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Workshop and fixit stuff

Started by Dave, July 10, 2017, 07:26:50 PM

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Dark Lightning

Nice router and table! Have you used a router much before? One thing I'd recommend is to use a jig to hold the dice to keep your fingers away from that mincemeat maker. Is the router open for air flow at the chuck end? I made a sheet metal cover that lets it breathe but keeps dust out of the motor for my router.

Tank

Quote from: Dark Lightning on June 05, 2020, 09:22:49 PM
Nice router and table! Have you used a router much before?

No, I bought it for one specific job and its sat on the shelf until now.

Quote
One thing I'd recommend is to use a jig to hold the dice to keep your fingers away from that mincemeat maker.

Noted. I have been considering how I was going to hold the work piece!

Quote
Is the router open for air flow at the chuck end? I made a sheet metal cover that lets it breathe but keeps dust out of the motor for my router.

The sawdust flows over the table top away from the router motor. So it's out of the way.
If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
"Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt." ― Richard P. Feynman
'It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.' - Terry Pratchett
Remember, your inability to grasp science is not a valid argument against it.

Icarus

Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

Dark Lightning

Quote from: Icarus on June 19, 2020, 02:42:12 AM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

True! It only matters that the cut is made, since the router bit is round, (if that makes sense). I've used massive muscle control on some things that I've run through the router or table saw that I would have been better served by making the proper fixturing. I still have my digits, but I'll be honest and admit that some parts luckily grew back. Fingertips and edges, and fingernails, to be precise. I've used and abused my hands my whole life. Now that they are arthritic and in most cases the scars are obscured by other scars, I'm regretting it. I've also had parts being machined thrown across the room by said machine, and in the case of a piece of wood I was cutting a few months ago, kicked back into my arm with a really nice chunk of flesh flayed back. It would be nice if wood working equipment could be engineered like metal working equipment, in terms of restraint of the work piece. I'm making a wood carving that way currently, in the sense that it is restrained. It's held down with screws. Flip side of that is that I'm using chisels and a mallet, and I'd better be damned careful that none of my anatomy is in the path of those chisels, as I keep them razor-sharp. I've cut myself many times in a moment of inattention.

hermes2015

Quote from: Dark Lightning on June 19, 2020, 04:50:20 AM
Quote from: Icarus on June 19, 2020, 02:42:12 AM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

True! It only matters that the cut is made, since the router bit is round, (if that makes sense). I've used massive muscle control on some things that I've run through the router or table saw that I would have been better served by making the proper fixturing. I still have my digits, but I'll be honest and admit that some parts luckily grew back. Fingertips and edges, and fingernails, to be precise. I've used and abused my hands my whole life. Now that they are arthritic and in most cases the scars are obscured by other scars, I'm regretting it. I've also had parts being machined thrown across the room by said machine, and in the case of a piece of wood I was cutting a few months ago, kicked back into my arm with a really nice chunk of flesh flayed back. It would be nice if wood working equipment could be engineered like metal working equipment, in terms of restraint of the work piece. I'm making a wood carving that way currently, in the sense that it is restrained. It's held down with screws. Flip side of that is that I'm using chisels and a mallet, and I'd better be damned careful that none of my anatomy is in the path of those chisels, as I keep them razor-sharp. I've cut myself many times in a moment of inattention.

I've seen some YouTube chisel sharpening tips, but never tried any of them. What is your favourite sharpening technique?
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Dark Lightning

Quote from: hermes2015 on June 19, 2020, 05:17:03 AM
Quote from: Dark Lightning on June 19, 2020, 04:50:20 AM
Quote from: Icarus on June 19, 2020, 02:42:12 AM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

True! It only matters that the cut is made, since the router bit is round, (if that makes sense). I've used massive muscle control on some things that I've run through the router or table saw that I would have been better served by making the proper fixturing. I still have my digits, but I'll be honest and admit that some parts luckily grew back. Fingertips and edges, and fingernails, to be precise. I've used and abused my hands my whole life. Now that they are arthritic and in most cases the scars are obscured by other scars, I'm regretting it. I've also had parts being machined thrown across the room by said machine, and in the case of a piece of wood I was cutting a few months ago, kicked back into my arm with a really nice chunk of flesh flayed back. It would be nice if wood working equipment could be engineered like metal working equipment, in terms of restraint of the work piece. I'm making a wood carving that way currently, in the sense that it is restrained. It's held down with screws. Flip side of that is that I'm using chisels and a mallet, and I'd better be damned careful that none of my anatomy is in the path of those chisels, as I keep them razor-sharp. I've cut myself many times in a moment of inattention.

I've seen some YouTube chisel sharpening tips, but never tried any of them. What is your favourite sharpening technique?

I used to use wet-or-dry sandpaper on a sheet of glass on my bench chisels, but got lazy and bought on of these-

https://www.rockler.com/work-sharp-ws3000-tool-sharpener?sid=V91040&promo=shopping&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=&utm_campaign=PL&tid=pla&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_9TK0feN6gIVdiCtBh0NgwIREAQYAyABEgKsFPD_BwE

I bought the leather disc for honing my carving tools, but on advice about the leather having too much give, I switched to a cardboard disc. The leather can give, and the tool can end up with a rounded edge.

