Author Topic: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.  (Read 15665 times)

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #75 on: August 08, 2018, 08:11:47 PM »
Nice one, Tank.

It also demos the idea of what, at first, may look like an out of balance composition - then the contrast hits and it looks good. Having hardly an artistic gene in my cells I do tend towards "technical" compositions - main subject in the centre and explicit. Apart from my stint in Cyprus most of my photography has been at work or in archaeology. With big gaps.
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jumbojak

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #76 on: August 09, 2018, 01:32:04 AM »
Here's an image from last night with the ISO set to 800, which is about what my camera could handle without losing all of the detail. The colors are off from what the scene actually looked like and there's a bit of camera shake from the slow shutter speed - it's interesting just how much the ferry moves the pier when it pulls in - but it was more an experiment with ISO than an attempt to take a photo of the truck or the ferry pulling in at night. I am working on getting the ferry as it pulls in but am having trouble with overexposure on the bright lights.

 

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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #77 on: August 09, 2018, 05:35:34 AM »
This is a good example of bokeh. It was taken with my f2.8 100mm Minolta macro lens on slide and then scanned with a film scanner.



To my eye this lens produces very pleasing bokeh. It can be a very subtle difference between different lenses and a matter of taste.

hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #78 on: August 09, 2018, 05:40:00 AM »
Nice one, Tank.

It also demos the idea of what, at first, may look like an out of balance composition - then the contrast hits and it looks good. Having hardly an artistic gene in my cells I do tend towards "technical" compositions - main subject in the centre and explicit. Apart from my stint in Cyprus most of my photography has been at work or in archaeology. With big gaps.

Dave, I think Tank has by accident, or more probably by design, applied the almost infallible rule of thirds to his composition. In this case it works well.

Tank

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #79 on: August 09, 2018, 06:27:14 AM »
Nice one, Tank.

It also demos the idea of what, at first, may look like an out of balance composition - then the contrast hits and it looks good. Having hardly an artistic gene in my cells I do tend towards "technical" compositions - main subject in the centre and explicit. Apart from my stint in Cyprus most of my photography has been at work or in archaeology. With big gaps.

Dave, I think Tank has by accident, or more probably by design, applied the almost infallible rule of thirds to his composition. In this case it works well.

:) I often use the rule of thirds.
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #80 on: August 09, 2018, 06:43:43 AM »
Nice one, Tank.

It also demos the idea of what, at first, may look like an out of balance composition - then the contrast hits and it looks good. Having hardly an artistic gene in my cells I do tend towards "technical" compositions - main subject in the centre and explicit. Apart from my stint in Cyprus most of my photography has been at work or in archaeology. With big gaps.

Dave, I think Tank has by accident, or more probably by design, applied the almost infallible rule of thirds to his composition. In this case it works well.

:) I often use the rule of thirds.

I admit I do as well! Nothing to be ashamed of I suppose.

Tank

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #81 on: August 09, 2018, 07:36:00 AM »
Nice one, Tank.

It also demos the idea of what, at first, may look like an out of balance composition - then the contrast hits and it looks good. Having hardly an artistic gene in my cells I do tend towards "technical" compositions - main subject in the centre and explicit. Apart from my stint in Cyprus most of my photography has been at work or in archaeology. With big gaps.

Dave, I think Tank has by accident, or more probably by design, applied the almost infallible rule of thirds to his composition. In this case it works well.

:) I often use the rule of thirds.

I admit I do as well! Nothing to be ashamed of I suppose.
Of course it isn't! We're standing on the shoulders of giants!
If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
“Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt.” ― Richard P. Feynman
'It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.' - Terry Pratchett
Remember, your inability to grasp science is not a valid argument against it.

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #82 on: August 09, 2018, 07:53:44 AM »
See, told you I was artistically inept! Heard of the "rule of thirds" but did not recognise it there! I recognise diagonals and "S" shapes though.

But when shooting I just, automatically, look for levelness and a clear view of a subject. In Cyprus (1963) I taught a colleague how to process film and printing. He had problems with that but, from his very first shot, he proved to have a far better "eye" than me. But then, he was Welsh and of an "artistic temperament", almost flambouyantly so with an excellent use of language!

OK, time to study and practice composition (again!). Start with some arranged still life possibly . . .
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Tank

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #83 on: August 09, 2018, 08:07:26 AM »
Secondary effect of the aperture, depth of field control.

The primary effect of the aperture is exposure control. However it has a creative secondary effect. It can be used to control which part of the image is in focus in front of the lens in relation to the position on the lens. This zone of focus is known as the 'depth of field'. It is sometimes called the 'depth of focus' but that is something else that goes on behind the lens.

The aperture you use is dependent on the effect you want in your final image. If you want everything to be in focus from as close as possible to the horizon then you use a smaller aperture (f16, f22). If you want your subject to appear against an out of focus background you use a larger aperture (f1.4, f2, f2.8)

To get the correct exposure you will have to adjust the shutter speed and/or ISO 'speed'.
If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
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'It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.' - Terry Pratchett
Remember, your inability to grasp science is not a valid argument against it.

