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Workshop and fixit stuff

Started by Dave, July 10, 2017, 07:26:50 PM

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hermes2015

Quote from: Dave on May 18, 2018, 05:33:48 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 05:17:57 AM
Quote from: jumbojak on May 18, 2018, 02:52:55 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Dave

Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 06:11:47 AM
Quote from: Dave on May 18, 2018, 05:33:48 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 05:17:57 AM
Quote from: jumbojak on May 18, 2018, 02:52:55 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.

Yeah, 'cos along came the "Awful Eightiies" followed the "Nasty Nineties", the "Naff Noughties" and now the "Terrible Teenies"

Sorry, wrong thread!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74

Magdalena

Quote from: Dave on May 18, 2018, 06:46:51 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 06:11:47 AM
Quote from: Dave on May 18, 2018, 05:33:48 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 05:17:57 AM
Quote from: jumbojak on May 18, 2018, 02:52:55 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.

Yeah, 'cos along came the "Awful Eightiies" followed the "Nasty Nineties", the "Naff Noughties" and now the "Terrible Teenies"

Sorry, wrong thread!

:notsure:
Yeah...I think you're looking for the, "GOOF" Member's Club  - "Grumpy Order of Old Farts". They're in the Reasons To Be Grumpy thread. I believe today is their first meeting.
:grin:

"I've had several "spiritual" or numinous experiences over the years, but never felt that they were the product of anything but the workings of my own mind in reaction to the universe." ~Recusant

Dave

Quote from: Magdalena on May 18, 2018, 07:26:02 AMkj
Quote from: Dave on May 18, 2018, 06:46:51 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 06:11:47 AM
Quote from: Dave on May 18, 2018, 05:33:48 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 05:17:57 AM
Quote from: jumbojak on May 18, 2018, 02:52:55 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.

Yeah, 'cos along came the "Awful Eightiies" followed the "Nasty Nineties", the "Naff Noughties" and now the "Terrible Teenies"

Sorry, wrong thread!

:notsure:
Yeah...I think you're looking for the, "GOOF" Member's Club  - "Grumpy Order of Old Farts". They're in the Reasons To Be Grumpy thread. I believe today is their first meeting.
:grin:

"Any collection, meeting, assembly or congregation of GOOF members shall be known as a Grump."
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74

Arturo

Quote from: Magdalena on May 18, 2018, 07:26:02 AM
Quote from: Dave on May 18, 2018, 06:46:51 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 06:11:47 AM
Quote from: Dave on May 18, 2018, 05:33:48 AM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 05:17:57 AM
Quote from: jumbojak on May 18, 2018, 02:52:55 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Ahhh, Zen and motorcycles - I remember them well . . . We were still trying to hang on to the tatters of The Swinging Sixties after The Austere Fifties.

We're nostalgic old fools, Dave.

Yeah, 'cos along came the "Awful Eightiies" followed the "Nasty Nineties", the "Naff Noughties" and now the "Terrible Teenies"

Sorry, wrong thread!

:notsure:
Yeah...I think you're looking for the, "GOOF" Member's Club  - "Grumpy Order of Old Farts". They're in the Reasons To Be Grumpy thread. I believe today is their first meeting.
:grin:

I noticed you weren't in there Mags. Interesting... :)

It's Okay To Say You're Welcome
     Just let people be themselves.
     Arturo The1  リ壱

jumbojak

Quote from: hermes2015 on May 18, 2018, 05:17:57 AM
Quote from: jumbojak on May 18, 2018, 02:52:55 AM
Well yesterday started well enough. Front brakes for the Titan went on without a hitch. Went and looked at a few tractors, picked up some shop supplies, and had the opportunity to irritate the local Ford fanatic - I told him I was set to buy a new F150 but Ford stopped making them.

Then everything went to shit. We were all set to test the oil pressure in the big truck. Had the tester kit. Had the truck. Picked out the right adapter fitting. And we could not get that damn fitting into the hole. We fought for hours only to find out the fitting was the wrong size. Then the sending unit broke going back in. Then it rained... I was a grumpy bastards last night.