I can't take the machine to my carving class, so I hone them the old-fashioned way on a strop, if they need it. The leather on this is pretty hards, and the inverted "vees" work great for honing the V-tools. https://www.dickblick.com/products/flexcut-slipstrop/?clickTracking=true&wmcp=pla&wmcid=items&wmckw=34214-1001&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIyPWnsvmN6gIVNx6tBh3yZADUEAQYBCABEgJt5PD_BwE

hermes2015

Quote from: Dark Lightning on June 19, 2020, 02:11:28 PM
Quote from: hermes2015 on June 19, 2020, 05:17:03 AM
Quote from: Dark Lightning on June 19, 2020, 04:50:20 AM
Quote from: Icarus on June 19, 2020, 02:42:12 AM
Tank, make up a rip fence that you can clamp down on the table, similar to the rip fence for a table saw or band saw.  You can make smooth and accurate cuts with that fixture, difficult otherwise.

The fence for the router does not even need to be parallel to the table surface. It only needs to determine depth of cut.

True! It only matters that the cut is made, since the router bit is round, (if that makes sense). I've used massive muscle control on some things that I've run through the router or table saw that I would have been better served by making the proper fixturing. I still have my digits, but I'll be honest and admit that some parts luckily grew back. Fingertips and edges, and fingernails, to be precise. I've used and abused my hands my whole life. Now that they are arthritic and in most cases the scars are obscured by other scars, I'm regretting it. I've also had parts being machined thrown across the room by said machine, and in the case of a piece of wood I was cutting a few months ago, kicked back into my arm with a really nice chunk of flesh flayed back. It would be nice if wood working equipment could be engineered like metal working equipment, in terms of restraint of the work piece. I'm making a wood carving that way currently, in the sense that it is restrained. It's held down with screws. Flip side of that is that I'm using chisels and a mallet, and I'd better be damned careful that none of my anatomy is in the path of those chisels, as I keep them razor-sharp. I've cut myself many times in a moment of inattention.

I've seen some YouTube chisel sharpening tips, but never tried any of them. What is your favourite sharpening technique?

I used to use wet-or-dry sandpaper on a sheet of glass on my bench chisels, but got lazy and bought on of these-

https://www.rockler.com/work-sharp-ws3000-tool-sharpener?sid=V91040&promo=shopping&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=&utm_campaign=PL&tid=pla&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI_9TK0feN6gIVdiCtBh0NgwIREAQYAyABEgKsFPD_BwE

I bought the leather disc for honing my carving tools, but on advice about the leather having too much give, I switched to a cardboard disc. The leather can give, and the tool can end up with a rounded edge.

I can't take the machine to my carving class, so I hone them the old-fashioned way on a strop, if they need it. The leather on this is pretty hards, and the inverted "vees" work great for honing the V-tools. https://www.dickblick.com/products/flexcut-slipstrop/?clickTracking=true&wmcp=pla&wmcid=items&wmckw=34214-1001&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIyPWnsvmN6gIVNx6tBh3yZADUEAQYBCABEgJt5PD_BwE

Thanks!
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Recusant

It helps a lot to have a honing guide. I've used the inexpensive Eclipse style for a long time, but there are much nicer ones.
"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
— H. L. Mencken


Dark Lightning

Quote from: Recusant on June 19, 2020, 03:34:51 PM
It helps a lot to have a honing guide. I've used the inexpensive Eclipse style for a long time, but there are much nicer ones.

I have one of those, but a different brand. I used it on my bench chisels until I got lazy and bought the Work Sharp 3000.  ;D I have 103 (Holy Moley!) carving chisels (I just went and counted) and 18 carving knives. I don't have to sharpen them all at the same time, but the machine makes it a lot quicker, and it's easier to control the chisels if they have a curved profile.

Icarus

My recently built sharpening tool is a marvel of accuracy and ability to make old blades new again.  The square block has several grits of wet-or-dry sandpaper.  The finest one on this block is 2000 grit.  A faster abrasive; diamond plates, can be used on the block also.

I did not dream this tool up as a result of my singular brilliance. There are several iterations of the basic concept on You Tube.

Icarus


Tank

#581
[quote author=Icarus link=topic=15190.msg403185#msg403185 date=1592610805]
[img]http://P10200823.jpg[/img]
[/quote]


That's not going to work as 'HTTP://' says this is on the internet and 'P10200823.jpg' says this is a file (an image).

You're missing a crucial bit that fits between the two that says where on the internet the file can be found.

For example
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3345/JNid6i.jpg

This is the link to, or URL (Uniform Resource Locator) which tells your browser where to go to get the file so: On the Internet, here, this file.

As the file is an image you have to tell your browser what to do with the file so here you add 'tags', which are instructions, in this case: [IMG]URL[/IMG]

Thus this: [img]https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/3345/JNid6i.jpg[/img]

Will do this:
If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
"Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt." ― Richard P. Feynman
'It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.' - Terry Pratchett
Remember, your inability to grasp science is not a valid argument against it.

billy rubin

Quote from: Icarus on June 20, 2020, 12:30:15 AM
My recently built sharpening tool is a marvel of accuracy and ability to make old blades new again.  The square block has several grits of wet-or-dry sandpaper.  The finest one on this block is 2000 grit.  A faster abrasive; diamond plates, can be used on the block also.

I did not dream this tool up as a result of my singular brilliance. There are several iterations of the basic concept on You Tube.

pitchers!

im always disatisfied with sharpening things


more people have been to berlin than i have

Tank


I made a cover to stop the veneer splitting


It worked perfectly. I made the 6 a hexagon to keep the holes as far apart as possible. It also made the dice a bit unusual.




I then used the guided router bit as Hermes suggested





I'd already made a back stop for the router. Very basic but functional.


Rebates perfectly :)


My son sent the perfect fathers day card :D


If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
"Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt." ― Richard P. Feynman
'It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.' - Terry Pratchett
Remember, your inability to grasp science is not a valid argument against it.

xSilverPhinx

I am what survives if it's slain - Zack Hemsey