Author Topic: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective  (Read 558 times)

Asmodean

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Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« on: October 06, 2018, 11:41:54 AM »
So it's been over a year since I got rid of my life-long companions - glasses, and I thought I'd share my experiences.

I got what's called EVO Visian ICL, or "lens implant," which means that the eye surgeon implanted an artificial "contact lens" into my eye, between my natural lens and the iris. (illustration below) I know that for some people, they recommend changing the natural lens for an artificial one. I have no experience with that route, and am therefore unable to say anything worthwhile about it.



The operation itself took less then 30 minutes for each eye. I think from when I got into the chair, and until I got out again, it took 45 minutes. I got some Valium before the operation, as well as some numbing eye drops both before and during the procedure. Still, I was as awake and alert as a person on Valium could expect to be, playing "I don't care any more" in my mind, but I have to say that the procedure itself was quite an unpleasant sensation, as while it did not hurt, per se, I could still feel the doctor poking sharp objects inside my eye. Creepy as old fuck, but perfectly survivable. The place I was at, did not use those super-creepy metal contraptions to hold the eye open. In stead, they used this kind of... Glue pillow, I suppose, although I am uncertain as to the exact technology of it, what with being high as a kite at the appropriate time for observation. I think that aside from the poking and prodding in order to properly align the new lens, the most unpleasant experience was looking constantly into a very bright light. Still, one does get used to it to a degree.

Once they finished with my right eye, the effects were immediate. The world was as sharp as when you get a brand new pair of glasses. I think any-one with poor vision can probably attest to the exact sensation I was experiencing. They covered my right side with a blue cloth, in order to move to the other, and I could see both the weave and the individual fibers of it. I was dwelling so much on my newfound sharp-sightedness, that I even managed to effectively ignore most of the discomfort associated with doing the same thing on my other eye.

After the operation, I was sat in a darkened room, given a vast supply of coffee and candy and left to sober up and come back to my senses, with a nurse checking in every ten minutes or so, to see if all was well.

The first hour after I left the clinic, I was extremely photophobic (all the lights were too sharp) and my sun glasses helped little, because they polarized light in such a way that even though they alleviated my photophobia, they also effectively rendered me blind as a mole. Still, my recovery was surprisingly speedy, with the only lingering side effect in lens flares I see when looking directly at a point-source of light. Those are caused by a tiny hole in the middle of the lens, what regulates the fluid pressure in front of and behind the implant by letting the fluid pass freely.

Since, I have been going for periodic check-ups, a ton at the start and yearly since, to see if all was still well. One benefit of the ICL is that if they fail to correct the vision to a desired degree this way, the option of for example laser surgery is still open. My result was that with both eyes combined, I have a 100% vision, although they compensate a little bit for each other. I no longer need glasses to work, read or drive - for anything, in fact, and it's... Beautiful.

There are some potential side effects down the line, but from what I understand, nothing that can't be corrected, and my doctor does not expect that I will suffer any.

Do the benefits out-weigh the potential risks and the cost? Well, I've had poor vision since I was a kid, and at times, I still marvel at how sharply I see the world now. The op cost around 6000USD by today's exchange rate, and to me, it was worth every penny and every potential risk taken. Ten out of ten.

So, this was my little success story, from a satisfied patient's perspective. If you are considering doing something like this, feel free to ask me for deeper specifics. If I can answer you, I will.
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Dark Lightning

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2018, 02:25:20 PM »
That's a pretty neat tech! I'll stick with specs, though. I'm a Luddite, that way.

Tom62

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2018, 03:29:17 PM »
That's a pretty neat tech! I'll stick with specs, though. I'm a Luddite, that way.


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Asmodean

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2018, 03:51:59 PM »
I get it. Me, however..? Totally a cyborg! :D
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Sherman Firefly

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #4 on: October 07, 2018, 08:27:26 AM »
Very interesting report. I have artificial fixed focus lenses so glasses are a not optional.
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Asmodean

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #5 on: October 07, 2018, 08:42:44 AM »
I see!

Fixed focus, that’s basically a hard lens? The muscles are unable to vary its shape? Am I onto something?
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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2018, 04:01:46 PM »
I see!

Fixed focus, that’s basically a hard lens? The muscles are unable to vary its shape? Am I onto something?
Correct. I got cataracts in both lenses and they had to be replaced.
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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #7 on: October 08, 2018, 12:22:39 AM »
I had a similar experience that involved some of the details that the Asmo describes.  Mine was for a routine cataract surgery in my left eye.  Later laser treatment was not unpleasant except for the sharp cracking sounds in my head when the laser was so repeatedly discharged..  I had previously had un-admitted difficulties while driving at night. After the surgery, Huzza!  I can see where I am going and have the ability to see  the dump truck (lorry for you Brits) that I was previously about to hit.

