Author Topic: How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language  (Read 834 times)

Bluenose

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Re: How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language
« Reply #15 on: April 16, 2018, 12:08:47 PM »

As I said before my college research project covered the future of English and the way other cultures, ex-colonies included, changed it. Any chance of a translation, Bluenose?

A person from the 19th century would struggle a bit to understand everyday modern English.

Let's go to Broadie this arvo and grab a slab and some goon from the bottle-o.  Better stop at the servo on the way back too, the old man wants some bardies and scrubbies to take to the river tomorrow.

Let's go to Broadmeadows (a well known suburb of Melbourne) this afternoon and purchase a carton of beer and a cask of wine (aka château cardboard) from the liquor store.  On the way home, we should stop at the service station (petrol station) as my father would like some bardie-grubs and scrubworms (bait items, often sold at service stations) to use when he goes fishing tomorrow.

 :D

BTW, seeing as how its Monday, didjaavagoodweegend?
“The story so far:
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This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.”

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+++ Divide by cucumber error: please reinstall universe and reboot.  +++

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Dave

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Re: How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language
« Reply #16 on: April 16, 2018, 12:27:46 PM »

As I said before my college research project covered the future of English and the way other cultures, ex-colonies included, changed it. Any chance of a translation, Bluenose?

A person from the 19th century would struggle a bit to understand everyday modern English.

Let's go to Broadie this arvo and grab a slab and some goon from the bottle-o.  Better stop at the servo on the way back too, the old man wants some bardies and scrubbies to take to the river tomorrow.

Let's go to Broadmeadows (a well known suburb of Melbourne) this afternoon and purchase a carton of beer and a cask of wine (aka château cardboard) from the liquor store.  On the way home, we should stop at the service station (petrol station) as my father would like some bardie-grubs and scrubworms (bait items, often sold at service stations) to use when he goes fishing tomorrow.

 :D

BTW, seeing as how its Monday, didjaavagoodweegend?

The last bit is at least decypherable written down, heard it might require a long moment of thought!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74

Bluenose

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Re: How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language
« Reply #17 on: April 16, 2018, 12:31:03 PM »

As I said before my college research project covered the future of English and the way other cultures, ex-colonies included, changed it. Any chance of a translation, Bluenose?

A person from the 19th century would struggle a bit to understand everyday modern English.

Let's go to Broadie this arvo and grab a slab and some goon from the bottle-o.  Better stop at the servo on the way back too, the old man wants some bardies and scrubbies to take to the river tomorrow.

Let's go to Broadmeadows (a well known suburb of Melbourne) this afternoon and purchase a carton of beer and a cask of wine (aka château cardboard) from the liquor store.  On the way home, we should stop at the service station (petrol station) as my father would like some bardie-grubs and scrubworms (bait items, often sold at service stations) to use when he goes fishing tomorrow.

 :D

BTW, seeing as how its Monday, didjaavagoodweegend?

The last bit is at least decypherable written down, heard it might require a long moment of thought!

Actually, spoken it would probably more likely to be djavagoodweegend?  LOL
“The story so far:
In the beginning the Universe was created.
This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.”

― Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

+++ Divide by cucumber error: please reinstall universe and reboot.  +++

GNU Terry Pratchett

Dave

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Re: How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language
« Reply #18 on: April 16, 2018, 01:40:53 PM »

As I said before my college research project covered the future of English and the way other cultures, ex-colonies included, changed it. Any chance of a translation, Bluenose?

A person from the 19th century would struggle a bit to understand everyday modern English.

Let's go to Broadie this arvo and grab a slab and some goon from the bottle-o.  Better stop at the servo on the way back too, the old man wants some bardies and scrubbies to take to the river tomorrow.

Let's go to Broadmeadows (a well known suburb of Melbourne) this afternoon and purchase a carton of beer and a cask of wine (aka château cardboard) from the liquor store.  On the way home, we should stop at the service station (petrol station) as my father would like some bardie-grubs and scrubworms (bait items, often sold at service stations) to use when he goes fishing tomorrow.

 :D

BTW, seeing as how its Monday, didjaavagoodweegend?

The last bit is at least decypherable written down, heard it might require a long moment of thought!

Actually, spoken it would probably more likely to be djavagoodweegend?  LOL

When I say it it's not actually much different ftom what I might say in the Sowfeast London accent of my childhood.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74

Old Seer

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Re: How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language
« Reply #19 on: April 16, 2018, 03:27:04 PM »
It may not be due to language. Language may be influenced by morals. It also may be that different societies have different levels of morals.

From Wikipedia.
Morality (from Latin: mōrālis, lit. 'manner, character, proper behavior') is the differentiation of intentions, decisions and actions between those that are distinguished as proper and those that are improper.[1] Morality can be a body of standards or principles derived from a code of conduct from a particular philosophy, religion or culture, or it can derive from a standard that a person believes should be universal.[2] Morality may also be specifically synonymous with "goodness" or "rightness".

Moral philosophy includes moral ontology, which is the origin of morals; and moral epistemology, which is the knowledge of morals. Different systems of expressing morality have been proposed, including deontological ethical systems which adhere to a set of established rules, and normative ethical systems which consider the merits of actions themselves. An example of normative ethical philosophy is the Golden Rule, which states that: "One should treat others as one would like others to treat oneself."[3]

This I think is were we get into troubles. Who decides what rightness is. Would it not be then that a population's morals are set in the characters of the person(s) who decide what's right or wrong behavior. That means then, that a population is made according to the mandates of the operators. The problem with this is--- are the deciders moral and who keeps them in check. They can skew morals to benefit their preferred members in their constructed society. It would seem then that wrongness is what would be harmful to others and rightness would be what is helpful or harmless. That would mean that a society isn't more or less right or wrong then what leaders dictate.
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Bad Penny II

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Re: How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language
« Reply #20 on: April 17, 2018, 10:08:19 AM »
Numbers are a large part of my language, I'm inclined to put a dollar values on things.
Some people may think it crass to put a value on human life but it seems sensible to me.
Should millions be spent to save a newborn who will probably never thrive?
Or should the millions be directed to early childhood education?
You can compromise but not have all of both, these be pennies not magic pudding.
Numbers are amoral?  I could put a price on sentiment and factor it in if I must.

Certainty disturbs me


Dave

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Re: How Morality Changes in a Foreign Language
« Reply #21 on: April 17, 2018, 10:35:49 AM »
Quote
It may not be due to language. Language may be influenced by morals. It also may be that different societies have different levels of morals.

Maybe it's a feedback loop, OS?

Evolution (of custom and language) due to environment (of any variety) forms mindset, social value system and behaviour.

Religion codifies and reinforces selected aspects.

Historical power plays cause schizms, 

Science and technology offer alternative paradigms.

All of which, of course, is a socio-moral environmental continuum that causes further evolution of . . .

Certain things, like incest, remain constant because they are anti-survival in racial terms.

Politics also figure but they are a product of combinations of the above.

Remember "O tempora, o mores!" ? The same cry has probably been made since Hom sap acheived abstract thought!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74