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Dominionists in the United States

Icarus

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Re: Dominionists in the United States
« Reply #135 on: June 17, 2021, 05:09:11 AM »
More than a grain of truth in that article Rec. Scary stuff to be sure.

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Re: Dominionists in the United States
« Reply #136 on: July 11, 2021, 05:39:30 AM »
Yeah, not that it's news, but more along the lines of those scientific papers which finally put numbers to something that people in the field had previously been well aware of.

"White evangelical support for Donald Trump wasn't about partisanship -- it was about animus toward minorities" | Raw Story

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In the wake of the Pew Research Center's findings that 84 percent of the white evangelical Protestant vote went to former President Donald Trump in 2020, it is more important than ever for the American public to face the uncomfortable truth about the authoritarian Christian right's deleterious impact on society, culture and politics.

Some of us have been pushing for this conversation for years, with various iterations of relevant data and scholarship helping to elucidate key points. During the 2016 primaries, a few political scientists drew attention to a link between authoritarian personality traits and support for Trump. For Religion Dispatches, I wrote at the time, "if 'a desire for order and a fear of outsiders' predicts Trump support, the question of why white evangelicals are backing a trash-talking billionaire can be easily answered."

Although the mainstream press has only haltingly begun to take such analysis seriously, my conclusion, which was intuitive to me as someone who grew up in white evangelical subculture and attended Christian schools, aged well over the next few years, as the rubric of "Christian nationalism" became an important part of the relevant discourse. No one should have been surprised by evangelical Trump support, and that the American public has done such a poor job of grappling with the issue is a sad commentary on the fundamental weakness of American civil society.

[. . .]

Could the national discussion of right-wing, white Christians as a distinct authoritarian "faction" that transcends party help us to escape from the trap of bothsidesism? Lilliana Mason, associate professor of government and politics at the University of Maryland, seemed to suggest as much in a recent Twitter thread exploring some of the implications of a new paper she and colleagues Julie Wronski and John V. Kane recently published in American Political Science Review.

The main finding of the paper, "Activating Animus: The Uniquely Social Roots of Trump Support," is that support for the former president was driven primarily by negative feelings toward discrete social groups primarily associated with the Democratic Party: African Americans, Hispanics, Muslims, and gays and lesbians.

[Continues . . .]

"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
— H. L. Mencken


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Re: Dominionists in the United States
« Reply #137 on: July 13, 2021, 10:29:50 AM »
Oh my! The Washington Post is shocked to learn that there are Dominionists in the United States.

"‘How Theocracies Are Born’: Experts Warn of ‘Trump’s Jesus Fascists’ After Report on Christian GOP Churches" | The New Civil Rights Movement

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Experts, journalists, and chroniclers of religious extremism are sounding alarm bells over a Washington Post exposé on “a growing Christian movement that is nondenominational, openly political and has become an engine of former president Donald Trump’s Republican Party.”

As The Post explains, “It is a world in which demons are real, miracles are real, and the ultimate mission is not just transforming individual lives but also turning civilization itself into their version of God’s Kingdom: one with two genders, no abortion, a free-market economy, Bible-based education, church-based social programs and laws such as the ones curtailing LGBTQ rights now moving through statehouses around the country.”

This is not just the world they want to create for themselves, as damaging and dangerous as that might be. This is a world they want to mandate for America.

In short, one could say, an American theocracy. Or worse, something that looks a bit like a scene from Margaret Atwood’s dystopian work, The Handmaid’s Tale.

“This is the world of Trump’s spiritual adviser Paula White,” The Post explains, “and many more lesser-known but influential religious leaders who prophesied that Trump would win the election and helped organize nationwide prayer rallies in the days before the Jan. 6 insurrection, speaking of an imminent ‘heavenly strike’ and ‘a Christian populist uprising,’ leading many who stormed the Capitol to believe they were taking back the country for God.”

[Continues . . .]
"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
— H. L. Mencken