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Petrol head thread!!!

Started by billy rubin, October 29, 2019, 10:41:33 PM

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billy rubin

Quote from: Icarus on June 17, 2022, 03:42:14 AMOxygenated fuel has the potential for destroying your engine.  The deal goes like this......you need enough oxygen in the fuel mixture to affect a rapid and complete burn.More oxy will burn more fuel and prduce a hotter piston charge.  Stoichiometric ratios for fuel air is at about 14.7 pounds of atmospheric air to one pound of gasoline. That will give you enough oxygen content in the air to burn the fuel completely. 

We can carburate or inject any amount of fuel that we desire.  We cannot inject more atmospheric air than the inlet system is capable of passing through the inlet passages and past the inlet valves. So it is tempting to mess with the fuel chemistry in order to get more oxygen into the combustion chamber. .............I warn you that excess oxy in the charge mixture will cook your engine in a New York Instant.   Billy, you have been around long enough to know what happens when you lean down the mixture in a two stroke engine. So beware of trick fuels. The idea is right, inject more oxygen, but the possible outcome as in a wasted engine, is to be carefully assessed.   

yo youre right about the  lean burn thing. ive been talking to the fuel people. they recommend jetting up 3 to 5 percent, so ive ordered 3 pairs of main jets up from tbe 3 higher i already have.

so i can jet richer 6 sizes to start with. but im ordering 3 more to have 9. on tbe airstrip ill start rich and just work my way down.

no idea what to do with the timing. theres a guy up by my fuel supplier who tunes with this stuff and ill be talking to him.

i have never run oxygenated fuel so i dont know what to expect. sure hope i dont blow it up


more people have been to berlin than i have

billy rubin

Quote from: Anne D. on June 18, 2022, 08:25:58 AMLooking for advice and guidance from folks much more knowledgeable than I am.

Though my dad was a mechanic (and seemed to think his knowledge would somehow pass down to his daughters through osmosis), I am not at all all a petrol head. But I do dearly love my 2003 subaru impreza wrx. She has been much better to me than I've been to her. She is still running fairly strong, though I've had to put, on avg., about 800 US dollars into her yearly for the last maybe 8 years. But she's showing her age, and various small things keep going wrong that I'm not willing to put in $ for to fix (e.g., keyless entry hasn't  worked for years--not a battery issue; lock to the hatchback trunk is broken so I just don't ever keep valuables in the car; AC seems to go out every summer; disturbing noises from under the car lately that I've been ignoring as work has been busy). I think about getting a "new" subaru, but have a visceral dislike of computerized cars, so if I were  to get a "new" car, I'd want a subaru from before the computers went in. I know "computerized" means a variety of things, but I'm meaning to convey when the dash panel became like a computer desktop. And I'd want a manual transmission. But when I price these, they're 22K and up US dollars. I could take on a car note, somewhat comfortably, but am trying to weigh whether it's worth it. If you were me, would you just keep on trucking with the 2003 car or get a, say, 2015 or 2016 model, or do something else? I know this is very subjective, but would appreciate others' thoughts. Thanks in advance.

good question, anne

i used to drive stuff that was at least 30 years old but the machines i liked is all either junked or off the roads now

american cars have had their engines controlled by internal computers since about 1981 (for GM) .

my newest vehicle is a 2007 pickup. what do you not like about the dashboard interface?


more people have been to berlin than i have

Anne D.

Quote from: billy rubin on June 18, 2022, 04:03:33 PMwhat do you not like about the dashboard interface?

It's more of what I (quite possibly wrongly) think the computery-looking dashboard interface means. To me it indicates that the functions of the car are so computer controlled that I probably won't be able to take it to my neighborhood mechanic to fix if something goes wrong but instead will have to take it to the dealer in the burbs to hook up to their computer diagnostic thing. And I have a (possibly misguided) deep-seated distrust of dealers that was instilled in me by my dad.