My opthalmologist surgean was a comedian who kept me in laughter all the while.  He asked me what I wanted from my eyes. I said that I would like 21 year old eyes.  He said that he had a wish for a 21 year old pecker.

That man was a graduate physicist with a masters degree.  He came to his senses and continued his education to become an ophomologist.......... where the money is. I say this to agree with the Asmos cost of $6K US which is not merely chopped liver, to be sure.

Good on the wizards who can make it possible for us to see again.

Asmodean

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #8 on: October 08, 2018, 09:45:26 AM »
Correct. I got cataracts in both lenses and they had to be replaced.
Is it possible to swap those lenses for something focusable? Or are you generally satisfied/don't want to incur the cost? Or the tech simply not quite there yet?

I had a similar experience that involved some of the details that the Asmo describes.  Mine was for a routine cataract surgery in my left eye.  Later laser treatment was not unpleasant except for the sharp cracking sounds in my head when the laser was so repeatedly discharged..  I had previously had un-admitted difficulties while driving at night. After the surgery, Huzza!  I can see where I am going and have the ability to see  the dump truck (lorry for you Brits) that I was previously about to hit.
There is something to be said for good eyesight. People who have it, don't appreciate it until they don't, while people who don't have it, adapt and deceive themselves about their own limitation. That was actually what got me to go for surgery; my glasses had some fantastic dew problems in winter, and I just got tired of it, as my job often demands that I hang inside and outside at the same time (Stuff like surveillance cameras, radiolinks and the like. The hardware is always where the weather is)

Quote
My opthalmologist surgean was a comedian who kept me in laughter all the while.  He asked me what I wanted from my eyes. I said that I would like 21 year old eyes.  He said that he had a wish for a 21 year old pecker.

That man was a graduate physicist with a masters degree.  He came to his senses and continued his education to become an ophomologist.......... where the money is. I say this to agree with the Asmos cost of $6K US which is not merely chopped liver, to be sure.

Good on the wizards who can make it possible for us to see again.
That's awesome! My surgeon was a very competent down-to-business kind, and I appreciate that, although I would not have minded some more entertainment in my sharpy-pokey misery.

And yes, pointy hats off to the wizards.  :)
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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2018, 12:41:20 PM »
Correct. I got cataracts in both lenses and they had to be replaced.
Is it possible to swap those lenses for something focusable? Or are you generally satisfied/don't want to incur the cost? Or the tech simply not quite there yet?
I'm not aware that the tech is there yet. It would be good if it were. :D
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Asmodean

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2018, 02:09:24 PM »
Hmm... I have just read my old brochure, and they are talking about Multifocal and Accommodative IOLs. The latter seems to be focusable, rather than having several "static" focal points. Might be worth checking out?
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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #11 on: October 08, 2018, 02:37:39 PM »
Whoa, Asmo!

That sounds really cool...

I can relate to the operation part, a little. Had Lasik a while back. Worked for about 5 years, then I went back to being nearsighted. Still, it was a good 5 years, and I'm not as nearsighted as before.

Glad it's working out so well for you!

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #12 on: October 09, 2018, 10:45:43 AM »
Thanks!

We'll see if it holds, but if I start getting poorer vision, the laser correction is still on the table, because my cornea has not yet been polished down. Also, there is always an option of swapping out the implants, although that's a bit more invasive (not unlike what I described above, with the added bit of removing the old implants)

From what I understand, they recommend ICL to people under 45, so I still have a few good years in me in that sense ;-P
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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2018, 11:30:03 AM »
A few years ago I had cataracts removed, they were radial spoke cataracts not opaque lenses but a hardening of the lens in the shape of a little star fish.  This made my lenses a sort of ring of lenses so for example a bright point source of light was seen as a little ring of lights.  Anyway, my ophthalmologist took away the natural lens, leaving just the inner surface and put in intraocular lenses.  He asked me how I wanted my vision after the op and I said I would like good distance vision which is what I got.  I only need cheap magnifier glasses for reading otherwise I'm good.  Much cheaper buying them from a discount shop than buyint prescription glasses!  The op was done one eye at a time with several weeks in between.  It was done with a local anaesthetic and I found the experience very interesting.  I did not feel anything but I was wide awake and conscious throughout the procedure.  At the start of the op i could see the shadow of the instruments on my retina, but eventually the vision in the eye went completely black.  The doc placed an eye patch over the eye and then removed it the next day.  I was astounded at how much better my vision was after the operation.
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Dark Lightning

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Re: Contact lens implant, one+ year experience: a perspective
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2018, 03:53:13 AM »
If (when) I end up getting cataract surgery, I will opt for 20/20. It will be quite interesting to be able to see leaves in trees and pebbles on the ground without correction. I've been legally blind since my youth, and didn't get glasses until I was 11. Long story about that.