I always like reading your interesting posts. They somehow remind me of Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig, a book you should enjoy if you haven't read it.

Tonight I get to suffer installing the new sending unit. In. The. Rain.

We HAVE to get power at the shop!

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub

"I'd be incensed by your impudence were I not so impressed by your memory." - Siz

Dave

This is probably an old one - but new to me when I "invented" it this morning.

Needed to get a piece of 25 x 35 x 3mm thick steel clamped pretty flush with the top of my drill vice jaws for marking and drilling. Discovered best way was to put the piece on a flat clean surface, put the opened vice over it upside-down, then tighten. Within normal workshop limits, including the slightly scratched vice jaws, it worked well. Marked, drilled and tapped.

Then I gave up for the day 'cos the attic had hit about 35 in the sun!

All this for a bodge to save someone a mere £150 for a new oven door! OK, she has just been sacked . . .
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74

hermes2015

Quote from: Dave on May 20, 2018, 02:27:01 PM
This is probably an old one - but new to me when I "invented" it this morning.

Needed to get a piece of 25 x 35 x 3mm thick steel clamped pretty flush with the top of my drill vice jaws for marking and drilling. Discovered best way was to put the piece on a flat clean surface, put the opened vice over it upside-down, then tighten. Within normal workshop limits, including the slightly scratched vice jaws, it worked well. Marked, drilled and tapped.

Then I gave up for the day 'cos the attic had hit about 35 in the sun!

All this for a bodge to save someone a mere £150 for a new oven door! OK, she has just been sacked . . .

Pardon my high density, but I didn't get that description. It sounds interesting, so I would appreciate a bit more explanation.  :query:
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Dave

Quote from: hermes2015 on May 20, 2018, 02:52:37 PM
Quote from: Dave on May 20, 2018, 02:27:01 PM
This is probably an old one - but new to me when I "invented" it this morning.

Needed to get a piece of 25 x 35 x 3mm thick steel clamped pretty flush with the top of my drill vice jaws for marking and drilling. Discovered best way was to put the piece on a flat clean surface, put the opened vice over it upside-down, then tighten. Within normal workshop limits, including the slightly scratched vice jaws, it worked well. Marked, drilled and tapped.

Then I gave up for the day 'cos the attic had hit about 35 in the sun!

All this for a bodge to save someone a mere £150 for a new oven door! OK, she has just been sacked . . .

Pardon my high density, but I didn't get that description. It sounds interesting, so I would appreciate a bit more explanation.  :query:

Um, well, er, can be fiddly trying to get a piece of material into a drill vice with the top surface dead flush with the top of the vice jaws for marking etc. Inverting the vice on a flat surface over the piece means that the vice and piece surfaces in contact with the fkat surface are, er, all at the same kevel. Sort of.

Thinking afterwards I used to do something similar by  just "nipping" the work piece slightly proud in the vice, placing something flat on it the tappint it down.  But, sometimes, the "nip" is not perfect and the piece shifts. With today's method I could tighten right up straight away.

If you want the surface of the piece slightly proud, for filing or even milling, say, without danger to the vice, you put suitably thick spacers under the vice jaw tops only. Then, when you lift the vice right side up the piece is ready for working on.

I was using my "precision" drill vice and try to preserve the surfaces on that - can't take it to work for a light skim on a mill any more, I trued up all the sides before leaving work. How I miss access to a proper machine shop!

Is there a way to get our own short videos up here without involving Youtube!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74

hermes2015

Quote from: Dave on May 20, 2018, 03:12:20 PM
Quote from: hermes2015 on May 20, 2018, 02:52:37 PM
Quote from: Dave on May 20, 2018, 02:27:01 PM
This is probably an old one - but new to me when I "invented" it this morning.

Needed to get a piece of 25 x 35 x 3mm thick steel clamped pretty flush with the top of my drill vice jaws for marking and drilling. Discovered best way was to put the piece on a flat clean surface, put the opened vice over it upside-down, then tighten. Within normal workshop limits, including the slightly scratched vice jaws, it worked well. Marked, drilled and tapped.

