Author Topic: Workshop and fixit stuff  (Read 11633 times)

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #390 on: September 06, 2018, 06:13:42 PM »
As mentioned in the Grumpy thread I soaked the internals of my blender in soup 'cos I forgot to put a seal in.

Two point screwdriver needed to get the case open, mine was too big. Up into attic to get the craft tool and a mini cutting disc. Modified screwdriver works. Special tool needed to get motor out of case (damn!), can't make one.

Washed whole thing in (damn near) demineralised water (out of the dehumidifier tank), swung it about a bit,  and then with 100ml of iso-propanol squirted from a syringe. It is now drying in a warm oven, at about 35C, for rest of evening.

Will let you know whether it works or blows up when I power it up.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

hermes2015

  • Not Defeated by the Dark Night of the Soul
  • ****
  • Posts: 1613
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #391 on: September 06, 2018, 06:28:07 PM »
Will let you know whether it works or blows up when I power it up.

My thoughts and prayers are with you.

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #392 on: September 06, 2018, 06:41:04 PM »
Will let you know whether it works or blows up when I power it up.

My thoughts and prayers are with you.

Thank you, Hermes.

So will rubber gloves and goggles!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

jumbojak

  • Chandler's Pale Cock Slurper
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5462
  • The Iconic Iconoclast
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #393 on: September 09, 2018, 02:03:59 PM »
I gotta get me one of these...

 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #394 on: September 09, 2018, 06:57:04 PM »
^

I remember the big Town radial drill we had at my last workplace, put twelve 50mm holes in a 1.5m diameter, 50mm thick flange in minutes. Even li'l ol' me could swing it around and wind it along.Very useful if you have really heavy jobs to do, and the crane to load the work pieces!

There was nearly a riot when the company said they were going to scrap it! It was older than the building and still doing a good job.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #395 on: September 12, 2018, 05:08:21 PM »
JJ, the X-Y table looks well made at first sight, the slides and base are aluminium but the ends for the spindles are plastic, but msy have metal inserts. It was a bit sloppy and I had to tighten up the friction adjusters. Still not brilliant.and needs very, very slow action even on wood using a high bit speed and well bolted down.

The scales are stuck on tapes that tend to peel. They also seem to be stuck on wrong end first and I do not trust them at all! The handle cannot be "zeroed" to a point on the workpiece. There is a printed-on-metal scale on the X slide that can be moved from side to sude, it has no locking device, vibration might shift it. The screws seem to be M8 x 1.5 though it measures at 7.62mm in diameter (familiar number!). About 1/4 turn of backlash.

But, for £27 what does one expect? It will do its new job adequately.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01MU0ZFYF/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1


Or £20

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07BF9DGKV/ref=sspa_dk_detail_0?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07BF9DGKV&pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_p=b0023f58-ff8d-4694-adc6-43892d3a8107&pf_rd_r=KJ79BQ9HESCEEB2QE69N&pd_rd_wg=h4n1I&pf_rd_s=desktop-dp-sims&pf_rd_t=40701&pd_rd_w=BFezI&pf_rd_i=desktop-dp-sims&pd_rd_r=b8bd1df0-b6a9-11e8-99c8-33d23753c678

Better looking job but bigger price

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07GR51DN3/ref=sspa_dk_detail_5?psc=1&pd_rd_i=B07GR51DN3

Regarding a turntable; needs something light and flat/thin really, not going to take significant weight, <<1kg, and does not need a scale. Have ideas.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2018, 05:48:19 PM by Dave »
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

jumbojak

  • Chandler's Pale Cock Slurper
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5462
  • The Iconic Iconoclast
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #396 on: September 12, 2018, 08:14:41 PM »
I think I'll hold off on that style of table then. My thinking was that it'd be sufficient for hole alignment on a small press but a cross slide vise might be a better allocation of resources.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #397 on: September 14, 2018, 09:33:36 AM »
I am in one if those positions where I have to, sort of, make the tool to make the tool to do the job! Though, if I can find a certain thing, the first bit might get missed.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #398 on: September 16, 2018, 03:57:16 PM »
quote author=jumbojak link=topic=5179.msg379938#msg379938 date=1537104517]
I'd like to see that chisel. I have an old caulking iron that comes in handy for things like that. Reground to a single bevel the offset works nicely.
[/quote]

This is it, about 200mm long, there is a "hook" there as well for final scraping. It not only took the spatter off but took metal out of the corners of the gap where the weld had "leaked" through, more like the action of an engraver. Used a 4oz hammer very carefully.



Writing this a memory comes from distant childhood (sure sign of senility :) ). A friend's father made doll's house furniture and carved miniature statuary (no 3D printers in the 1950s), he made knives and chisels from hacksaw blades (no modelling tools being made in those days). He had a home made treadle grindstone made from an old sewing machine.  Also certainly the inspiration for this.

Come to think of it I seem to remember plans for turning those old machines into small wood turning lathes.

Speaking of which, I discovered today that the keyless chuck I have is a pefect fit in the  clamp-on horizontal drill stand. That can take a centre, running if I can find a non-taper one. Get another stand for the drill, plus a stiff piece of something stiff to clamp them to, and I have the makings of a wood lathe.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

jumbojak

  • Chandler's Pale Cock Slurper
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5462
  • The Iconic Iconoclast
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #399 on: September 16, 2018, 04:19:16 PM »
Chisel from a saw blade. Interesting.

