Author Topic: Homo sapiens and Their Cousins  (Read 10628 times)

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Homo sapiens and Their Cousins
« Reply #75 on: July 14, 2019, 02:57:26 PM »
False. I have this one book reprinted in the millions of copies that completely does not cover any of this "evolution" stuff. It MUST be correct! What!?  :P

[drops god hat] I truly love seeing this sort of information! It's so neat to see all the little pieces of the puzzle getting put together.

Peer-reviewed by other sheepherders. Must be right.

:lol: Got me there! Must be.

:grin:
Give no mercy to your fear.



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Re: Homo sapiens and Their Cousins
« Reply #76 on: July 30, 2019, 04:52:41 PM »
An intriguing finding indicates that other subspecies than Neanderthal and the Denisovans contributed to the modern human genome.

"Out of Africa and into an archaic human melting pot" | ScienceDaily

Quote
Genetic analysis has revealed that the ancestors of modern humans interbred with at least five different archaic human groups as they moved out of Africa and across Eurasia.

While two of the archaic groups are currently known -- the Neandertals and their sister group the Denisovans from Asia -- the others remain unnamed and have only been detected as traces of DNA surviving in different modern populations. Island Southeast Asia appears to have been a particular hotbed of diversity.

Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), researchers from the University of Adelaide's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD) have mapped the location of past "mixing events" (analysed from existing scientific literature) by contrasting the levels of archaic ancestry in the genomes of present-day populations around the world.

"Each of us carry within ourselves the genetic traces of these past mixing events," says first author Dr João Teixeira, Australian Research Council Research Associate, ACAD, at the University of Adelaide. "These archaic groups were widespread and genetically diverse, and they survive in each of us. Their story is an integral part of how we came to be.

But as the ancestors of modern humans travelled further east they met and mixed with at least four other groups of archaic humans.

"Island Southeast Asia was already a crowded place when what we call modern humans first reached the region just before 50,000 years ago," says Dr Teixeira. "At least three other archaic human groups appear to have occupied the area, and the ancestors of modern humans mixed with them before the archaic humans became extinct."

[Continues . . .]




While I'm here, a couple more articles about Apidima 1, the recently identified early anatomically modern human skull.

"The Story of Humans and Neanderthals in Europe Is Being Rewritten" | The Atlantic

"Apidima Skull Is Earliest Homo Sapiens Outside Africa, Say Researchers" | Discover
"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
— H. L. Mencken


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Re: Homo sapiens and Their Cousins
« Reply #77 on: September 13, 2019, 03:09:39 PM »
Something about ancestors rather than cousins:

"Ancient fossil skull discovered in Ethiopia fills critical gap in human evolution" | ABC

Quote

The fossil skull is the most complete specimen ever found in sediments older than 3 million years.
 Image Credit: Dale Omari/Cleveland Museum of Natural History




The oldest most complete skull of a human ancestor ever discovered was found by chance by a local herder tending to his flock of goats in Ethiopia.

The rare fossil is all that remains of a hominin with a brain the size of chimpanzee's, that roamed shrublands surrounding a lake 3.8 million years ago.

"This specimen is the most complete cranium ever found from sediments older than 3 million years," said Ethiopian palaeoanthropologist Yohannes Haile-Selassie, who co-led the scientific team.

The discovery of the near complete skull puts a face on a critical gap in human evolution.

With its wide cheekbones, long protruding jaw and large canine tooth, the fossil dubbed MRD, is the first to reveal the face of Australopithecus anamensis — the oldest-known species definitively part of the human evolutionary tree.

The skull, detailed in the first of two papers in Nature, is set to rewrite our understanding of where A. anamensis fits between primitive hominins that lived more than 4 million years ago, and Australopithecus afarensis, the species made famous by the Lucy skeleton.

"It fills a gap in the fossil record from 3.6 to 3.9 million years and highlights some of the changes that took place from one species to another," Dr Haile-Selassie said.

[Continues . . .]




"A face for Lucy's ancestor" | ScienceDaily

Quote
Researchers have discovered a remarkably complete 3.8-million-year-old cranium of Australopithecus anamensis at Woranso-Mille in Ethiopia. The 3.8 million-year-old fossil cranium represents a time interval between 4.1 and 3.6 million years ago.

Australopithecus anamensis is the earliest-known species of Australopithecus and widely accepted as the progenitor of 'Lucy's' species, Australopithecus afarensis. Until now, A. anamensis was known mainly from jaws and teeth. Yohannes Haile-Selassie of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Stephanie Melillo of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and their colleagues have discovered the first cranium of A. anamensis at the paleontological site of Woranso-Mille, in the Afar Region of Ethiopia.

The 3.8 million-year-old fossil cranium represents a time interval between 4.1 and 3.6 million years ago, when A. anamensis gave rise to A. afarensis. Researchers used morphological features of the cranium to identify which species the fossil represents. "Features of the upper jaw and canine tooth were fundamental in determining that MRD was attributable to A. anamensis," said Melillo. "It is good to finally be able to put a face to the name." The MRD cranium, together with other fossils previously known from the Afar, show that A. anamensis and A. afarensis co-existed for approximately 100,000 years. This temporal overlap challenges the widely-accepted idea of a linear transition between these two early human ancestors. Haile-Selassie said: "This is a game changer in our understanding of human evolution during the Pliocene."

[Continues . . .]

"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
— H. L. Mencken