Author Topic: Political Turmoil in Brazil  (Read 6223 times)

xSilverPhinx

  • Non Dvcor
  • Administrator
  • Luxembourg Trembles!
  • *****
  • Posts: 14237
  • Gender: Female
  • "Fire together, wire together"
Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #60 on: April 06, 2018, 10:09:04 PM »
Damn.  :(

:( Yes, I fear for the future. I'll get into why that is at a later time.

I am thinking, "Venezuela all over again?"

I think "The South American Disease" concept has been mentioned before. Brazil had so much promise.

What "South American Disease"?  :no idea:

Can't remember when but the history of political rise and fall, dictatorships (and even "democratically" voted leaders come into that category at times) on your continent. Potentially rich countries failing to realise their potential.

OK, the likes of the "Democratic Rep of the Congo" fit the picture as well, but . . .

Well, I don't know about other countries in the South American continent, but it recently came to light that the military dictatorship from 1964 to 1985 was a result of a complex number of factors, among them the US meddling in Brazilian affairs because they thought they saw the threat of communism here.

https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu//NSAEBB/NSAEBB118/index.htm

Ah, well, if the Americans were involved . . .

Yeah, American foreign policy making the world "a better place".

(I'm not anti-American, I just dislike most of the governments they elect.)
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


jumbojak

  • Chandler's Pale Cock Slurper
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 5315
  • The Iconic Iconoclast
Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #61 on: April 07, 2018, 01:35:04 AM »
It wasn't just the US. The British were heavily involved in supporting the military dictatorship in Brazil, but the US deserves most of the blame for meddling in South America, just as Belgium and France deserve most of the blame for meddling in central Africa.

Both regions would be miles ahead if they had been left to their own devices. If you look at the history of Paraguay it becomes quite obvious. Eduardo Galiano wrote an excellent book about the troubled history of Latin America due to foreign involvement.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

xSilverPhinx

  • Non Dvcor
  • Administrator
  • Luxembourg Trembles!
  • *****
  • Posts: 14237
  • Gender: Female
  • "Fire together, wire together"
Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #62 on: April 07, 2018, 01:44:34 AM »
Both regions would be miles ahead if they had been left to their own devices. If you look at the history of Paraguay it becomes quite obvious.

I believe this true. It's not like Brazil doesn't have blood on its hands either: Paraguayan War (the British were involved too, though not directly). It's said that to this day Paraguay still hasn't recovered.

"War is politics by other means", so said Clausewitz, a strategist and philosopher of war.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2018, 02:10:44 AM by xSilverPhinx »
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Has Finally Learned to Not Feed The Trolls
  • *****
  • Posts: 6885
  • Gender: Male
Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #63 on: April 07, 2018, 09:38:27 AM »
It wasn't just the US. The British were heavily involved in supporting the military dictatorship in Brazil, but the US deserves most of the blame for meddling in South America, just as Belgium and France deserve most of the blame for meddling in central Africa.

Both regions would be miles ahead if they had been left to their own devices. If you look at the history of Paraguay it becomes quite obvious. Eduardo Galiano wrote an excellent book about the troubled history of Latin America due to foreign involvement.

And much of the non-sectsrian turmoil in the Middle East has origins in the Sykes-Picot agreement, so fown to the British and French there.

Though I am not sure what would have happened without the collonial nations drawing artificial borders in Africa and the M.E. Tribal disputes were exacerbated by those imposed borders to some degree but, I think, would still be a factor in areas pour in natural resources for day to day living. The greed of those, foreign or local, exploiting the mineral resources does little for ordinary people. Thus tribal vonflict over libing land continues, seeming worse because more and more people cintend for, in some cases diminidhing, resources.

And this is just at the begining of that other curse of "civilised living" - climate change.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.