Author Topic: Art and design, how does it work?  (Read 448 times)

hermes2015

  • Not Defeated by the Dark Night of the Soul
  • ****
  • Posts: 1626
  • Gender: Male
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #15 on: September 22, 2018, 05:28:35 AM »
In our pride, even hubris, we humans used to differentiate ourselves from other species by describing ourselves as "tool users," until we saw that birds and sea-otters - as well as chimps - also use tools. So we became "tool makers," until . . .

But there does seem to be something very fundamental in humans that attracts them to create tools, and in essence 'tools' here includes cars, microwave cookers, mathematical tables, mnenomics, possibly even clothes etc, etc etc. They are artifacts created, or modified (in form or application), to achieve something beyound our natural 'built-in' abilities. Though one might argue about mnemonics, mental constructs, there.

After a long time of watching Youtube videos, and considering my own behaviour, I have come to the conclusion that there is a human subculture where obtaining, collecting or using tools, is a strong trait. But, far more important than actually using those tools to make everyday, or even artistic, objects is using them in the creation of new tools!  These are then used to create . . . Yeah, even more tools.

To those with this infliction the wooden handle of an old saw can have as much grace and beauty as a Michaelangelo or Rodin piece. The sound of a perfectly sharpened plane cutting a long shaving from the wood as evocative as the wind in the trees. The ergodynamics and ergonomics involved, if good, satisfy the 'soul'. If bad they stimulate the analytical centres and the desire to improve things.

Tools have their own aesthetics.


https://www.ergonomics4schools.com/lzone/aesthetics.htm

Well said, Dave. My feelings exactly.
 :boaterhat:

Dark Lightning

  • Doesn't Believe in Mother Goose
  • *
  • Posts: 189
  • Gender: Male
  • Curmudgeon
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #16 on: September 22, 2018, 03:30:26 PM »
Yo, Dave, that's what it feels like with a carving tool, as well. Not that different from a plane, when you get down to basics.

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7082
  • Gender: Male
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #17 on: September 22, 2018, 03:38:10 PM »


It strikes me there are missing dimensions in the sbove - what of observation of need, analysis, inspiration and just sitting and staring, waiting for the work to 'say' something, suggest its own solutions (seemingly)?

And then I forgot "creativity"!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Don't Pray in My School, and I Won't Think in Your Church
  • *****
  • Posts: 7082
  • Gender: Male
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #18 on: September 22, 2018, 03:45:26 PM »
Yo, Dave, that's what it feels like with a carving tool, as well. Not that different from a plane, when you get down to basics.

Yes, I have not tried carving for decades but had a old set of tools with "ball ended" handles that just fitted my palms perfectly and a "shoulder" in just the right place for my thumb and finger length. Bit like big metal engraving tools and I think designed for cutting printing blocks. Living in bed sitters was no was not the style for tool lovers, sold or gave away too much.

I like that "spoon chisel" in that video 3 or 4 months ago.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

Icarus

  • The wise one.
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5208
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2018, 12:39:08 AM »
Some of us are tool freaks Dave. Count me among them.  I have experience as a tool and die maker and I am at my best moods when making things, including tools for making things. 

My most recent project was making what the old time American boat builders called a "slick".  It is a large, in my case, piece of truck spring, suitably hardened and tempered.. It is fashioned into a blade like a chisel.  It would weigh about two and a half pounds and be fitted with a handle some 24 inches long.  Properly sharpened it is one of the most precise of cutting tools because of its' sheer weight and the long handle.  It appears to be a clumsy tool to the uninitiated but it is a joy to use by someone who has an appreciation for it.  I can take a gossamer thin peel from a piece of wood with great precision. It is useful as a rabbeting tool as well.  That is not the only tools that I have made, actually many more, not of the cutting variety. 

jumbojak

  • Chandler's Pale Cock Slurper
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5473
  • The Iconic Iconoclast
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #20 on: October 08, 2018, 02:24:00 AM »


It strikes me there are missing dimensions in the sbove - what of observation of need, analysis, inspiration and just sitting and staring, waiting for the work to 'say' something, suggest its own solutions (seemingly)?

And then I forgot "creativity"!

And simplicity. Things should be fit to purpose if well designed and better design can often mean gradual, incremental improvements that sometimes have to take a step back to a simpler way of doing things.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dark Lightning

  • Doesn't Believe in Mother Goose
  • *
  • Posts: 189
  • Gender: Male
  • Curmudgeon
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #21 on: October 09, 2018, 01:59:17 AM »
Some of us are tool freaks Dave. Count me among them.  I have experience as a tool and die maker and I am at my best moods when making things, including tools for making things. 

My most recent project was making what the old time American boat builders called a "slick".  It is a large, in my case, piece of truck spring, suitably hardened and tempered.. It is fashioned into a blade like a chisel.  It would weigh about two and a half pounds and be fitted with a handle some 24 inches long.  Properly sharpened it is one of the most precise of cutting tools because of its' sheer weight and the long handle.  It appears to be a clumsy tool to the uninitiated but it is a joy to use by someone who has an appreciation for it.  I can take a gossamer thin peel from a piece of wood with great precision. It is useful as a rabbeting tool as well.  That is not the only tools that I have made, actually many more, not of the cutting variety.

Do tell! I'd like to see an example. I do a lot of wood working and carving. If there is something that potentially works better than my planes, I'd be seriously interested! Carpenters were a big deal on a wooden ship. Those guys had to make them take on as little water as possible, for obvious reasons.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2018, 02:25:11 AM by Dark Lightning »

Icarus

  • The wise one.
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5208
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2018, 01:25:56 AM »
DL the slick is not a replacement for the plane.  It is capable of planing but its main use is for doing delicate adjustment ( shaping, trimming, rabbeting) to a wooden part. The better control of the monster tool is simple because it is heavier and has a long handle.  The blade is slightly curved the way a section of vehicle leaf spring will be. the gives the blade some heel clearance when pushing it along.  The long handle lets the blade remain more or less at the same cutting angle if that is what the cut needs but it also lets you change cutting angle as desired during the cut.   Think of the slick as a humongous chisel with steadier control.   You can find examples on E bay.

The old time shipwrights were remarkably skillful with such tools an an adze. An Adze is something like a potato rake but larger heavier and waaay sharper.  The sideways blade was used to trim large timbers to whatever shape the shipwright intended.  The drill is to straddle the large timber, walk backwards while pulling the adze, either in planing action or stroking to whittle off whatever needed to be removed.  The sideways super axe had the ability to deliver rather precise work in the hands of a skilled user.  I fear that those master craftsmen are long gone.  Nowadays  we would use a chainsaw on a track or power plane to shape that huge timber.  We can do it faster but not nearly as elegantly.

Dark Lightning

  • Doesn't Believe in Mother Goose
  • *
  • Posts: 189
  • Gender: Male
  • Curmudgeon
Re: Art and design, how does it work?
« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2018, 03:47:43 AM »
Just saw this. I'm like a fly in a whirlwind on the internet, I go all over the place, but just saw this. Hmm, interesting. You are right, there are likely very few people who have this knowledge and/or skill. At my old job, I had machinists using numerically controlled machines to make my stuff, when I did design work.