Author Topic: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.  (Read 14048 times)

jumbojak

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #165 on: August 16, 2018, 02:36:14 AM »
No need to switch to manual: just keep it half-pressed after focusing and then move the camera to compose the shot. It will keep the focus.

Here's a situation where I think the switch to manual focus makes a lot of sense:


This was taken with a shutter speed of thirty seconds using a remote and a flashlight to highlight the tree over the course of the exposure. Using the flashlight to focus the camera on the tree in such low light uses a half press. Being able to trigger the camera from a bit of distance with the camera rock solid on an undisturbed tripod lends more stability and gives a bit more time to light the tree from both sides. While I could have set the focus using a half press, on the off chance that something were to fly into the image with the auto-focus activated - like a bat or bug - I might have wasted several shots before realizing that the camera had decided to focus somewhere besides the tree. This would be more of a problem without a remote but I can't see any downside to the habit for this sort of photo.

It's not a perfect example and I know that there are workarounds but having the focus locked gave me a bit more peace of mind while I was hobbling about with the flashlight. On a side note, I wish I had taken this a little earlier when the sun was casting a bit more light on the horizon. I also need to find a better light for this kind of work. I took possession of a Maglite 6D today for the warmer color temperature but it doesn't focus quite as tightly as I would like. It's quite difficult to find a LED flashlight that doesn't use a very cool colored bulb to increase its lumen output. The bluer tints don't work well at all.
 

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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #166 on: August 16, 2018, 04:16:30 AM »
Good technique and nice picture, JJ.
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jumbojak

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #167 on: August 16, 2018, 04:33:22 AM »
Good technique and nice picture, JJ.

My technique for this type of shot still needs quite a bit of work and I really don't think it's a very good picture. I was having trouble finding the right balance between the thirty second exposure and an aperture that didn't make it look like daylight. Plus, the timing was off by about twenty minutes on the setup.

It's only my third attempt so far though and I was a bit worn down from an afternoon of heavy weed eating. After reading Hermes' comment I wanted to get something out to show where locking the focus might be advantageous.

I'm still looking for the perfect flashlight too... at least, one that isn't several hundred dollars! The color temperature of the 6D is almost perfect but the beam focusing is rather crude. There is basically a flood mode and a partial flood mode. Perhaps that's just a necessary compromise when using an incandescent bulb. I have to do more research.
 

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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #168 on: August 16, 2018, 04:49:59 AM »
Good technique and nice picture, JJ.

My technique for this type of shot still needs quite a bit of work and I really don't think it's a very good picture. I was having trouble finding the right balance between the thirty second exposure and an aperture that didn't make it look like daylight. Plus, the timing was off by about twenty minutes on the setup.

It's only my third attempt so far though and I was a bit worn down from an afternoon of heavy weed eating. After reading Hermes' comment I wanted to get something out to show where locking the focus might be advantageous.

I'm still looking for the perfect flashlight too... at least, one that isn't several hundred dollars! The color temperature of the 6D is almost perfect but the beam focusing is rather crude. There is basically a flood mode and a partial flood mode. Perhaps that's just a necessary compromise when using an incandescent bulb. I have to do more research.

That is a technique I've never tried and think I should some time. Your result looks very interesting. In this case you are of course right about the focus. My comment was really about general, day to day photos when you want to take a shot quickly.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2018, 05:38:06 AM by hermes2015 »

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #169 on: August 16, 2018, 05:08:53 AM »
Good technique and nice picture, JJ.

My technique for this type of shot still needs quite a bit of work and I really don't think it's a very good picture. I was having trouble finding the right balance between the thirty second exposure and an aperture that didn't make it look like daylight. Plus, the timing was off by about twenty minutes on the setup.

It's only my third attempt so far though and I was a bit worn down from an afternoon of heavy weed eating. After reading Hermes' comment I wanted to get something out to show where locking the focus might be advantageous.

I'm still looking for the perfect flashlight too... at least, one that isn't several hundred dollars! The color temperature of the 6D is almost perfect but the beam focusing is rather crude. There is basically a flood mode and a partial flood mode. Perhaps that's just a necessary compromise when using an incandescent bulb. I have to do more research.

One is rarely fully satisfied with one's own work. The feeling of the need to improve your technique does not surprise me,
« Last Edit: August 16, 2018, 02:14:04 PM by Dave »
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #170 on: August 16, 2018, 05:41:42 AM »
One is rsrely fully sstisfied with one's own work. The feeling of the need to improve your technique does not surprise me,

You are so right. The worst time is in the morning, when I look at the previous day's work and see how terrible it is.

