Author Topic: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.  (Read 18944 times)

hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #150 on: August 15, 2018, 08:42:36 AM »
Hermes said:
Quote
That's odd, because according to Nikon, the minimum aperture is f/32.

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/camera-lenses/af-zoom-nikkor-70-300mm-f%252f4-5.6g.html#tab-ProductDetail-ProductTabs-TechSpecs

If the camera shows f/40, then there must be some incompatibility problem.

Hmm, I found  a spec for a .Nikkor 70-300mm  that gave f45 as the min, but no  inage stab.

But there is a VR model the quotes f32-40 for the zoom range:

https://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/lens/zoom/telephotozoom/af-s_vr_zoom70-300mmf_45-56g_if/index.htm

I have noticed there are various Nikkor models at the same focal length

The naming of the lenses is confusing, so perhaps it is this one. I think the problem is that at such a small aperture the camera had to use a very slow shuttter speed to get correct exposure, leading to a blurry photo. Even VR is not able to compensate at very slow speeds, especially at long focal lengths.
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #151 on: August 15, 2018, 09:36:47 AM »
Hermes said:
Quote
That's odd, because according to Nikon, the minimum aperture is f/32.

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/camera-lenses/af-zoom-nikkor-70-300mm-f%252f4-5.6g.html#tab-ProductDetail-ProductTabs-TechSpecs

If the camera shows f/40, then there must be some incompatibility problem.

Hmm, I found  a spec for a .Nikkor 70-300mm  that gave f45 as the min, but no  inage stab.

But there is a VR model the quotes f32-40 for the zoom range:

https://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/lens/zoom/telephotozoom/af-s_vr_zoom70-300mmf_45-56g_if/index.htm

I have noticed there are various Nikkor models at the same focal length

The naming of the lenses is confusing, so perhaps it is this one. I think the problem is that at such a small aperture the camera had to use a very slow shuttter speed to get correct exposure, leading to a blurry photo. Even VR is not able to compensate at very slow speeds, especially at long focal lengths.

My thinking as well, hence my remark about picking the right combination of speed and app for the subject being part of the technical art of photography. Can be a difficult choice at times.

I have a model B Box Brownie (with box and manual), wonder if you can still get 120 film . . . Gotta be easier!
« Last Edit: August 15, 2018, 09:47:55 AM by Dave »
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #152 on: August 15, 2018, 09:44:05 AM »
Hermes said:
Quote
That's odd, because according to Nikon, the minimum aperture is f/32.

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/nikon-products/product/camera-lenses/af-zoom-nikkor-70-300mm-f%252f4-5.6g.html#tab-ProductDetail-ProductTabs-TechSpecs

If the camera shows f/40, then there must be some incompatibility problem.

Hmm, I found  a spec for a .Nikkor 70-300mm  that gave f45 as the min, but no  inage stab.

But there is a VR model the quotes f32-40 for the zoom range:

https://imaging.nikon.com/lineup/lens/zoom/telephotozoom/af-s_vr_zoom70-300mmf_45-56g_if/index.htm

I have noticed there are various Nikkor models at the same focal length

The naming of the lenses is confusing, so perhaps it is this one. I think the problem is that at such a small aperture the camera had to use a very slow shuttter speed to get correct exposure, leading to a blurry photo. Even VR is not able to compensate at very slow speeds, especially at long focal lengths.

My thinking as well, hence my remark about picking the right combination of speed and app for the subject being part of the technical art of photography. Can be a difficult choice at times.

I have a model K Box Brownie, wonder if you can still get 120 film . . . Gotta be easier!

Ooh I love those decadent brownies!

I think we should look at the EXIF data to see what the shutter speed was.
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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #153 on: August 15, 2018, 09:56:31 AM »
Image quality

If you want the best optical image quality as a rule of thumb one should not shoot at the largest nor smallest aperture of a lens. The ends of a lenses aperture range are almost always a technical compromise the get the largest and smallest usable apertures. The optical 'sweet spot' is usually a couple of stops down or up from the ends of the lens's range. But that is just for optical quality and takes no account of the necessity for depth-of-field or the avoidance of camera shake.

A small aperture, f16 or smaller, can be subject to reduced optical quality from diffraction.
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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #154 on: August 15, 2018, 09:59:56 AM »
I mis-remembered the model, it's a B, with "Group" "Landscape" and "Portrait" lenses and f-stops from f11 - f22. Even instructions for processing Kodak Panatomic-X film and a table for Wratten filter factors in the box.