Tank

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #84 on: August 09, 2018, 08:13:29 AM »
See, told you I was artistically inept! Heard of the "rule of thirds" but did not recognise it there! I recognise diagonals and "S" shapes though.

But when shooting I just, automatically, look for levelness and a clear view of a subject. In Cyprus (1963) I taught a colleague how to process film and printing. He had problems with that but, from his very first shot, he proved to have a far better "eye" than me. But then, he was Welsh and of an "artistic temperament", almost flambouyantly so with an excellent use of language!

OK, time to study and practice composition (again!). Start with some arranged still life possibly . . .

My younger daughter took up photography, did a degree in media studies and specialised in still photography. She is now a medical photographer, not an easy job. But she has a wonderfully creative 'eye' way better than mine. She uses a professional Canon and turns off all the automation, including exposure control, no autofocus, no nothing! As she puts it, 'I'm taking the photo, not some technician in Japan!' There are times it's difficult to put into words just how proud of her I am :)
If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
“Religion is a culture of faith; science is a culture of doubt.” ― Richard P. Feynman
'It is said that your life flashes before your eyes just before you die. That is true, it's called Life.' - Terry Pratchett
Remember, your inability to grasp science is not a valid argument against it.

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #85 on: August 09, 2018, 08:19:52 AM »
See, told you I was artistically inept! Heard of the "rule of thirds" but did not recognise it there! I recognise diagonals and "S" shapes though.

But when shooting I just, automatically, look for levelness and a clear view of a subject. In Cyprus (1963) I taught a colleague how to process film and printing. He had problems with that but, from his very first shot, he proved to have a far better "eye" than me. But then, he was Welsh and of an "artistic temperament", almost flambouyantly so with an excellent use of language!

OK, time to study and practice composition (again!). Start with some arranged still life possibly . . .

My younger daughter took up photography, did a degree in media studies and specialised in still photography. She is now a medical photographer, not an easy job. But she has a wonderfully creative 'eye' way better than mine. She uses a professional Canon and turns off all the automation, including exposure control, no autofocus, no nothing! As she puts it, 'I'm taking the photo, not some technician in Japan!' There are times it's difficult to put into words just how proud of her I am :)

And rightly so!
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Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #86 on: August 09, 2018, 08:46:07 AM »
Lovely description of the "rule of thirds" from the Wiki, applies to Tank's picture well:

Quote
Two distinct, equal lights, should never appear in the same picture : One should be principal, and the rest subordinate, both in dimension and degree: Unequal parts and gradations lead the attention easily from part to part, while parts of equal appearance hold it awkwardly suspended, as if unable to determine which of those parts is to be considered as the subordinate. "And to give the utmost force and solidity to your work, some part of the picture should be as light, and some as dark as possible: These two extremes are then to be harmonized and reconciled to each other." (Reynolds' Annot. on Du Fresnoy.)

John Thomas Smith, in 1797, who coined the phrase.
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #87 on: August 09, 2018, 09:07:53 AM »
Composition and other rules are very useful and my opinion is that we should be aware of them, but once they are internalized, we should not be slaves to them. It is OK to break them or ignore them. It's the old "Picasso could not draw" philistine statement, whereas nothing is further from the truth. He just chose to throw out the rules when it suited him.

Dave

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #88 on: August 09, 2018, 09:19:12 AM »
Composition and other rules are very useful and my opinion is that we should be aware of them, but once they are internalized, we should not be slaves to them. It is OK to break them or ignore them. It's the old "Picasso could not draw" philistine statement, whereas nothing is further from the truth. He just chose to throw out the rules when it suited him.

I agree, Hermes, but that practice, practice, practice is boring necessary for those of us without that natural eye to "get the habit"!

And I do much agree with the idea of not stucking rigidly to rules. Though Picasso does nothing for me, Durer is one of my favourite artists, but he could be quite "technical" at times to my eye. I loved the art lectures from the Open University when they used to be on TV.

[Oh for a pleassnt discussion in a pleasant place, a couple of drinks and good company, paradise! (appologies to Omary Khayyam)]
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hermes2015

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Re: Photography technical advice, questions, tips and techniques.
« Reply #89 on: August 09, 2018, 09:56:43 AM »
Composition and other rules are very useful and my opinion is that we should be aware of them, but once they are internalized, we should not be slaves to them. It is OK to break them or ignore them. It's the old "Picasso could not draw" philistine statement, whereas nothing is further from the truth. He just chose to throw out the rules when it suited him.

I agree, Hermes, but that practice, practice, practice is boring necessary for those of us without that natural eye to "get the habit"!

And I do much agree with the idea of not stucking rigidly to rules. Though Picasso does nothing for me, Durer is one of my favourite artists, but he could be quite "technical" at times to my eye. I loved the art lectures from the Open University when they used to be on TV.

[Oh for a pleassnt discussion in a pleasant place, a couple of drinks and good company, paradise! (appologies to Omary Khayyam)]

Some very academic paintings by Picasso when he was a child:




Sorry Tank, they don't really belong here.