Author Topic: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.  (Read 14046 times)

jumbojak

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #195 on: September 05, 2018, 07:33:26 PM »
Okay, now that we have the technical details sorted, what's it for?
 

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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #196 on: September 05, 2018, 07:34:33 PM »
Sorry about the echo.

jumbojak

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #197 on: September 05, 2018, 07:38:51 PM »
Sorry about the echo.

It's a big, empty room. Happens.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #198 on: September 05, 2018, 07:39:43 PM »

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #199 on: September 07, 2018, 06:00:18 PM »
Of course, once you have bought a bellows you need another thing that gives you control over the iris in any automatic lens youbuse - or just settle for that lens' minimum f stop and a long exposure or lots of lighting.

For the Nikon lenses tgst little doodad is znother £70.

I am trying to find the little bar graph in the Info menu, the one that tells you how close you are to correct exposure on the Manual setting. Can't find the bugger!

With static subjects you can take several shots bracketing the optimal exposure. More of a problem with moving subjects. Photogrsphy beyond the snapshot can be expensive!

My "ringflash" would be ideal but it does not connect to the camera's processor via the hotshoe - thus it does not shorten the flash according to the reflected light from the subject- takes several shots to find the right settings, limiting the light by limiting the speed.

Ho, hum . . .

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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #200 on: September 07, 2018, 07:21:52 PM »
Of course, once you have bought a bellows you need another thing that gives you control over the iris in any automatic lens youbuse - or just settle for that lens' minimum f stop and a long exposure or lots of lighting.

For the Nikon lenses tgst little doodad is znother £70.

I am trying to find the little bar graph in the Info menu, the one that tells you how close you are to correct exposure on the Manual setting. Can't find the bugger!

With static subjects you can take several shots bracketing the optimal exposure. More of a problem with moving subjects. Photogrsphy beyond the snapshot can be expensive!

My "ringflash" would be ideal but it does not connect to the camera's processor via the hotshoe - thus it does not shorten the flash according to the reflected light from the subject- takes several shots to find the right settings, limiting the light by limiting the speed.

Ho, hum . . .

Sorry. my camera is a different model (D600) and I've never done manual exposure, so can't suggest where to find the exposure bar.

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #201 on: September 07, 2018, 08:01:57 PM »
Of course, once you have bought a bellows you need another thing that gives you control over the iris in any automatic lens youbuse - or just settle for that lens' minimum f stop and a long exposure or lots of lighting.

For the Nikon lenses tgst little doodad is znother £70.

I am trying to find the little bar graph in the Info menu, the one that tells you how close you are to correct exposure on the Manual setting. Can't find the bugger!

With static subjects you can take several shots bracketing the optimal exposure. More of a problem with moving subjects. Photogrsphy beyond the snapshot can be expensive!

My "ringflash" would be ideal but it does not connect to the camera's processor via the hotshoe - thus it does not shorten the flash according to the reflected light from the subject- takes several shots to find the right settings, limiting the light by limiting the speed.

Ho, hum . . .

Sorry. my camera is a different model (D600) and I've never done manual exposure, so can't suggest where to find the exposure bar.

I was using it not so long ago but can't remember which mode and settings I was using. Not enough time to play at the moment but will get round to it one day. There are so many possible permutations of settings spread over multiple menus and modes. I remember a time when it was so much simpler, just point and push the little lever down . . .

And I run out of mental and physical stamina too quickly!
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #202 on: September 07, 2018, 10:08:15 PM »
Nearly 10pm and I have worked out how the iris is operated, realised that the adapter I thought would do the job does not and they do not actually make one that does allow manual iris control - despite the fact such would not be difficult and a real boon. Found a few people asking how it can be done and all sorts of ideas, including hacking the bayonet plates of an couple of short extension rings and wiring them together, one at each end of the bellows! That's a skein of 8 wires.

Looking at the smallest extension ring. All it needs is a little external lever fitted to move the internal lever that moves the iris lever to achieve manual control. Whilst keeping the whole thing 100% light proof of course. Hmm, maybe an external screw adjuster rather than a lever, easier to lightproof a screw thread . . .



PS
Oh yes they do do the right bit, took a bit of searching, found one on Ebay for about half price, used but in box with instructions. Now in need of an old fashioned cable release to use it  . . ,
« Last Edit: September 08, 2018, 03:40:32 PM by Dave »
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #203 on: September 11, 2018, 11:03:09 AM »
Well, my 2ndH but mint condition Nikon BR-6 adapter srrived - but it was not quite what I thought.

