Author Topic: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.  (Read 13926 times)

hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #45 on: August 08, 2018, 05:22:07 AM »
Yes, I can see that the VR system is stretched a bit under those conditions. Another option would be to use shutter priority mode and set a very high shutter speed, along with a higher ISO speed to still get decent exposure.

Yes, high shutter speed + low f No OK for "shallow" subjects, the f4.5 on the 55-300 at 300 is a limitting factor though. Have to check online for the Lumix specs. I still suffer from the old concerns about loosing quality at high ISO to graininess, though that gave some great artistic effects using B&W film!.  Not sure what the effect is on digital, will experiment more.

There is more data retained in a "darkish" image than a "burned out" one.

Set it at ISO 800 or even 1600. You may be pleasantly surprised. On my D600 the noise at 1600 is still very low.

Will give it a go!

(Just checked camera, it was set at ISO 100!!)

That's unnecessarily low for normal photography. I have mine set on Auto ISO, with minimum 200, which means it does not drop below 200, but can go as high as needed automatically. One can limit the maximum, but I let mine go all the way to 6400 when it feels it has to, which has never happened to me. There is a special very high setting of 25600 for surveillance work, but I haven't tried it.

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/learn-and-explore/a/tips-and-techniques/understanding-auto-iso.html
« Last Edit: August 08, 2018, 06:20:01 AM by hermes2015 »

hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #46 on: August 08, 2018, 08:42:12 AM »

Tank

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #47 on: August 08, 2018, 09:00:27 AM »
Yes, I can see that the VR system is stretched a bit under those conditions. Another option would be to use shutter priority mode and set a very high shutter speed, along with a higher ISO speed to still get decent exposure.

Yes, high shutter speed + low f No OK for "shallow" subjects, the f4.5 on the 55-300 at 300 is a limitting factor though. Have to check online for the Lumix specs. I still suffer from the old concerns about loosing quality at high ISO to graininess, though that gave some great artistic effects using B&W film!.  Not sure what the effect is on digital, will experiment more.

There is more data retained in a "darkish" image than a "burned out" one.

Set it at ISO 800 or even 1600. You may be pleasantly surprised. On my D600 the noise at 1600 is still very low.

Will give it a go!

(Just checked camera, it was set at ISO 100!!)

That's unnecessarily low for normal photography. I have mine set on Auto ISO, with minimum 200, which means it does not drop below 200, but can go as high as needed automatically. One can limit the maximum, but I let mine go all the way to 6400 when it feels it has to, which has never happened to me. There is a special very high setting of 25600 for surveillance work, but I haven't tried it.

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/learn-and-explore/a/tips-and-techniques/understanding-auto-iso.html

"That's unnecessarily low for normal photography"! Did you ever use Kodachrome? It was 25 ASA!
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #48 on: August 08, 2018, 09:02:00 AM »
This may be helpful.


Thanks, Hermes, that filled in some gaps (even after reading the manual!)
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #49 on: August 08, 2018, 09:08:56 AM »
Yes, I can see that the VR system is stretched a bit under those conditions. Another option would be to use shutter priority mode and set a very high shutter speed, along with a higher ISO speed to still get decent exposure.

Yes, high shutter speed + low f No OK for "shallow" subjects, the f4.5 on the 55-300 at 300 is a limitting factor though. Have to check online for the Lumix specs. I still suffer from the old concerns about loosing quality at high ISO to graininess, though that gave some great artistic effects using B&W film!.  Not sure what the effect is on digital, will experiment more.

There is more data retained in a "darkish" image than a "burned out" one.

Set it at ISO 800 or even 1600. You may be pleasantly surprised. On my D600 the noise at 1600 is still very low.

Will give it a go!

(Just checked camera, it was set at ISO 100!!)

That's unnecessarily low for normal photography. I have mine set on Auto ISO, with minimum 200, which means it does not drop below 200, but can go as high as needed automatically. One can limit the maximum, but I let mine go all the way to 6400 when it feels it has to, which has never happened to me. There is a special very high setting of 25600 for surveillance work, but I haven't tried it.

https://www.nikonusa.com/en/learn-and-explore/a/tips-and-techniques/understanding-auto-iso.html

"That's unnecessarily low for normal photography"! Did you ever use Kodachrome? It was 25 ASA!

Sure, but that was film. We are talking digital, and modern cameras do a remarkable job at high ISO settings. Give it a try.

Tank

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #50 on: August 08, 2018, 09:12:24 AM »
Film sensitivity or 'speed'.

In the pre-digital era the sensitivity of film was rated as 'ASA' and started as low as 25, and went in a sequence approximating 25, 64, 100, 200, 400, 800 etc. and each step vaguely approximated a 'stop' like shutter speed and aperture size.

There was a distinct trade off between speed and picture quality. The higher the speed the lower the quality. There were two distinct process types, slides (projected) and negatives (printed). And within slides there were two distinct processes Kodak's 'Kodachrome' and the 'E6' for the rest.

Digital photography has inherited the terminology but as it has improved it has expanded the sensitivity range out of all recognition to the film era. While there are still issues with quality vs sensitivity I.E. the higher the sensitivity the poorer the quality you can now use sensitivities of 3200 with relative impunity and as technology improves the usability of higher sensitivities is bound to improve.

Another benefit of digital technology is that one can change sensitivity between frames and not wait till you had to finish a whole roll of film!
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #51 on: August 08, 2018, 09:23:19 AM »
Thanks, Tank, for your explanation.

Dave, for your zoom lens at 300mm, use AUTO ISO, set the ISO at 200, set maximum ISO at 3200, set the minimum shutter speed at 1/250 seconds, turn on VR. Try it and see whether it works well for you, but I'm pretty sure you will see an improvement.