My sister got a brand new car a year ago, and five months in it stalled out on the highway. Had to be towed to the dealer, and the dealer determined there was nothing mechanically wrong with the car, but a digital sensor went haywire and communicated that something was wrong, which caused the car's system to automatically stop the car. $700 to fix a car that nothing was mechanically wrong with (warranty covered it, but still).

(Less importantly, there's also an aesthetics thing for me with a car dash that looks like a computer screen. As convenient as it makes everything, it just doesn't look like a car to me.  :D  )

Icarus

Anne you are in good company when you are concerned about all the computerized gadgetry on modern automobiles.

The upside of the Engine control module (ECU) which is a computer of sorts,is that it is far more efficient than the predecessor engines could hope for. The downside is that some of the service routines are only available at the Dealership.

Dealership!!!!!  They are criminals who will rape your bank account.. They live by the Upsell motive. If all you need is a new battery they will do their damnedest to sell you a wheel alignment job that you probably do not need.   My local Toyota dealer and my Honda dealer has a shop rate of $127.50 per shop hour. So do most of the other dealers I suspect.

You can take your Subaru to many of the auto parts sellers, Auto Zone for example, They will plug in their code reader gadget to learn what your car would like repaired. That is a free service. Their interest is to sell you the parts that might be needed for whatever  repair or replacement is indicated. Meanwhile the Toyota, Honda, and other dealers charge something like $85 to do the analysis that the auto parts store does for free. 

There are some repairs that can be done only by the dealer because they have access to parts that the parts stores do not have. The independent mechanic does not have the tools or computerized programming to fix some of the problems. Example.  Wifes 2010 Toyota Prius had some brake problems. Turns out that the Toyota needed a new "Bake Booster module".  Wouldn't you know it? The warranty on that particular part had expired only a few months ago. Our cost $2400 to make the damned car drivable.   The "service advisor" at the dealership also urged us to have the air filter in the battery compartment renewed.  That is a bullshit deal that would have cost $240.  The main battery does not need a new filter.  What the hell, that car has only 62,000 miles on it.

If you could buy a 1939 Ford or a 1941 Chevrolet, your local mechanic could fix it in a few minutes. Those cars were not very efficient so time marches on and we now have computerized machines that are so complex and involved  that am ordinary independent  mechanic is squeezed out of consideration for many repair processes.

None of that rant will be of use to you I suspect.  If you can manage the cost of a newer Subaru, I say go for it. Buying an older, non computerized car will only get you an antique that might need a lot of TLC. You might consider a new Kia or Hyundai.  The warranties are very good and they are both decent machines.  But they are computerized, so get used to that reality.

You can ignore the back up camera, the lane change monitor, the headlight sensor, the GPS facility, the heated or air conditioned seats, the rear seat video screen and all the rest of those luxuriant features.  You will have to pay for them whether they please you or not.

Right now, one of the major considerations is fuel economy, what with five dollar per gallon gasoline. Keep that in mind not only for the personal cost factor but also for the green factor.  That feature might influence your decision for a replacement vehicle.  Moped maybe?

With all that palaver, I suggest that your old Subaru might be a keeper. Especially so if you live in a snowy,icy, part of the country.       

Dark Lightning

In 2016 I bought a Kia Forte, new. It does not have a back up camera or a touch screen; those are optional. I has about everything else, though. I bought the extended warranty (10 years, 100k miles) because of the ridiculous cost of the components if they break. So far, so good. Had my son bought a vehicle of his own sooner, I'd still be driving my '05 Corolla. I have a '70 Chevy truck that is used primarily for towing our travel trailer. It's been driven about 5k miles in the last 6 years. The wife and I went to an old-vehicle meet-up in it, and it started running rough on the way back home. Fortunately, I was a mechanic back in the days when this truck was newer, and I'll be troubleshooting and making the fix today. There is very little that I would attempt on my Forte, though I have replaced the battery on my own. It's 6 years old, and has 20k miles on it. Once it passes out of warranty, if something breaks, it'll get donated. I'm considering getting another old vehicle that I can work on that gets better mileage. I don't drive that much, obviously, so gasoline prices aren't much of a consideration.

