Author Topic: Not science as such but . . .  (Read 3565 times)

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #30 on: April 14, 2018, 03:24:43 PM »
:grin:

I know the purpose of jargon and its almost essential use in textbooks - be half as long again in oure lay-tslk! But it can ge obscure and fonfusing, like "myocardial infarct" "instead of "death of heart muscle" of "heart attack" (the latter is not very specific, several conditions can "attsck" the heart). My favourite is "heart failure" - don't take it too literally, medically it is relative rather than absolute! But also shorter than "cardiac output function insufficiency" or even "systolic impairment" and, anyway, those are the result rather than the cause.

But in some fields the jargon is overblown and, unnecesssrily, takes up more space than "lay speak" - managed to write an almost jargon free sociology paper ('cos I knew I did not need a pass in that) in my pre-uni college finals. Passed anyway. Often eonder if the medical profession chose Greek and Latin to keep their esoteric knowledge priviledged.

I think the fact that they borrowed heavily from Latin and Greek makes it easier! :grin: Biology did this too. :smilenod: You only have to memorise the meanings of the prefixes and suffixes and when you come across a new word there's a good chance you'll have an idea as to what it means. Either that or try and draw associations.
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Icarus

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #31 on: May 25, 2018, 09:53:11 PM »
A snippet about one of our long gone heroes..........https://www.brainpickings.org/2018/05/23/pythagoras-olympic-games/

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #32 on: May 26, 2018, 04:57:09 AM »
A snippet about one of our long gone heroes..........https://www.brainpickings.org/2018/05/23/pythagoras-olympic-games/

Yeah, great guy! Add his more throretical and philosophical approach to the more practical one of Archimedes (who mudt hsve been influenced by Pythagoras) and ancient Greeks were obviously clever people. They went on to create the golden ages of Indian and then Islamic sciences and maths - long before us Europeans stopped counting on our fingers and toes. Though things like Stonehenge took a lot of that kind of thinking and planning. . .

If you want to watch the BBC Horizon video on  the solving of Fermatt's Last Theorem:

https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x223gx8
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Icarus

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2018, 01:32:55 AM »
I have a whole book that explores Fermats' theorem somewhere around my stack of books.  Fermat was either a math genius or a Hustler who meant to mess with our heads. He may also have been an arrogant bastard who was certain that there is no equality solution to....A^n + B^n =  C^n......Cool dude nevertheless.  ................... N>2


Icarus

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #34 on: July 04, 2018, 11:38:11 PM »
Not sure where to put this or whether to post it at all.  AI is beginning to have some far out applications.  https://medium.com/forbes/in-case-you-are-wondering-sex-with-robots-may-not-be-healthy-b591d84b60f2

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #35 on: July 05, 2018, 04:27:48 AM »
Not sure where to put this or whether to post it at all.  AI is beginning to have some far out applications.  https://medium.com/forbes/in-case-you-are-wondering-sex-with-robots-may-not-be-healthy-b591d84b60f2
I have seen other items on the potential psychological problems if sexbots, especially the "normalisation" of abuse, and child abuse in particular. This adds a new dimension to pornography, and its effects, that even blow-up dolls does not achieve.
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Bad Penny II

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #36 on: July 05, 2018, 02:08:59 PM »
Not sure where to put this or whether to post it at all.  AI is beginning to have some far out applications.  https://medium.com/forbes/in-case-you-are-wondering-sex-with-robots-may-not-be-healthy-b591d84b60f2

I couldn't read it as I'm not a Medium member, whatever increment those are.
You could perhaps quote the gist of it.

I wonder how it will/could/would play out, having acceptable artificial woman.
I think maybe, much of the hate the woman haters have is 'cause of denial of access, thwarted desire.
Now we have NEW WOMEN, indistinguishable from real butter woman.
Will there be less hating?
Some of the haters might have weird mothers.
Ye I suppose.
Or got caught looking at its sister through the bathroom window.
Ye well he won't have to do that anymore, he'll get a bot on his 12th birthday.

Woman can have bots of their own, they are by nature eminent programmers, now they'll have better material to work with.

Birth rates will plummet, it's win win.
Certainty disturbs me


Icarus

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #37 on: July 09, 2018, 07:39:59 PM »

Icarus

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #38 on: July 11, 2018, 10:37:08 PM »
Steel tariffs are in the news these days.  For anyone who might be interested, here is the history of steel in a lengthy article.  From King Tuts dagger to stainless steel refrigerators and more.  A useful article if history of a critical material is of interest to you.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/infrastructure/a20722505/history-of-steel/

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #39 on: September 06, 2018, 12:25:21 PM »
Random numbers are critical in many fields, particularly in Internet security. Trouble is it seems computers are lousy at generating true rsndom numbers and "analogue" systems are used.

ERNIE, the British national lottery bond system, 'Electronic Random Number Indicator Equipment', used a gas diode and the individual, rsndom, hits of electrons on the anode to generate numbers.


Genersting and selling almost pure random numbers is big business and about 10% of numbers may involve using lavalamps as generators!  Several lavalsmps are monitored by cameras and their random blobs turned into digital values. It seems one company uses them as a feature in its decorations.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lavarand

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bgrw3y

Quote
The Random Request
Two random questions in this episode. "Is anything truly random, or is everything predetermined?" asks Darren Spalding from Market Harborough.

Hannah and Adam go in search of random events, from dice throws to lava lamps. Can we predict the outcome of any event? And "how do computers manage to pick random numbers?", asks Jim Rennie from Mackinaw in Illinois.

Joining them are a random selection of experts: mathematician Colva Roney-Dougal, technology journalist Bill Thompson, Science Museum Curator Tilly Blyth and quantum physicist Jim AlKhalili.
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Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #40 on: October 03, 2018, 05:43:28 PM »
Sort in a set with mindfullness, something that kids can be taught to tge advantage of all.

Quote
Confucius said "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall." Some people, however, are just better at getting back up when the most challenging life events knock them down. Today there is a growing body of research into mental resilience; where it comes from, why it matters and how it can be nurtured.

Journalist Sian Williams explores the science of resilience; she meets Dr Michael Pluess from Queen Mary University of London who is testing for the resilience gene, and Professor Toni Bifulco who, along with her colleague Dr David Westley at Middlesex University, has developed an online test for those at risk of resilience failure.

Nobel laureate Professor Daniel Kahneman and science journalist and psychologist Daniel Goleman offer expert insight into resilience. Professor Martin Seligman who founded the Penn Resiliency Program, and David Clark, Professor of Experimental Psychology at the University of Oxford, describe the psychological background to mental strength and how it can be developed. Professor Lord Richard Layard from the LSE explains the economic benefits of building resilience into society. Sian visits Icknield Community College in Watlington in Oxfordshire where resilience is on the curriculum and watches a lesson in which children are taught to bounce back. She meets students, Headmaster Mat Hunter, teacher Claire Foster, and Lucy Bailey and Emma Judge from the resilience-building organisation How To Thrive.

The documentary is informed by Sian's own MSc research into post-traumatic growth and also from personal testimony: while drafting her thesis for academic publication, she experiences a sudden and very personal trauma which changes her view of resilience.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/radio/play/b07cvhrs
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