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #52 on: August 08, 2018, 09:42:24 AM »
I have had a wuick trial of the bipod idea - a great improvement for me!

Even with the bipod egs together the 100mm between them gives a degree of lateral and rotational steadiness, reducing possible movement mainly to tilting back and forth - which is not really a problem with one's face and body forming the "third leg".

With the bipod legs apart there is, obviously, an increase in steadiness. Even without a pan&tilt or ball head (bith on a bit of friction) one can step forward between the bipod legs, and bend forward slightly, or step back, and crouch slightly, to get upward or downward shots.

The bipod means that you can always cosy up to a fence, say, for extra steadiness. The main disadvantage, with any support, is the inability for that fast, spontaneous shot, of a bird say, that a hand held camera gives. But then, my "fast spontaneous shots" are usually just of a blurred blob anyway!

A quick release camera mount is handy.
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #53 on: August 08, 2018, 09:45:31 AM »
Thanks, Tank, for your explanation.

Dave, for your zoom lens at 300mm, use AUTO ISO, set the ISO at 200, set maximum ISO at 3200, set the minimum shutter speed at 1/250 seconds, turn on VR. Try it and see whether it works well for you, but I'm pretty sure you will see an improvement.

I set that, 'cepting 1600 instead of 3200, after watching the video. VR is always on!

Thanks again, Hermes.
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #54 on: August 08, 2018, 09:54:03 AM »
I took these a few minutes ago in my place. I did not do any noise reduction or any other processing. Please ignore the bad focus in some, as they were taken in a hurry. The point is to compare the high ISO noise.

ISO 200


ISO 400


ISO 800


ISO 1600


ISO 3200


ISO 6400

hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #55 on: August 08, 2018, 09:59:54 AM »
Thanks, Tank, for your explanation.

Dave, for your zoom lens at 300mm, use AUTO ISO, set the ISO at 200, set maximum ISO at 3200, set the minimum shutter speed at 1/250 seconds, turn on VR. Try it and see whether it works well for you, but I'm pretty sure you will see an improvement.

I set that, 'cepting 1600 instead of 3200, after watching the video. VR is always on!

Thanks again, Hermes.

You are welcome and good luck. The shutter speed is recommended to be the inverse of the focal length, hence the recommended 1/250 second.

Tank

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #56 on: August 08, 2018, 10:34:05 AM »
Thanks, Tank, for your explanation.

Dave, for your zoom lens at 300mm, use AUTO ISO, set the ISO at 200, set maximum ISO at 3200, set the minimum shutter speed at 1/250 seconds, turn on VR. Try it and see whether it works well for you, but I'm pretty sure you will see an improvement.

I'm building a basic set of descriptions for the novice. I'm adding them a single posts first to get them sense checked and then editing them back into the first post of the thread for the new reader. So you will see posts from me that bear no relationship to the flow of the thread :)
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #57 on: August 08, 2018, 10:43:21 AM »
Thanks, Tank, for your explanation.

Dave, for your zoom lens at 300mm, use AUTO ISO, set the ISO at 200, set maximum ISO at 3200, set the minimum shutter speed at 1/250 seconds, turn on VR. Try it and see whether it works well for you, but I'm pretty sure you will see an improvement.

I set that, 'cepting 1600 instead of 3200, after watching the video. VR is always on!

Thanks again, Hermes.

You are welcome and good luck. The shutter speed is recommended to be the inverse of the focal length, hence the recommended 1/250 second.

After watching the video I left the shutter speed at "Auto" in case I swap lenses.

And, in answer to a question in a post I missed before. Yes, I did try 25 ASA film, in Cyprus, where there is a lot of sunshine! It was on a very cheap Halina 35X camera (all I could afford in those days) and basically a waste, no better than 100 ASA. We had a darkroom in the camp but could only process B&W film, so I could not expand and crop colour pictures. Learned a lot about things like using a ball of cotton wool, or shaped piece of torn paper, on a thin wire, or a hole in a card to "enhance" small areas - ah, nostalgia! Not the same as on an image editor - you could waste a lot of paper learning! Even played with using Indian ink, or scratches with a piece of razor blade, on the negatives to get effects.

We also got o-o-d paper from the aerial recon people, slow, high res stuff, on rolls 18" wide. We did an exposure of the negative of a scorpion, on 4ft of this, with the paper taped up on the wall and a 5 hour exposure IIRC.
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #58 on: August 08, 2018, 10:46:48 AM »
Thanks, Tank, for your explanation.

Dave, for your zoom lens at 300mm, use AUTO ISO, set the ISO at 200, set maximum ISO at 3200, set the minimum shutter speed at 1/250 seconds, turn on VR. Try it and see whether it works well for you, but I'm pretty sure you will see an improvement.

I'm building a basic set of descriptions for the novice. I'm adding them a single posts first to get them sense checked and then editing them back into the first post of the thread for the new reader. So you will see posts from me that bear no relationship to the flow of the thread :)

Sort of recognised that, Tank, I am finding that they trigger memory.  Maybe you could collect the final editions in a, "Tank's Tutorial" thread!
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #59 on: August 08, 2018, 11:08:42 AM »
Thanks, Tank, for your explanation.

Dave, for your zoom lens at 300mm, use AUTO ISO, set the ISO at 200, set maximum ISO at 3200, set the minimum shutter speed at 1/250 seconds, turn on VR. Try it and see whether it works well for you, but I'm pretty sure you will see an improvement.

I'm building a basic set of descriptions for the novice. I'm adding them a single posts first to get them sense checked and then editing them back into the first post of the thread for the new reader. So you will see posts from me that bear no relationship to the flow of the thread :)

That will be very useful. Looking forward to seeing the posts.