Author Topic: Dominionists in the United States  (Read 137 times)

Recusant

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Dominionists in the United States
« on: April 14, 2019, 02:50:51 AM »
The US is moving away from what these creeps would like the country to be, recognizing civil rights for previously oppressed groups, becoming more diverse, with public attitudes tending more toward tolerance. Yes, there is a minority of the population that supports people like Mike Pence and the president whose championing of right-wing Christian causes is purely opportunistic and hypocritical, but overall they're losing ground and they know it.

So what to do? They're not going down without a fight. They're writing up model legislation to give to willing Republican controlled state legislatures, enacting parts of the Dominionist dream.

"The plot against America: Inside the Christian right plan to 'remodel' the nation" | Salon

Quote
On April 3, USA Today published an array of stories under the banner, “Copy, Paste, Legislate,” exploring the political impact of model bills on state-level legislation — more than 10,000 bills from 2010 to 2018 — based on a two-year joint investigation with the Arizona Republic and the Center for Public Integrity. The lead story headline said it all: "You elected them to write new laws. They’re letting corporations do it instead."

OK, it wasn't quite all. While corporate influence was the strongest, figures revealed that conservative groups weren’t far behind: There were 4,301 bills from industry and 4,012 from conservative groups, far more than the 1,602 from liberal groups or the 248 classified as “other.” The hidden origins of these bills often hides their true intent. The most notorious such group, the American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC, for instance combines business interests with movement conservatives.

But within the fold of “conservative groups” there’s a whole other story to be told about the organizing of extremist religious conservatives, whose political mobilization, as I’ve noted in the past, played a crucial role in electing Donald Trump. Indeed, just the day before “Copy, Past, Legislate” was published, the Texas Senate passed SB-17, a bill that would protect anti-LGBTQ discrimination by all licensed professionals who claim to act on a “sincerely held religious belief.”

“It’s time for Americans to wake up to the harsh reality that the religious right, fueled by their fear of loss of power from the changing demographics in our country and their support from the Trump administration, is emboldened and aggressively pursuing all means possible to maintain white Christian power in America,” Rachel Laser, the president of Americans United For Separation of Church and State, told Salon. “Project Blitz, for example, has already introduced over 50 bills in at least 23 states this year alone,” she added.

One spin-off story published in the Nashville Tennessean dealt specifically with an anti-LGTBQ adoption model bill. (Simultaneously, NBC reported such bills were “'snowballing' in state legislatures.”) The Tennessee bill came from Project Blitz, which was described as “a legislative effort with the stated aim to ‘bring back God to America.’" But as Salon has reported in the past, Project Blitz is much more sinister than that.

[Continues . . .]

One of my personal bugbears, the deceitful shitweasel David Barton, is one of the Dominionists mentioned in the story.
"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
— H. L. Mencken


Bluenose

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Re: Dominionists in the United States
« Reply #1 on: April 14, 2019, 03:48:19 AM »
You know, I'm getting pretty tired of hearing "sincerely held religious beliefs" being used as a justification for discriminating against other people.  A person is entitled to believe whatever they want, whether sincerely or not (I'm a Pastafarian, after all...)  But once they attempt to use that belief to influence or deny service to or otherwise disenfranchise other people because they don't follow that belief, then the person has crossed a bright line that should never be crossed.  The religious right, quite rightly, recognise that their time of controlling society is coming to an end.  They don't like it.  Well, boohoo, sucks to be them.  I have precisely zero sympathy for these people and will fight their attempts to continue their milieu with all my being.  It is well time humankind woke up to the reality of life and cast away its childish preoccupation with imaginary spirit beings, none of which exist in the real world.
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In the beginning the Universe was created.
This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.”

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Icarus

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Re: Dominionists in the United States
« Reply #2 on: April 15, 2019, 01:54:28 AM »
:this:

Recusant

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Re: Dominionists in the United States
« Reply #3 on: April 15, 2019, 02:45:04 AM »
You know, I'm getting pretty tired of hearing "sincerely held religious beliefs" being used as a justification for discriminating against other people.  A person is entitled to believe whatever they want, whether sincerely or not (I'm a Pastafarian, after all...)  But once they attempt to use that belief to influence or deny service to or otherwise disenfranchise other people because they don't follow that belief, then the person has crossed a bright line that should never be crossed.  The religious right, quite rightly, recognise that their time of controlling society is coming to an end.  They don't like it.  Well, boohoo, sucks to be them.  I have precisely zero sympathy for these people and will fight their attempts to continue their milieu with all my being.  It is well time humankind woke up to the reality of life and cast away its childish preoccupation with imaginary spirit beings, none of which exist in the real world.

In the US, the Supreme Court has determined that sincerely held religious beliefs can indeed be used to avoid compliance with laws (in this instance paying for insurance that provides contraception to employees) as long as there is a "less restrictive means" by which those affected might gain access to that which had been withheld. It has also taken a step toward protecting the ability of those with sincerely held religious beliefs to discriminate based on those beliefs.

Meanwhile the Trump administration Department of Justice has issued guidelines (PDF) on protecting those with sincerely held religious beliefs from governmental interference with those beliefs.

With the two justices appointed by the Trump administration to the Supreme Court of the US, a solid conservative majority has been protected, and challenges to the above don't stand much chance of succeeding. In addition, the Trump administration and the Republican controlled US Senate has been confirming a large number of solidly conservative judges to positions in the federal judiciary (after Republicans spent years preventing the previous administration from getting judges into those same positions).

So while the country is moving toward a less discriminatory attitude, the federal judiciary is likely going to be doing its best to protect those who don't agree with these changes for a long time.
"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
— H. L. Mencken