Author Topic: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again  (Read 11602 times)

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #240 on: November 18, 2018, 06:56:31 PM »
Thanks guys! ;D
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #241 on: November 28, 2018, 11:43:07 PM »
Quick question: when talking about a survey, is it better to say "best and worst scores" or "highest and lowest scores"? :notsure:
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #242 on: November 29, 2018, 12:15:50 AM »
Snipped the beginning of some long-winded blather about relative meaning of "response" and "score." :)

"Highest and lowest" doesn't imply a value judgement in the way that "best and worst" does. It's purely a description of the survey result. If your intention is to convey a matter of fact rather than your evaluation of that fact, I'd say it's better to avoid even implying a value judgement.
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #243 on: November 29, 2018, 12:44:19 AM »
Snipped the beginning of some long-winded blather about relative meaning of "response" and "score." :)

"Highest and lowest" doesn't imply a value judgement in the way that "best and worst" does. It's purely a description of the survey result. If your intention is to convey a matter of fact rather than your evaluation of that fact, I'd say it's better to avoid even implying a value judgement.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking, in the case of this survey, the results are numbers and statistical outcomes, so I imagine "highest and lowest" are the better terms. :)

Thanks, Recusant!  :thumbsup:
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Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #244 on: December 10, 2018, 12:04:48 AM »
Does it make sense to say a certain factor promotes the onset of a disease? What word would it be better to use instead? :notsure:
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #245 on: December 10, 2018, 12:27:59 AM »
Perhaps precedes?
 

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #246 on: December 10, 2018, 12:43:07 AM »
Promotes implies some sort of causative effect, whereas precedes merely means that it happens before.  So it depends on what you are trying to convey.
Maybe you are looking for exacerbates, which basically means that although the factor may or may not be causative, it makes the condition worse.
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #247 on: December 10, 2018, 12:54:41 AM »
Sorry, should have added more context. I forget there's no such thing as mind-reading. ;D (As of yet. :worried:)

I'm looking for a word that implies a causative effect, such as in the case of the accumulation of a certain protein in a person which may lead to the development of a chronic condition. The onset of the disease was due to the protein.
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jumbojak

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #248 on: December 10, 2018, 02:17:57 AM »
Why not just say that it caused the disease then?
 

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #249 on: December 10, 2018, 02:29:57 AM »
Why not just say that it caused the disease then?

That's what I ended up putting.  ;D

I don't know why I like to complicate things.  ::)
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hermes2015

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #250 on: December 10, 2018, 02:55:04 AM »
Induce?

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #251 on: December 10, 2018, 02:58:35 AM »
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Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #252 on: December 13, 2018, 11:27:59 PM »
I have another question. :grin:

What would be a good word for devastating cancer? My aunt asked me to help with an abstract, and in it, they wrote 'violent cancer', but it's a literal translation and just doesn't seem right in English. Does 'severe cancer' work? :notsure:
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #253 on: December 13, 2018, 11:57:11 PM »
I think "severe" would work, also "traumatic" and for that matter "devastating".  Altho I suppose it depends on whether you're describing the cancer's physical or emotional effects.  Rapid and progressive could work for a more physical description.  I know there's a better word, but I just can't remember it.
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #254 on: December 14, 2018, 12:11:40 AM »
I think "severe" would work, also "traumatic" and for that matter "devastating".  Altho I suppose it depends on whether you're describing the cancer's physical or emotional effects.  Rapid and progressive could work for a more physical description.  I know there's a better word, but I just can't remember it.

They're describing physical effects. 'Rapid and progressive' captures the meaning but there is a word limit so maybe it could be called 'aggressive cancer' instead? Or 'fast-growing cancer'? :notsure:
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