Author Topic: A New Hydrolysis Catalyst  (Read 126 times)

Recusant

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A New Hydrolysis Catalyst
« on: July 01, 2018, 11:47:15 AM »
This may turn out to be a very important story, I think.

"Novel hybrid catalyst to split water discovered" | ScienceDaily

Quote
Researchers from the University of Houston and the California Institute of Technology have reported an inexpensive hybrid catalyst capable of splitting water to produce hydrogen, suitable for large-scale commercialization.

Most systems to split water into its components -- hydrogen and oxygen -- require two catalysts, one to spur a reaction to separate the hydrogen and a second to produce oxygen. The new catalyst, made of iron and dinickel phosphides on commercially available nickel foam, performs both functions.

Researchers said it has the potential to dramatically lower the amount of energy required to produce hydrogen from water while generating a high current density, a measure of hydrogen production. Lower energy requirements means the hydrogen could be produced at a lower cost.

[Continues . . .]

A not particularly exciting video:

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Dave

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Re: A New Hydrolysis Catalyst
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2018, 12:34:14 PM »
Hang on, I don't quite get this.

Normally you have the two electrodes in seperate "collection chamber" so that one collects the hydrogen to be drawn off and the other the oxygen. Looking at that article, and video, there is no seperation so the "atmosphere" in the vessel is surely a collection of H and O? Admitedly that can be recombined with some energy output (as well water.)

But they are talking hydrogen production for fuel cells here. I am missing, or misunderstanding, something here? A nice schematic would help!
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Recusant

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Re: A New Hydrolysis Catalyst
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2018, 01:00:26 PM »
The full paper is available for free:

"High-performance bifunctional porous non-noble metal phosphide catalyst for overall water splitting" | Nature

I surmise that the video is just part of the "proof of concept," and that in any serious use of the catalyst to produce hydrogen, appropriate procedures would be used.
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Dave

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Re: A New Hydrolysis Catalyst
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2018, 01:21:03 PM »
OK, so if the catalyst is connected to the supply +ve it produces one gas whilst the same catalyst attached to the -ve produces the other. So fsr not a lot different except for the current densities required. Presumably the catalyst is preserved, unlike the metal electrodes in the units currently made for small O-H torches for jewellery work etc.

Thus the commercial advantage; single electrode composition and relatively low energy consumption.
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