Then I gave up for the day 'cos the attic had hit about 35 in the sun!

All this for a bodge to save someone a mere £150 for a new oven door! OK, she has just been sacked . . .

Pardon my high density, but I didn't get that description. It sounds interesting, so I would appreciate a bit more explanation.  :query:

Um, well, er, can be fiddly trying to get a piece of material into a drill vice with the top surface dead flush with the top of the vice jaws for marking etc. Inverting the vice on a flat surface over the piece means that the vice and piece surfaces in contact with the fkat surface are, er, all at the same kevel. Sort of.

Thinking afterwards I used to do something similar by  just "nipping" the work piece slightly proud in the vice, placing something flat on it the tappint it down.  But, sometimes, the "nip" is not perfect and the piece shifts. With today's method I could tighten right up straight away.

If you want the surface of the piece slightly proud, for filing or even milling, say, without danger to the vice, you put suitably thick spacers under the vice jaw tops only. Then, when you lift the vice right side up the piece is ready for working on.

I was using my "precision" drill vice and try to preserve the surfaces on that - can't take it to work for a light skim on a mill any more, I trued up all the sides before leaving work. How I miss access to a proper machine shop!

Is there a way to get our own short videos up here without involving Youtube!

Thanks Dave, now I get it. Yes, it would be useful if we could post videos without Youtube. I once tried with Imgur, but failed.
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

jumbojak

Why did you need to do the layout in the vise? I would've marked and center punched, then drilled and tapped at my convenience. Cheap twist drills make for decent round parallels if you snap the fluted portion off.

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub

"I'd be incensed by your impudence were I not so impressed by your memory." - Siz

Dave

Quote from: jumbojak on May 20, 2018, 04:10:15 PM
Why did you need to do the layout in the vise? I would've marked and center punched, then drilled and tapped at my convenience. Cheap twist drills make for decent round parallels if you snap the fluted portion off.
Ah, well, I am a bit fumbly in my dotage and like to have things as steady as possible. Wanted 4 holes in that little bit, fairly precisely. Find holding a 6" rule steady on a shiny/slippery little bit of steel whilst scribing not so easy these days. OK, I had to take it out for centre punching then put it back in. I have been known to clamp a rule down then use a jeweller's loupe, with a very fine centre punch and small hammer, to get best precision! Follow up with the big punch later. On silver eork I would, if possible, glue the workpiece to something for marking up. Had to be a soluble glue, in some sirt of solvent, of course . . . Reduced the chance of a slip and a scratch.

Yes, have often used drills shanks for spacers, though the shank is not always precisely the same size as the actual stated cutting size (a 3mm rod is a very tight fit in a 3mm hole, goes in with a big enough hammer behind it and maybe a torch to warm up the outside!) but I am not working to microns as I did at work, half a millimeter is usually close enough for my current definition of high precision!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74

jumbojak

There's a big honking hole in the condenser return line for my car's ac system. I have some epoxy setting up, just so I can charge the system enough to test the compressor. If the compressor turns in I'll be in fairly good shape once I get a vacuum pump to finish the job properly.

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub

"I'd be incensed by your impudence were I not so impressed by your memory." - Siz

Tank

Quote from: jumbojak on May 23, 2018, 03:50:55 AM
There's a big honking hole in the condenser return line for my car's ac system. I have some epoxy setting up, just so I can charge the system enough to test the compressor. If the compressor turns in I'll be in fairly good shape once I get a vacuum pump to finish the job properly.
At least you found the problem.
If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
"Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt." ― Richard P. Feynman
'It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.' - Terry Pratchett
Remember, your inability to grasp science is not a valid argument against it.

Dave

Quote from: Tank on May 23, 2018, 06:23:58 AM
Quote from: jumbojak on May 23, 2018, 03:50:55 AM
There's a big honking hole in the condenser return line for my car's ac system. I have some epoxy setting up, just so I can charge the system enough to test the compressor. If the compressor turns in I'll be in fairly good shape once I get a vacuum pump to finish the job properly.
At least you found the problem.

I am so glad that the ac in my shopping trolley is of the Peltier type, no fluids or gases!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74