It has a bayonet female on one side to fit the lens, and there is a little lever to operate the iris (which is now fully open by default) but the other side is a 52mm female filter thread, won't fit the bellows.   :violin:

:thinking:

Rummage in photographic odds and ends box.

 :thumbsup2:

Found: Nikon bayonet to 52mm  male filter thread, the perfect partner! Also means I can reverse fit the lenses, with apperture control, directly on to the camera at least.

However, Nikon, in their wisdom, have designed the BR-6 to require a lockable, old fashioned, mechanical cable release to hold the iris open at the desired setting. Not so easy to come by. The local shop has one, dusty one left in stock at £20. Found a very short one in the bits box but not lockable, hmmm, will think about that . . .
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #204 on: September 11, 2018, 11:23:05 AM »
Well, my 2ndH but mint condition Nikon BR-6 adapter srrived - but it was not quite what I thought.

It has a bayonet female on one side to fit the lens, and there is a little lever to operate the iris (which is now fully open by default) but the other side is a 52mm female filter thread, won't fit the bellows.   :violin:

:thinking:

Rummage in photographic odds and ends box.

 :thumbsup2:

Found: Nikon bayonet to 52mm  male filter thread, the perfect partner! Also means I can reverse fit the lenses, with apperture control, directly on to the camera at least.

However, Nikon, in their wisdom, have designed the BR-6 to require a lockable, old fashioned, mechanical cable release to hold the iris open at the desired setting. Not so easy to come by. The local shop has one, dusty one left in stock at £20. Found a very short one in the bits box but not lockable, hmmm, will think about that . . .

Good luck, Dave. I would love to contribute something useful, but my brain is empty right now.

jumbojak

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #205 on: September 11, 2018, 12:08:44 PM »
How about a jig with a set screw that acts on the lever?
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #206 on: September 11, 2018, 12:22:21 PM »
How about a jig with a set screw that acts on the lever?

Not practical I'm afraid.

Thinking more along something that fits to the little cable I have that, via an M4 cap head screw, pushes on the plunger. That gives apperture control over the whole range. No idea what the apperture will be between f5.6 and f22 though! If Ican find the lightmeter display function on the screen that does not matter.
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #207 on: September 11, 2018, 12:59:19 PM »
Dave, perhaps you should rather control the camera via its USB cable, instead of using a mechanical cable release. I control my Nikon from my desktop PC with an excellent free program called digiCamControl, but I don't think there is an Android version.

http://www.digicamcontrol.com/

You could try DSLR Remote Control for Android, but I have never used it, so don't know how good it is.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.pa.dslrremotecontrol

hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #208 on: September 11, 2018, 01:12:00 PM »
I found another Android camera control app that may work for you:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.rupiapps.cameraconnectcast

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #209 on: September 11, 2018, 04:53:17 PM »
Dave, perhaps you should rather control the camera via its USB cable, instead of using a mechanical cable release. I control my Nikon from my desktop PC with an excellent free program called digiCamControl, but I don't think there is an Android version.

http://www.digicamcontrol.com/

You could try DSLR Remote Control for Android, but I have never used it, so don't know how good it is.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.pa.dslrremotecontrol

It is a case of operating the iris on an automatic lense that has no actual control connection with the camera - the non-auto bellows are between them. The motor actuating the iris is actually in the camera and moves a little lever poking out of the bayonet end of the lense. The BR-6 adapter fits to the bayonet of the lens and the lever/cable socket on that moves the iris lever on the lens.

The lens defaults to f22 normally, which is great for depth of field but is lousy for composition or fast shots without loads of light (that can get into the possibly 10mm or less gap between the lens and the subject.)  With the BR-6 adaptor fitted it starts with the iris wide open and moving the lever/cable stops it down, but it springs back open without some kind of locking mechanism. But there is no scale so the "light meter" display is useful, otherwise its guesswork and test shots.

I have not yet needed to investigate the USB or WIFI functions; I use an electronic, cabled, remote shutter release. My Lumix has NFC that enables me to stick it on a tripod in a garden, looking at a bird feeder, say, and see its view and control the zoom and shutter via my smartphone, independant of any WIFI router. Later models, like the D5600, have NFC I think.

Yours is a more "professional" level job, Hermes, may have functions the "hobby" jobs don't.

But will look at those links out of interest, thanks.

A project for lighting through narrow gaps, a ring or strips of LEDs, all pointing to the centre with brightness control, is under consideration. The LED 'ringflash' I have is actually too  bright on the lowest setting for ultra close-up.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74