Author Topic: Women in science and technology  (Read 1222 times)

Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2018, 08:26:17 PM »
Academia-net.org is a data base containing profiles of 2,400 outstanding women researchers from all disciplines.

  Our XSP just might one day become one of the women in the list.

Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2018, 09:40:12 PM »
Popping back 1600 odd years would place us back in the time of Hypatia of Alexandria - mathematician and astrononer and outstanding teacher. And possibly killed on the covert orders of the xtian archbishop of the time.

BBC Radio 4's "Science stories" gave a flavour of the story, as usual not founded on many facts but still interesting.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0b89nq4

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypatia
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Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #17 on: July 04, 2018, 11:52:22 PM »
Cepheids are variable stars that change their luminescence periodically. Some times every earth day.  In 1912 Henrietta Leavitt realized that the predictability of the cepheids could enable her to calculate the distance to the star and other far off objects.  Using the relation now known as Leavitts Law, she determined that the brightness of the {cepheid} variables function as a remarkable celestial time piece.

Raise you glass to Ms Leavitt. In 1912 the social norm was that she was supposed to be cooking dinner, washing, the clothes, and changing the babies diaper.  She excelled in spite of the stuffy, misdirected, foolish  norm that she had to live with.

Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2018, 04:59:05 PM »
There is a bew body promoting women in STEM fields. Seems they expected a few hundred responses to an open letter and got about 20 000!

I am all for this and have put my money where my mouth (er, finger?) is to the tune of $10.

https://500womenscientists.org/who-we-are/

Gonna join up, Silver? Get networking?

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Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2018, 07:06:29 AM »
Then there is military science and tactics (MST)  have a look at these women.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RJNOT4RJrQ

Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #20 on: August 05, 2018, 08:54:46 AM »
Then there is military science and tactics (MST)  have a look at these women.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RJNOT4RJrQ

That just looked like an excuse to show some beautiful women in uniform, assuming they were all genuinely members of the wrmed forces.. More sexism than science?
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Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #21 on: August 05, 2018, 09:02:43 PM »
Right Dave, the intent was to feature attractive women.  It is OK for women to be pretty even if they are scientists or soldiers with guns. Females of almost any variety can be the fiercest of fighters.   

Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #22 on: August 05, 2018, 09:27:36 PM »
Right Dave, the intent was to feature attractive women.  It is OK for women to be pretty even if they are scientists or soldiers with guns. Females of almost any variety can be the fiercest of fighters.

I have only personally observed the full fighting fury of the female in the defence of kids and in fighting off another woman making a play for their man! When I was in the RAF there were very few female combatants anywhere. Yes, I imagine there are some very good female warriors around, why not! I saw one interview with a female Kurdish general (in charge of the female fighters of course) who looked very familiar with the Kalishnikov she was cleaning at the same time.

However, being fussy, this thread was "women in science and tech", not in the infantry or even fighter aircraft. Though I have the same respect for those that I have for their male colleagues. I am a bit concerned about the motives behind that video, though I am happy to see genuine examples where women, beautiful or not, are genuinely doing a scientifuc or technical job in the armed forces.

I admit to being a bit of a feminist, just a little bit . . .
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Icarus

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #23 on: August 11, 2018, 01:07:22 AM »
If you are into the arguments about the five devastation periods of the earth, this is worth a read.  Warning: It is a bit long.  It is about a paleontologist that argues against the asteroid impact theory.  She is a helluva lady scientist.  Her name Gerta Keller causes anger for some of the impact believers.  In either case the dinosaurs were wiped out. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/09/dinosaur-extinction-debate/565769/

Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #24 on: August 11, 2018, 07:53:55 AM »
If you are into the arguments about the five devastation periods of the earth, this is worth a read.  Warning: It is a bit long.  It is about a paleontologist that argues against the asteroid impact theory.  She is a helluva lady scientist.  Her name Gerta Keller causes anger for some of the impact believers.  In either case the dinosaurs were wiped out. https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/09/dinosaur-extinction-debate/565769/

I 'll read in detail later, but in an esrly morning scan of it as soon as I saw they were in India I thought, "Decsn Traps".

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Dave

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #25 on: September 06, 2018, 12:37:09 PM »
Jocelyn Bell Burnell has been awarded the "Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics [... ] for fundamental contributions to the discovery of pulsars, and a lifetime of inspiring leadership in the scientific community."

And what is this eminent lady going to do with the $3 000 000 prize? Keep up the good work and use it to promote women and ethnic minorities in physics.

Every more reason for my admiration of this lady.

Quote
Jocelyn Bell Burnell wins $3 million prize for discovering pulsars
The astronomer was famously excluded from the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physics.

When the Nobel Prizes roll around each year, inevitably there is chatter not just about who will win, but about those in the past who should have won, but didn't, particularly women scientists. Jocelyn Bell Burnell, who discovered pulsars in the 1960s, is one of the names most commonly invoked. Now 75, she's just been awarded something arguably better: a $3 million Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics.

Originally founded in 2012, the Breakthrough Prizes are intended to be the "Oscars of Science." In addition to the regular awards, the selection committee is also free to award a Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics any time it wishes, and the honor need not be for recent discoveries. Bell Burnell is being honored "for fundamental contributions to the discovery of pulsars, and a lifetime of inspiring leadership in the scientific community."

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/09/jocelyn-bell-burnell-wins-3-million-prize-for-discovering-pulsars/
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #26 on: September 06, 2018, 02:29:55 PM »
There is a bew body promoting women in STEM fields. Seems they expected a few hundred responses to an open letter and got about 20 000!

I am all for this and have put my money where my mouth (er, finger?) is to the tune of $10.

https://500womenscientists.org/who-we-are/

Gonna join up, Silver? Get networking?

Oh that's cool. I'm going to check that out.
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


xSilverPhinx

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Re: Women in science and technology
« Reply #27 on: September 06, 2018, 02:30:29 PM »
Jocelyn Bell Burnell has been awarded the "Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics [... ] for fundamental contributions to the discovery of pulsars, and a lifetime of inspiring leadership in the scientific community."

And what is this eminent lady going to do with the $3 000 000 prize? Keep up the good work and use it to promote women and ethnic minorities in physics.

Every more reason for my admiration of this lady.

Quote
Jocelyn Bell Burnell wins $3 million prize for discovering pulsars
The astronomer was famously excluded from the 1974 Nobel Prize in Physics.

When the Nobel Prizes roll around each year, inevitably there is chatter not just about who will win, but about those in the past who should have won, but didn't, particularly women scientists. Jocelyn Bell Burnell, who discovered pulsars in the 1960s, is one of the names most commonly invoked. Now 75, she's just been awarded something arguably better: a $3 million Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics.

Originally founded in 2012, the Breakthrough Prizes are intended to be the "Oscars of Science." In addition to the regular awards, the selection committee is also free to award a Special Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics any time it wishes, and the honor need not be for recent discoveries. Bell Burnell is being honored "for fundamental contributions to the discovery of pulsars, and a lifetime of inspiring leadership in the scientific community."

https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/09/jocelyn-bell-burnell-wins-3-million-prize-for-discovering-pulsars/

Well deserved.
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.