Bad Penny II

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #171 on: August 16, 2018, 02:00:27 PM »
Here's a situation where I think the switch to manual focus makes a lot of sense:


I like that.
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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #172 on: August 22, 2018, 12:10:05 PM »
The effect of a circular polariser.



Without



With (rotated through 90°)


The effect is subjective and dependent on what you want to achieve. One may want the reflections to highlight how shiny the car is. Or you may wish to accentuate the actual colour of the paintwork.

NOTE: There are things called linear polarisers. They should not be used with a camera with an auto focus system as it stops the auto focus system from working.
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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #173 on: August 22, 2018, 01:43:54 PM »
The effect of a circular polariser.



Without



With (rotated through 90°)


The effect is subjective and dependent on what you want to achieve. One may want the reflections to highlight how shiny the car is. Or you may wish to accentuate the actual colour of the paintwork.

NOTE: There are things called linear polarisers. They should not be used with a camera with an auto focus system as it stops the auto focus system from working.

Who cares about the polarising filter?  I want the car!  LOL

Actually, I once had a drive of a mate's light-weight V-12 E-Type.  Smooooth, putting your foot down was like pushing the throttle all the way forward in a jet.  And yes, I have done that, around the same time too...

Now, where were we?  Oh yes, circular polarising filters.  Hmmm, might have to get me one.  Always had a linear polarising filter to use on my Minolta SLR, I think I might like one of these on my Canon SLR.
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Bad Penny II

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #174 on: August 22, 2018, 02:15:29 PM »
The effect of a circular polariser.



Without



With (rotated through 90°)


The effect is subjective and dependent on what you want to achieve. One may want the reflections to highlight how shiny the car is. Or you may wish to accentuate the actual colour of the paintwork.

NOTE: There are things called linear polarisers. They should not be used with a camera with an auto focus system as it stops the auto focus system from working.

Who cares about the polarising filter?  I want the car!  LOL

Actually, I once had a drive of a mate's light-weight V-12 E-Type.  Smooooth, putting your foot down was like pushing the throttle all the way forward in a jet.  And yes, I have done that, around the same time too...

Now, where were we? 

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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #175 on: August 22, 2018, 03:17:26 PM »
The effect is quite dramatic. I think I also detect a slight improvement in contrast of the cars parked under the trees.

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #176 on: August 22, 2018, 03:36:42 PM »
Hey, it makes men in white hats invisible as well!

Oh, he moved between shots - OK . . .
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jumbojak

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #177 on: August 26, 2018, 03:06:05 PM »
I've set a challenge for myself. I can take a very clear photo of the moon, that's quite easy. What I want though is a photo of the moon and the clouds it's illuminating. The clouds are proving tricky even without the moon being an overexposed blob in the middle.

Taking the moon out of the frame leaves things either too dark or too "smeared" depending on the shutter speed. I'll keep working on it though I do know I'll have to stitch two photos together to get what I want. If I could work out the clouds I think I'd be alright.
 

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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #178 on: August 26, 2018, 03:32:16 PM »
I've set a challenge for myself. I can take a very clear photo of the moon, that's quite easy. What I want though is a photo of the moon and the clouds it's illuminating. The clouds are proving tricky even without the moon being an overexposed blob in the middle.

Taking the moon out of the frame leaves things either too dark or too "smeared" depending on the shutter speed. I'll keep working on it though I do know I'll have to stitch two photos together to get what I want. If I could work out the clouds I think I'd be alright.

Damn clouds will keep moving and changing shape!
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #179 on: August 26, 2018, 03:32:36 PM »
I've set a challenge for myself. I can take a very clear photo of the moon, that's quite easy. What I want though is a photo of the moon and the clouds it's illuminating. The clouds are proving tricky even without the moon being an overexposed blob in the middle.

Taking the moon out of the frame leaves things either too dark or too "smeared" depending on the shutter speed. I'll keep working on it though I do know I'll have to stitch two photos together to get what I want. If I could work out the clouds I think I'd be alright.

You could try to take series of 3 shots: one to expose the moon properly, one 2 stops below that, and one 2 stops overexposed. Then blend them to create an HDR photo. I don't know whether your software can do that. If not, download an evaluation copy of Photomatix from

https://www.hdrsoft.com/

It is considered to be one of the best tools to create HDRs.