I remember hearing that the first Jo blocks were made using Johanssons wife's sewing machine after it had been suitably modified to serve as a lapper.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #400 on: September 16, 2018, 04:39:05 PM »
Chisel from a saw blade. Interesting.

I remember hearing that the first Jo blocks were made using Johanssons wife's sewing machine after it had been suitably modified to serve as a lapper.

Had to check on "Jo blocks", but gauge blocks and slips I know off. What did he use to check their accuracy? Betcha its done with laser wavelengths these days. There is a uni I would like to visit that specialises in atom level dimensioning research - granite blocks the size of houses and huge girders seem to proliferate in their labs from pictures.

Those old treadle sewing machines turned into many home workshop devices I would guess.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

jumbojak

  • Chandler's Pale Cock Slurper
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5462
  • The Iconic Iconoclast
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #401 on: September 16, 2018, 06:52:36 PM »
That's a good question that I couldn't find an answer to. I mean, it's simple enough to get an accurate flat surface but getting it flat and to a particular thickness is another matter when starting in a primitive metrological condition. I wonder when optical comparators came into use...

What I find most fascinating about the really big metrology labs is the effort put into thermostats. They say that whoever has the best thermostat wins and some of those hvac systems are really, really cool.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #402 on: September 16, 2018, 08:21:24 PM »
That's a good question that I couldn't find an answer to. I mean, it's simple enough to get an accurate flat surface but getting it flat and to a particular thickness is another matter when starting in a primitive metrological condition. I wonder when optical comparators came into use...

What I find most fascinating about the really big metrology labs is the effort put into thermostats. They say that whoever has the best thermostat wins and some of those hvac systems are really, really cool.

Not hot stuff then?

In a less critical way I am familiar with the effects of temperature from my last job. Since we sold our flow meters as + - 1% up to 1m diameter the effects of the temperature on the insulating liner was critical, it had to be measured to better than 0.1%. Fun job measuring that at pressure whilst allowing for the expansion of the medium . . . The liner was moulded in on the smaller sizes but there were always gaps between it and the pipe inner surface. So they were vacuum filled with epoxy. So, on temp rise the liner and filler both expanded and reduced the measuring bore. Forgot how many filler mixes we tried as test pieces and how many tubes we put through their paces, constantly trying to find a reliable mix that could be compensated for more and more reliably in the processor.

And, of course, I had to find or design better, more constant and reliable test rigs and routines and test those by the most fundamental means we could afford. Sometimes meant shipping my delicate babies of to national calibration/test labs. Mother hens had nothing on me when designing transit crates!

See how I got addicted to solving technical problems?
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

jumbojak

  • Chandler's Pale Cock Slurper
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5462
  • The Iconic Iconoclast
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #403 on: September 16, 2018, 11:45:22 PM »
 Here's what I was working on today:



My $15 secondhand grinder isn't the greatest. It's noisy, needs a kickstart, and is seriously underpowered, but it's mine and I do use it. The biggest problem is that dinky little tool rest. It's too small to be useful, so I thought I'd upgrade it.



This is what I'm making the new tool rest out of. It's two six inch chunks of 3/16" by 3" flat bar. The plan is to drill one to 1/2" and then saw and file away a snug fitting square opening to surround the wheel, butt weld the two together, and then devise an attachment point.



The fit is just about what I was looking for. It's close enough on all sides to provide an added safety factor and still leave a bit of room. The cutout is square enough for my liking as well.

I'm debating adding a screw jack once it's all together for a bit more stability but we'll have to see how steady it is once it's all together. I'm also debating whether to just do a layout with the old rest rather than fabricate a new mount.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7081
  • Gender: Male
Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #404 on: September 22, 2018, 05:02:03 PM »
"There are holes in my head where the skills leak out . . ."
(Apologies to Spike Milligan: https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/there-are-holes-in-the-sky/ )

Having taken my small plane to pieces to sharpen the blade I wondered why it was not working properly. Tried for ages to adjust it but finally stripped it again.

I had put the blade in upside down.

But I did get my bench hook finished and a steel strip as a routing guide fitted to my bench top. Now holes needed to use it as a jig-saw guide, parallel and 45o

I bought some building sort of strip, with staggered holes, about 27mm wide, 2mm thick and a meter ĺong and only £2.37 - thoght it might be useful. It is! By pure accident the pitch is exactlý that of the matrix of holes on the work top!

I never do big stuff, sheet material will fit under the strip, cut line at edge, and a router bit with a roller that follows the strip will be used. Another position that puts the jigsaw blade right on the edge is the next job.

Picture below is of the hook and strip in position, using stops in two matrix holes to prevent the hook sliding. I decided not to fix the drill stand, quite secure with a single clamp that enables its position to be altered, rotated or even hanging off the edge. Or quickly removed.

Pic is by the phone, held above mý head, could not get it steady - this is sixth attempt and best of the bunch!



Oh, the scouring pad on the drill base is ideal for cleaning swarf etc off the work surface without scratching.  I love the scewdriver, it has an internal rotating  magazine that takes 10 normal bits and a top slides that moves them in and out of the hex drive. Won't take a 10mm socket or the hex to 1/4" adapter though . . .

Later: When I get more confident with the router I will rebate the top to set that strip in flush, leave it there and add another on top as a hold down. But I have to countersink the holes and use several smaller screws that end up sub-flush.  I hope they still have those strips in stock somewhere near that price!
« Last Edit: September 22, 2018, 06:37:24 PM by Dave »
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.