.

Is it really that bad? If it is, I won't buy anything else made from ebony wood.  :nu-uh:
...But it's so beautiful!
:tellmemore:

"I've had several "spiritual" or numinous experiences over the years, but never felt that they were the product of anything but the workings of my own mind in reaction to the universe." ~Recusant

Dark Lightning

Ebony has recently been moved to the CITES list due to overharvesting, as has every species(?) of rosewood. There are supplies that have been previously harvested before the ban, and one must now have a paper trail when purchasing items on the list. That's a beautiful pipe! I have some splendid sizeable pieces of black ebony that I purchased before it made it to the list. Probably enough to make a few dozen pipes like that. I use it sparingly in projects because of the expense.

https://checklist.cites.org/#/en

Icarus

Boatbuilders in the past decade or two have begun to responsibly avoid the use of Mahogany woods both from Africa and the Amazon forests. Not all of them I am sad to say.

We have raped the forests of some of the most exotic and ecologically valuable woods of the world. At least there is some recognition of the consequences for destroying those natural treasures.  Truth to tell, we have systematically removed enormous stands of less exotic woods from this earth.  Too many houses built to house too many humans. Hie thee down to the big box store to explore the lumber racks. What you see is essentially trash wood from early growth trees.

Craftsmen like DL and some of you others will shop at the big box stores with a very sharp knife.  They will use the knife to prune the ends of a board. The idea is to find a piece of lumber whose end grain reveals that it was not cut from a juvenile tree of less than a few inches of growth diameter. 


Magdalena

Quote from: Dark Lightning on February 13, 2021, 01:07:12 AM
Ebony has recently been moved to the CITES list due to overharvesting, as has every species(?) of rosewood. There are supplies that have been previously harvested before the ban, and one must now have a paper trail when purchasing items on the list. That's a beautiful pipe! I have some splendid sizeable pieces of black ebony that I purchased before it made it to the list. Probably enough to make a few dozen pipes like that. I use it sparingly in projects because of the expense.

https://checklist.cites.org/#/en

Yes, it is beautiful.
Whitlucks,
QuoteWe're a women-owned small business with a team focused on customer service...
I think that's pretty cool.  :tellmemore:

Dark Lightning, maybe you could show us your pipes?
:grin:
...Or your splendid sizeable pieces of black ebony that you purchased before it made it to the list.  ;)

"I've had several "spiritual" or numinous experiences over the years, but never felt that they were the product of anything but the workings of my own mind in reaction to the universe." ~Recusant

Magdalena

I think I just ruined the "Workshop and fixit stuff"...mood.

I'm sorry.

:sadcheer:


Let's continue to admire the pipe's beautiful black ebony.
:tellmemore:

"I've had several "spiritual" or numinous experiences over the years, but never felt that they were the product of anything but the workings of my own mind in reaction to the universe." ~Recusant

Dark Lightning

There is essentially nothing old growth in the big box stores. One CAN find some nice pieces of wood, but it'll have to be sectioned into little pieces to get anything worth making a project from. It's pretty involved, but if people are interested, I can point them to some nice websites for their viewing pleasure. Of course, it may not look like much to people who don't work with wood. If one wants to make a project out of something nice, one has to go to a "wood boutique" like Rockler or Woodcraft. If one wants to buy "curly" maple at one of those stores, Rockler charges $70+ per board foot, and Woodcraft doesn't even carry it. What's a board foot, you may ask? Well, that's a 12" by 12" by 1" piece of wood...except since it is kiln-dried, it's really only 3/4" thick. That's a lot of money for a little piece of wood. I've managed to find curly maple at a local store for 1/3 the price, which takes the sting out of a purchase. The local Home Depot does carry some maple, and I found a piece with some astonishingly nice figure that someone had cut off because they only wanted the "nice, clear grain". Similarly, I have a piece of black walnut that has some wild grain in it that I want to use for a gun stock. I bought a piece to make a cover for our doorbell, and just couldn't pass up the beautiful figure. I spent about $50 more than I needed to, to get that part of the board. $10 would have been enough for what I needed. The figure doesn't lend it to any other use. It's a gorgeous piece of wood...to the beholder, ofc.

billy rubin

we have lots of hardwoods here.

hickory, ash, red oak, white oak, tulip poplar, maple, cherry,

its the dominant wood. no big softwoods, just eastern white pine hemlocks and larches

lots of sycamore. i was wondering the other day what thw wood 2as like, whergter it was decent or just sort of weak like cottonwoods


more people have been to berlin than i have

Dark Lightning

Sycamore isn't real hard like oak. When quartersawn, it has some real nice figure.

billy rubin

is it useful for anything? as i understand it, cottonwood splits too easily to take advantage of its workability, but i don't know.

the sycamores around here are pretty big, some well over two feet thick around the lower trunk. images i can find of the grain are very good looking



more people have been to berlin than i have