Author Topic: Women in science and technology  (Read 3682 times)

Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #30 on: October 03, 2018, 03:50:40 PM »
That makes me both so happy and sad at the same time. Why did it take another 55 years for a woman to get the recognition?

Imagine just how many Jocelyn Bells there are out there. :(
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Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #31 on: October 03, 2018, 11:52:36 PM »
^ seconded

Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #32 on: October 23, 2018, 10:04:30 PM »
An amazing woman with an amazing career in earth science who now lives in a mud hut near the Masaii Mara as the chief's wife, erm, by accident.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0000t5z
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #33 on: February 01, 2019, 12:57:25 PM »
Beyond Curie

Quote
Beyond Curie is a design project that highlights badass women in science, technology, engineering + mathematics.
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Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #34 on: March 19, 2019, 01:55:13 AM »
There are legions more brilliant women who deserve recognition for their contributions to science, sociology, and judicial exceptionalism.

Isolated example: Refer to an article in February Scientific American.  Doris Y Tsao is a professor of biology at California Institute of Technology (Cal Tech).  Her research into brain regions that process faces reveal deep insights into the neural mechanisms of vision. It appears that there is an isolated region of the brain that is exclusively in charge of recognizing faces. The article uses some big words like inferotemporel cortex and anterior medial patch any other words that Silver will understand . Fascinating stuff by a woman who is a leading edge scientist.