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All things AI

Arturo

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2018, 02:58:46 PM »


I posted this elsewhere but this is an AI bot that's been on the web for awhile. The bot is free to use and is publically available. The bot's posts are in blue...and it's savage.
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Bad Penny II

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2018, 10:42:52 AM »
Quote
Wiki:The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human. Turing proposed that a human evaluator would judge natural language conversations between a human and a machine designed to generate human-like responses. The evaluator would be aware that one of the two partners in conversation is a machine, and all participants would be separated from one another. The conversation would be limited to a text-only channel such as a computer keyboard and screen so the result would not depend on the machine's ability to render words as speech.[2] If the evaluator cannot reliably tell the machine from the human, the machine is said to have passed the test. The test does not check the ability to give correct answers to questions, only how closely answers resemble those a human would give.

I pay homage to the most excellent Alan but I don't think much of this test.
Why bother making a human like machine when you can bypass our human foibles and make something better?
I'm glad the early aviators gave up on the flapping bird like wing and went with fixed wings, cars would be crap with legs.
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Dave

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #17 on: May 30, 2018, 11:46:31 AM »
Quote
Wiki:The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human. Turing proposed that a human evaluator would judge natural language conversations between a human and a machine designed to generate human-like responses. The evaluator would be aware that one of the two partners in conversation is a machine, and all participants would be separated from one another. The conversation would be limited to a text-only channel such as a computer keyboard and screen so the result would not depend on the machine's ability to render words as speech.[2] If the evaluator cannot reliably tell the machine from the human, the machine is said to have passed the test. The test does not check the ability to give correct answers to questions, only how closely answers resemble those a human would give.

I pay homage to the most excellent Alan but I don't think much of this test.
Why bother making a human like machine when you can bypass our human foibles and make something better?
I'm glad the early aviators gave up on the flapping bird like wing and went with fixed wings, cars would be crap with legs.

Can you further explain why you dislike the actual test, Bad Penny?
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Bad Penny II

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #18 on: May 30, 2018, 12:24:16 PM »
Quote
Wiki:The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human.

Can you further explain why you dislike the actual test, Bad Penny?

The human centric testing for intelligence.
When testing dolphins or corvids for intelligence is it about what they can do or how human they seem?
Some people focus on the destination. Some atheists focus on what's for dinner.

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Dave

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #19 on: May 30, 2018, 01:18:28 PM »
Quote
Wiki:The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human.

Can you further explain why you dislike the actual test, Bad Penny?

The human centric testing for intelligence.
When testing dolphins or corvids for intelligence is it about what they can do or how human they seem?
I think it depends on what you want an AI to do. If you want a pseudo-human, with a reasonable IQ, perhaps human centric ibtelligence is what you need. If you based the model on corvidae or delphinidae you would get a level of intelligence that is limited. If you then upped the very useful (to us) abilities then you woukd increasingly automatically create a pseu-human intelligence anywsy.

The current voice operated systems are less intelligent than but, I think, similar to dogs. They acquire a set of "tricks" that they then perform on command (sometimes). When they can watch just what you do, predict, independantly and from experience, that you need a cuppa and a biscuit after doing the gardening - and ask you, fill the kettle, switch it on, open the biscuit jar . . . The dog might bring you your slippers without asking, once trained.

It's horses for courses, mate, if you want hunanlike responses and actions you want a human like AI. If you want learned stimulus/response system, automation with a touch of nous, self learning ability, then the lesser intelligence model might suffice.

Self-drive cars are, sort of, faster mechanical guide dogs. I am wondering when the first "AI" mechanical guide dog will hit the market (if it hasn't already!)
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Bad Penny II

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #20 on: May 30, 2018, 01:43:18 PM »
Quote
Wiki:The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human.

Can you further explain why you dislike the actual test, Bad Penny?

The human centric testing for intelligence.
When testing dolphins or corvids for intelligence is it about what they can do or how human they seem?
I think it depends on what you want an AI to do. If you want a pseudo-human, with a reasonable IQ, perhaps human centric ibtelligence is what you need. If you based the model on corvidae or delphinidae you would get a level of intelligence that is limited.

I wasn't suggesting a model based on crows or flipper.
An artificial intelligence would exceed humans in ways and be deficient in others.
I don't like us using us as the unit of measure of intelligence.
I think you've sold crow and flipper a bit short too.
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Davin

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #21 on: May 30, 2018, 02:36:25 PM »
Quote
Wiki:The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human.

Can you further explain why you dislike the actual test, Bad Penny?

The human centric testing for intelligence.
When testing dolphins or corvids for intelligence is it about what they can do or how human they seem?
Then you'd like Frans de Waal's approach to testing animals for intelligence. I think it could also be applied to AI once AI becomes a little more advanced.
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Dave

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #22 on: May 30, 2018, 02:54:13 PM »
Quote
Wiki:The Turing test, developed by Alan Turing in 1950, is a test of a machine's ability to exhibit intelligent behavior equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, that of a human.

