Author Topic: Women in science and technology  (Read 838 times)

Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2018, 08:26:17 PM »
Academia-net.org is a data base containing profiles of 2,400 outstanding women researchers from all disciplines.

  Our XSP just might one day become one of the women in the list.

Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2018, 09:40:12 PM »
Popping back 1600 odd years would place us back in the time of Hypatia of Alexandria - mathematician and astrononer and outstanding teacher. And possibly killed on the covert orders of the xtian archbishop of the time.

BBC Radio 4's "Science stories" gave a flavour of the story, as usual not founded on many facts but still interesting.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b89nq4

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypatia
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #17 on: July 04, 2018, 11:52:22 PM »
Cepheids are variable stars that change their luminescence periodically. Some times every earth day.  In 1912 Henrietta Leavitt realized that the predictability of the cepheids could enable her to calculate the distance to the star and other far off objects.  Using the relation now known as Leavitts Law, she determined that the brightness of the {cepheid} variables function as a remarkable celestial time piece.

Raise you glass to Ms Leavitt. In 1912 the social norm was that she was supposed to be cooking dinner, washing, the clothes, and changing the babies diaper.  She excelled in spite of the stuffy, misdirected, foolish  norm that she had to live with.