I want the World's Fair and the Beau models, but both very, very rare. And very, very expensive of course.

Also have an Ensign Ful-Vue - love the art deco shape!

« Last Edit: August 15, 2018, 10:15:09 AM by Dave »
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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #155 on: August 15, 2018, 10:56:15 AM »
Focusing off or pre-focusing:

There is probably a technical term for it but . . .

Say you want a picture of your dog bounding towards you in the park. Pressing the shutter release starts the AF but it takes a period of time to get there - by which time said pooch has arrived and is looking for the next game.

So, pick the spot where you want the dog to be and focus, half pressing the release, on the grass at that spot, or a bush or whatever at the same distance and KEEP THE BUTTON HALF PRESSED.

Then compose your shot, tell the other to release the hound, fully press when the dig is at the spot and bingo. I would also go for continuous release mode and press just before - one of them is bound to have floppy ears a-flying if poochy has such appendages.
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #156 on: August 15, 2018, 03:18:11 PM »
Playing with extension rings and a telephoto lens.

The flower image is 30mm in diameter and the whole image is in the centre of an A4 sheet.

18-140mm lens set on 140mm + 36mm ring:

Furthest focus point at 660mm



Nearest focus point at 35mm



I did not worry too much about lighting, tweaked a bit in Light Room, more interested in image size in the frame.

Not a bad range for such shots, flying beasties might be intimidated by the camera at 35mm but at 100mm, say, still a decent sized image.

Distance set at 100mm:

« Last Edit: August 15, 2018, 04:45:34 PM by Dave »
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #157 on: August 15, 2018, 04:55:22 PM »
That's looking very promising. How does a 36mm extension compromise the maximum aperture of the lens? Not that you would want to shoot at the maximum anyway.
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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #158 on: August 15, 2018, 05:00:10 PM »
Focusing off or pre-focusing:

There is probably a technical term for it but . . .

Say you want a picture of your dog bounding towards you in the park. Pressing the shutter release starts the AF but it takes a period of time to get there - by which time said pooch has arrived and is looking for the next game.

So, pick the spot where you want the dog to be and focus, half pressing the release, on the grass at that spot, or a bush or whatever at the same distance and KEEP THE BUTTON HALF PRESSED.

Then compose your shot, tell the other to release the hound, fully press when the dig is at the spot and bingo. I would also go for continuous release mode and press just before - one of them is bound to have floppy ears a-flying if poochy has such appendages.

I figured out that I can do a half press with the auto focus and then switch to manual to keep the focus in the range I set. I don't know if your lenses have that option but it works well on the kit lens that came with my camera.
 

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #159 on: August 15, 2018, 05:19:48 PM »
Focusing off or pre-focusing:

There is probably a technical term for it but . . .

Say you want a picture of your dog bounding towards you in the park. Pressing the shutter release starts the AF but it takes a period of time to get there - by which time said pooch has arrived and is looking for the next game.

So, pick the spot where you want the dog to be and focus, half pressing the release, on the grass at that spot, or a bush or whatever at the same distance and KEEP THE BUTTON HALF PRESSED.

Then compose your shot, tell the other to release the hound, fully press when the dig is at the spot and bingo. I would also go for continuous release mode and press just before - one of them is bound to have floppy ears a-flying if poochy has such appendages.

I figured out that I can do a half press with the auto focus and then switch to manual to keep the focus in the range I set. I don't know if your lenses have that option but it works well on the kit lens that came with my camera.

That's a new one on me, JJ, have to be a bit dextrous to achieve that! But it makes sense and manual focusing can be a bit tricky in the viewfinder, that would get round the problem.

Thanks!
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #160 on: August 15, 2018, 05:26:57 PM »
Focusing off or pre-focusing:

There is probably a technical term for it but . . .

Say you want a picture of your dog bounding towards you in the park. Pressing the shutter release starts the AF but it takes a period of time to get there - by which time said pooch has arrived and is looking for the next game.

So, pick the spot where you want the dog to be and focus, half pressing the release, on the grass at that spot, or a bush or whatever at the same distance and KEEP THE BUTTON HALF PRESSED.

Then compose your shot, tell the other to release the hound, fully press when the dig is at the spot and bingo. I would also go for continuous release mode and press just before - one of them is bound to have floppy ears a-flying if poochy has such appendages.