Can you further explain why you dislike the actual test, Bad Penny?

The human centric testing for intelligence.
When testing dolphins or corvids for intelligence is it about what they can do or how human they seem?
I think it depends on what you want an AI to do. If you want a pseudo-human, with a reasonable IQ, perhaps human centric ibtelligence is what you need. If you based the model on corvidae or delphinidae you would get a level of intelligence that is limited.

I wasn't suggesting a model based on crows or flipper.
An artificial intelligence would exceed humans in ways and be deficient in others.
I don't like us using us as the unit of measure of intelligence.
I think you've sold crow and flipper a bit short too.

Maybe I am short changing them a bit, but if I remember correctly most of the solutions they find to "novel" problems are based on either variations of standard behaviour or trying evey thing you can until something you want happens.

Now I am going to agree that covers a fsir lump of human behaviour as well, but I am going to suggest that analysis of the problem, and especially failed solution attempts, is more of a human trait. Hmm, though I seem to remember crows looking all round the problem before trying out solutions . . .

It annoys me when, in the videos of crows dropping blocks into water to raise the level, and the peanut, they do not include the number of hours or futile and repeated attempts. It is probably somewhere in the scholarly stuff, as might be offering the same problem to kids of various ages.
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Arturo

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #23 on: May 30, 2018, 05:01:56 PM »
I think the demonstration of Google's Duplex was more bang and flash than what we will actually get. Most of the responses are probably the same and after a short while, you will probably see the pattern in them. But as far as actually picking up the phone and talking to one while you are at work will probably be a different result.

Although it has demonstrated the ability to hear difficult accents much better than anyone else could have predicted. And I would say much better than most people I know.

So as long as you see them side by side, Duplex would, in my estimation, fail the turing test. But in practical use, would likely pass it unless someone was specifically looking for that and paying close attention.
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Dave

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #24 on: June 19, 2018, 09:39:20 AM »
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Man 1, machine 1: landmark debate between AI and humans ends in draw

It was man 1, machine 1 in the first live, public debate between an artificial intelligence system developed by IBM and two human debaters.

The AI, called Project Debater, appeared on stage in a packed conference room at IBM’s San Francisco office embodied in a 6ft tall black panel with a blue, animated “mouth”. It was a looming presence alongside the human debaters Noa Ovadia and Dan Zafrir, who stood behind a podium nearby.

Although the machine stumbled at many points, the unprecedented event offered a glimpse into how computers are learning to grapple with the messy, unstructured world of human decision-making.

https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/jun/18/artificial-intelligence-ibm-debate-project-debater

Quote from the radio, "It will take emotion out of decision making."

Robojudge is on its way, folks!
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Arturo

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2018, 01:06:49 PM »
AND THEN MAN CREATED MACHINE IN HIS OWN IMAGE
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Recusant

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Re: All things AI
« Reply #26 on: May 02, 2021, 06:20:54 AM »
This one perhaps belongs in the Brain thread, but I reckoned we shouldn't let Dave's AI thread languish.

Some interesting ideas in the piece, and bonus marks for name-checking Philip K. Dick (can almost overlook "sci-fi"). I think we'll get something like real artificial intelligence sooner or later but what the Hel do I know?

Quote for the post (with my modifications to establish context): "Consciousness is an emergent property born from the nested frequencies of synchronized spontaneous fluctuations in neuron activity levels." Deep, man.  :toke:


"Artificial intelligence research may have hit a dead end" | Salon

Quote
Philip K. Dick's iconic 1968 sci-fi novel, "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?" posed an intriguing question in its title: would an intelligent robot dream?

In the 53 years since publication, artificial intelligence research has matured significantly. And yet, despite Dick being prophetic about technology in other ways, the question posed in the title is not something AI researchers are that interested in; no one is trying to invent an android that dreams of electric sheep.

Why? Mainly, it's that most artificial intelligence researchers and scientists are busy trying to design "intelligent" software programmed to do specific tasks. There is no time for daydreaming.

Or is there? What if reason and logic are not the source of intelligence, but its product? What if the source of intelligence is more akin to dreaming and play?

Recent research into the "neuroscience of spontaneous fluctuations" points in this direction. If true, it would be a paradigm shift in our understanding of human consciousness. It would also mean that just about all artificial intelligence research is heading in the wrong direction.

[Continues . . .]

I can't subscribe to the thesis that consciousness requires a body with senses that moves through the environment. The gathering of information about the environment through sensory apparatus, yes. However it seems presumptuous to say that it must be in a single package, as it is in biological entities.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2021, 07:43:33 AM by Recusant »
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