Anne D.

Thank you, Billy, DL, and Icarus, for the advice and food for thought. Icarus, that's especially helpful to know about the auto part stores, that they can figure out the part needed. And I appreciate the info about Kias or Hyundais being decent options. My sister had a Santa Fe for several years, and as I recall it treated her well. I think I'm leaning toward just taking the plunge and getting a mid-teens "new" subaru; still not sure what I'd do with the current car then. Anyway, thanks again. : )

billy rubin

i have a scan tool of my own. cost $25 and lets me pull the codes myself.

but i still prefer the old stuff. im comfortable with that level of technology. but i dont do as much anymore. my pickup is in the shop for ball joints and an alignment.

$900 he says.

i havent done ball joints in years. or a clutch even.



more people have been to berlin than i have

Dark Lightning

I was driving my '70 3/4 ton truck home a few years ago, and the brakes failed. I was able to drive it home on the park brake, using lots of following distance. I ordered a disc brake conversion kit and installed that system. Some of the fasteners are set to 260 Ft-Lbs of torque from the factory, and given their age, were pretty much seized. My 300 pound son stood on some of the parts while I used a 3 foot cheater bar. Good times! Got it done, though.

billy rubin

i live in the rust belt, and gigantic torques are often necessary to unscrew things.

the 1965 pontiac starchief i bought from my aunt (48,000 miles after 30 years) still had the paper stickers onthe original shocks underneath.

not something that wwould live in ohio in salt country. we drove the shit out of that car, wore it out (10.5 to 1 compression) and rebuilt it. then wore it out again. it would do the ton in a heartbeat, even with a two-barrel carburetor.

sold my 1950 hudson before we left california. i miss that car.

these days i refuse to be emotionally  involved in automobiles anymore. i buy them like i buy a washing machine, more frequently actually. no attachment, no concern. when they die i line up at the end in the hay field. someday someone will say, look, what a trove of antiques . . .

but in reality they will all be wrecks that i drove there, parked, and walked away from./


more people have been to berlin than i have

Dark Lightning

What does, "it would do the ton in a heartbeat, even with a two-barrel carburetor" mean?

billy rubin

#310
it had a 290 horsepower 390 V8, with a two barrel rochester. a heavy vehicle

the high compression meant it would easily go 100 mph.

ton is old british slang for 100mph. thought it was more generaliy used



more people have been to berlin than i have

billy rubin



more people have been to berlin than i have

Asmodean

Quote from: Icarus on June 19, 2022, 06:09:45 AMThe upside of the Engine control module (ECU) which is a computer of sorts,is that it is far more efficient than the predecessor engines could hope for. The downside is that some of the service routines are only available at the Dealership.
In my neck of the proverbial woods, I actually haven't had to take The Deutschmann to Opel for any ECU-related maintenance. My no-brand next door shop has thus far been able to do pretty much everything.

That can of course be an artefact of local legislation or even of how Opel does business over here.

QuoteDealership!!!!!  They are criminals who will rape your bank account..
No shit. 3000USD for a turbo. Got it for 1600 at the abovementioned no-brand.
Quote from: Ecurb Noselrub on July 25, 2013, 08:18:52 PM
In Asmo's grey lump,
wrath and dark clouds gather force.
Luxembourg trembles.

billy rubin

my eife lost the electronic key to her chrysler.

UD$537 for two new keys.

apologies if ive mentioned this before. it still incenses me


more people have been to berlin than i have

Asmodean

I paid around 300 for a new key - the old one was worn out. That was at Opel though. Pretty pricey.
Quote from: Ecurb Noselrub on July 25, 2013, 08:18:52 PM
In Asmo's grey lump,
wrath and dark clouds gather force.
Luxembourg trembles.