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What are you listening to?

Started by gwyn428, January 25, 2009, 09:30:27 PM

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hermes2015

"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Papasito Bruno

"Most people would rather be boring than be bored." <br />― Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Magdalena


This one is perfect for a Wednesday morning.

:dancinggirl:

:tellmemore:

"I've had several "spiritual" or numinous experiences over the years, but never felt that they were the product of anything but the workings of my own mind in reaction to the universe." ~Recusant

hermes2015

"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

hermes2015

"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Papasito Bruno

I was listening to CBC Radio out of Windsor, Ontario yesterday on the way home from the office. I love this station as they actually talk about the music they play, and not just in a generic way, but about the actual songs, and the lyrics, and the music and recordings behind them....not just about who the composer is currently dating, etc...

Anyway I heard the following story about one of my favorites songs, "Killing Me Softly."

This song first came to prominence in 1973 when Roberta Flack released her cover of the song (For which she won a Grammy and Best Performance Award) , and then again in 1996 when the Fugees released their awesome version with Lauryn Hill on vocals (One of my all time favorites)

What I didn't know is that the song was composed by Charles Fox with the lyrics written by Norman Gimbel in collaboration with Lori Liebermann. Lori was inspired to write the lyrics after she saw Don McLean perform live in 1971.
Lori recorded, and released the song in 1972, but the original version did not chart.
A year later Roberta Flack was on an American Airlines flight when she happen to choose the song to listen to while onboard as she was intrigued by the title of the song. She loved the melody and lyrics so much that she decided to perform it herself while on tour with Marvin Gaye. After Marvin heard her perform it he immediately advised her to not sing the song live again until she herself recorded it,...in fact he told her to get it recorded and released as soon as possible as he was sure her version was going to be a hit (Marvin later said it was one of his favorite songs)

Roberta release her cover and the rest is history. Below are all three versions, and I have to say I loved Roberta's cover of the song when I was a kid (I was about 8 when it came out). Her 45 with this song on it was the first vinyl record by a woman I think I ever bought (I think it was the 3rd or 4th record I'd bought)

That said, the I adore the Fugees version of this song even more than Robertas,...sorry Roberta. :'(

Enjoy.
Lori


Roberta


Fugees (Lauryn)
"Most people would rather be boring than be bored." <br />― Mokokoma Mokhonoana

Magdalena


"I've had several "spiritual" or numinous experiences over the years, but never felt that they were the product of anything but the workings of my own mind in reaction to the universe." ~Recusant

TheFightSong

Quote from: Papasito Bruno on February 11, 2022, 06:56:33 PM
I was listening to CBC Radio out of Windsor, Ontario yesterday on the way home from the office. I love this station as they actually talk about the music they play, and not just in a generic way, but about the actual songs, and the lyrics, and the music and recordings behind them....not just about who the composer is currently dating, etc...

Anyway I heard the following story about one of my favorites songs, "Killing Me Softly."

This song first came to prominence in 1973 when Roberta Flack released her cover of the song (For which she won a Grammy and Best Performance Award) , and then again in 1996 when the Fugees released their awesome version with Lauryn Hill on vocals (One of my all time favorites)

What I didn't know is that the song was composed by Charles Fox with the lyrics written by Norman Gimbel in collaboration with Lori Liebermann. Lori was inspired to write the lyrics after she saw Don McLean perform live in 1971.
Lori recorded, and released the song in 1972, but the original version did not chart.
A year later Roberta Flack was on an American Airlines flight when she happen to choose the song to listen to while onboard as she was intrigued by the title of the song. She loved the melody and lyrics so much that she decided to perform it herself while on tour with Marvin Gaye. After Marvin heard her perform it he immediately advised her to not sing the song live again until she herself recorded it,...in fact he told her to get it recorded and released as soon as possible as he was sure her version was going to be a hit (Marvin later said it was one of his favorite songs)

Roberta release her cover and the rest is history. Below are all three versions, and I have to say I loved Roberta's cover of the song when I was a kid (I was about 8 when it came out). Her 45 with this song on it was the first vinyl record by a woman I think I ever bought (I think it was the 3rd or 4th record I'd bought)

That said, the I adore the Fugees version of this song even more than Robertas,...sorry Roberta. :'(

Enjoy.
Lori


Roberta


Fugees (Lauryn)

Lauryn Hill makes the song "Killing Me Softly" more simple and with a lower pitch than Roberta's theatrical version. I find Lauryn Hill added more soul to it. Honestly, I find Lauryn Hill's version of that song to be more emotional, less theatrical, and hypnotic. I find Lauryn's voice to be sexy when her voice has a low pitch in this song.

billy rubin



more people have been to berlin than i have

hermes2015

Mahler was a complex character. For me it has been a worthwhile journey through his music, from his symphonies in my student years to the song cycles in my old age.
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

No one


hermes2015

Two very different pieces by John Cage.

First Construction (in Metal)



4'33"
"Who is to say that pleasure is useless?"
― Charles Eames

Mr. B

"I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" - Evelyn Beatrice Hall

Mr. B

"I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" - Evelyn Beatrice Hall

Bad Penny II

Take my advice, don't listen to me.