I figured out that I can do a half press with the auto focus and then switch to manual to keep the focus in the range I set. I don't know if your lenses have that option but it works well on the kit lens that came with my camera.

No need to switch to manual: just keep it half-pressed after focusing and then move the camera to compose the shot. It will keep the focus.
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #161 on: August 15, 2018, 05:45:25 PM »
Focusing off or pre-focusing:

There is probably a technical term for it but . . .

Say you want a picture of your dog bounding towards you in the park. Pressing the shutter release starts the AF but it takes a period of time to get there - by which time said pooch has arrived and is looking for the next game.

So, pick the spot where you want the dog to be and focus, half pressing the release, on the grass at that spot, or a bush or whatever at the same distance and KEEP THE BUTTON HALF PRESSED.

Then compose your shot, tell the other to release the hound, fully press when the dig is at the spot and bingo. I would also go for continuous release mode and press just before - one of them is bound to have floppy ears a-flying if poochy has such appendages.

I figured out that I can do a half press with the auto focus and then switch to manual to keep the focus in the range I set. I don't know if your lenses have that option but it works well on the kit lens that came with my camera.

No need to switch to manual: just keep it half-pressed after focusing and then move the camera to compose the shot. It will keep the focus.

I think there are still possible applications for JJ's trick in some cases of "still life" and tripod use. Worth remembering IMHO.
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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #162 on: August 15, 2018, 05:47:19 PM »
That's looking very promising. How does a 36mm extension compromise the maximum aperture of the lens? Not that you would want to shoot at the maximum anyway.

There was no table of f-stop alteration with these rings, but I am sure that I have seen one somewhere. Will dig in my box of manuals and data sheets sometime. It will probably date back to ny 35mm days though! I would rather not keep swapping the lenses too much, wear on contacts etc.

Also need some way of setting up a constant light source, the ring light is too bright to test the more open end of the f range and with the lens close to the object. I do not have enough neutral density filters in that size.

Hmm, maybe the laptop screen or a backlit sheet of paper - difficult to avoid shadows when the lens is close to the object.
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #163 on: August 15, 2018, 05:52:36 PM »
That's looking very promising. How does a 36mm extension compromise the maximum aperture of the lens? Not that you would want to shoot at the maximum anyway.

There was no table of f-stop alteration with these rings, but I am sure that I have seen one somewhere. Will dig in my box of manuals and data sheets sometime. It will probably date back to ny 35mm days though! I would rather not keep swapping the lenses too much, wear on contacts etc.

Also need some way of setting up a constant light source, the ring light is too bright to test the more open end of the f range and with the lens close to the object. I do not have enough neutral density filters in that size.

Hmm, maybe the laptop screen or a backlit sheet of paper - difficult to avoid shadows when the lens is close to the object.

Perhaps you could rig up a barn door type of flood light to get the correct brightness.
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #164 on: August 15, 2018, 06:14:45 PM »
That's looking very promising. How does a 36mm extension compromise the maximum aperture of the lens? Not that you would want to shoot at the maximum anyway.

There was no table of f-stop alteration with these rings, but I am sure that I have seen one somewhere. Will dig in my box of manuals and data sheets sometime. It will probably date back to ny 35mm days though! I would rather not keep swapping the lenses too much, wear on contacts etc.

Also need some way of setting up a constant light source, the ring light is too bright to test the more open end of the f range and with the lens close to the object. I do not have enough neutral density filters in that size.

Hmm, maybe the laptop screen or a backlit sheet of paper - difficult to avoid shadows when the lens is close to the object.

Perhaps you could rig up a barn door type of flood light to get the correct brightness.
Hmm, no barn door type lights! I think the backlit sheet, using a reading light, will be my first attempt. As I took those pics they got darker as the lens appproached the obect, a effect that was far worse with the ruler pics where the lens was a whole lot closer. There I had to use a torch shining sideways into the gap!

For just light/f-stop measurement I will adjust the manual apperture, at a set speed, until the exposure indicator scale, in the info display, is at zero in each case. Full screen metering seems indicated.

This is partly in prep for using a sheet, backlit with a UV LED array, all set up on a tripod or two as a moth attractor. There though I will be using flash to get the action frozen. That close the smallest f-stop will be employed I think! Need to make a moth to get the set-up and method right!
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