Author Topic: Fun Science Videos  (Read 5932 times)

Icarus

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Re: Fun Science Videos
« Reply #90 on: April 12, 2018, 06:48:31 AM »
^^That makes our pale blue dot rather insignificant, doesn't it?

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Fun Science Videos
« Reply #91 on: April 13, 2018, 10:22:37 PM »
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


joeactor

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Re: Fun Science Videos
« Reply #92 on: April 13, 2018, 10:26:39 PM »
I want to be a rat tickler for my next job.

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Fun Science Videos
« Reply #93 on: April 13, 2018, 10:28:14 PM »
I want to be a rat tickler for my next job.

:grin:
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Dave

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Re: Fun Science Videos
« Reply #94 on: April 14, 2018, 06:46:17 AM »
Remember this from way back.

They call it tickling but it looks more like the sort of thing I do to dogs and cats, rub with my finger tips just in front of the base of their tail. Two theories, one it is a place they cannot scratch easily themselves, so appreciate another providing a service - two (especially in females) it is an "erogenous zone", a place that gets stimulated during intercourse, cats, male and female, with often raise their tsil vertically when uou do this (though the female lays her tail to one side when she "offers" herself). In cats it is also the area where one of their scent glands resides, the "This is my property" one that they rub on chair stringers etc as they pass under them. Forehead and cheek glands are reserved for family (cat and human) and other especially loved items.

I have seen that latter offered as an explanation for why cats and dogs often like the area between their front legs, or their chest, rubbed - in the males this is also a mutual contact area during dominance behaviour and intercourse.
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Fun Science Videos
« Reply #95 on: April 14, 2018, 03:36:25 PM »
Remember this from way back.

They call it tickling but it looks more like the sort of thing I do to dogs and cats, rub with my finger tips just in front of the base of their tail. Two theories, one it is a place they cannot scratch easily themselves, so appreciate another providing a service - two (especially in females) it is an "erogenous zone", a place that gets stimulated during intercourse, cats, male and female, with often raise their tsil vertically when uou do this (though the female lays her tail to one side when she "offers" herself). In cats it is also the area where one of their scent glands resides, the "This is my property" one that they rub on chair stringers etc as they pass under them. Forehead and cheek glands are reserved for family (cat and human) and other especially loved items.

I have seen that latter offered as an explanation for why cats and dogs often like the area between their front legs, or their chest, rubbed - in the males this is also a mutual contact area during dominance behaviour and intercourse.

That's interesting, didn't know that.

Tickling is a mystery to me. They say it's probably an associated result of sensation caused by two types of different receptors: touch (pressure) and pain. I don't know if this is true, but it really is an odd sensation if you think about it. Why feel ticklish in the first place and why scratch the spot (cause a little pain) to "override" the feeling? Why does too much tickling become uncomfortable or even painful? :notsure:   
« Last Edit: April 14, 2018, 03:49:42 PM by xSilverPhinx »
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Dave

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Re: Fun Science Videos
« Reply #96 on: April 14, 2018, 05:06:53 PM »
Remember this from way back.

They call it tickling but it looks more like the sort of thing I do to dogs and cats, rub with my finger tips just in front of the base of their tail. Two theories, one it is a place they cannot scratch easily themselves, so appreciate another providing a service - two (especially in females) it is an "erogenous zone", a place that gets stimulated during intercourse, cats, male and female, with often raise their tsil vertically when uou do this (though the female lays her tail to one side when she "offers" herself). In cats it is also the area where one of their scent glands resides, the "This is my property" one that they rub on chair stringers etc as they pass under them. Forehead and cheek glands are reserved for family (cat and human) and other especially loved items.

I have seen that latter offered as an explanation for why cats and dogs often like the area between their front legs, or their chest, rubbed - in the males this is also a mutual contact area during dominance behaviour and intercourse.

That's interesting, didn't know that.

Tickling is a mystery to me. They say it's probably an associated result of sensation caused by two types of different receptors: touch (pressure) and pain. I don't know if this is true, but it really is an odd sensation if you think about it. Why feel ticklish in the first place and why scratch the spot (cause a little pain) to "override" the feeling? Why does too much tickling become uncomfortable or even painful? :notsure:

Though a tickle and an itch are different things have you ever "slap-scrathed" a sudden itch? This is possibly an ancient reaction to splatt the blood sucker that has dug into you then scratch it off the skin. Scratching may also help squeeze out any toxins. Since tickling is often a part of erotic play do we react, even as small children, to such things in a happy-squirmy was if we trust the tickler? Tickling from a non-trusted person is offensive.

When talking about pain to a consultant we came to the agreement that an itch was a "grade 1" pain and that my heart attack was "grade10" for me. Later I found "grade 12"  when I had my fistula!
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.