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Getting To Know You => Ask HAF => Topic started by: OldGit on December 14, 2014, 10:30:54 AM

Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: OldGit on December 14, 2014, 10:30:54 AM
Most of these are more or less right, though many don't show understanding of the reasons.  Several tell only part of the story (e.g. 9, 11,13).  7 and 17 are plain wrong.  Interesting, though.  Thanks, Fernanda.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 14, 2014, 12:43:28 PM
Quote
War comes from a Germanic root that meant "to confuse"

Is this correct?  (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=war)

Quote
Nightmare comes from an old English word "mare" that refers to a demon who suffocates you in your sleep

As for nightmare I came across other sources that say that 'mare' is the Old English word for 'incubus' and 'demon'.

It isn't the case?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on December 14, 2014, 05:11:52 PM
Quote
War comes from a Germanic root that meant "to confuse"

Is this correct? (http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=war)

The Oxford English Dictionary gives a more nuanced etymology:

Quote
Late Old English (c1050) wyrre , werre , < North-eastern Old French werre = Central Old French and modern French guerre , Proven?al guerra , gerra , Spanish guerra , Portuguese guerra , Italian guerra (medieval Latin werra , guerra ) < Old High German werra (Middle High German werre ) confusion, discord, strife, related to the Old High German, Old Saxon werran strong verb, to bring into confusion or discord (whence modern German wirren weak verb to confuse, perplex; the earlier verb survives in verworren participial adjective, confused), < Germanic root *werz- , *wers- , whence also worse adj.

It is a curious fact that no Germanic nation in early historic times had in living use any word properly meaning ?war?, though several words with that meaning survived in poetry, in proverbial phrases, and in compound personal names. The Romanic-speaking peoples, who were obliged to avoid the Latin bellum on account of its formal coincidence with bello- beautiful, found no nearer equivalent in Germanic than werra. In Old English the usual translation of bellum was gewin, struggle, strife. The continental Germanic languages later developed separate words for ?war?: German krieg (whence Swedish, Danish krig), Dutch oorlog; Icelandic uses ?fri?r ?un-peace?.


[Bold emphasis mine. -- R]
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: OldGit on December 14, 2014, 06:18:05 PM
Fernanda, the Online Etymology Dictionary is very trustworthy indeed, but entries are not always as complete as one would wish - Recusant's Oxford ED entry illustrates that.   Here the two disagree as to the original, primary meaning of the root, Oxford ED taking it to be the 'confuse' sense and the Net Dictionary as 'strife'.  I always thought the latter was basic, however in the end both meanings existed in the oldest Germanic languages and in Modern German both are still around.

As to 'nightmare', I grovel in apology.  I thought I knew the ultimate meaning of mare; I was sure it was retained in German M?rchen.  I should have double-checked, but I didn't.  Now I have egg on my face.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 14, 2014, 09:28:54 PM
No worries, OG  :)

Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 14, 2014, 11:00:32 PM
I'm on a list posting spree these days. ;D

25 Words From Other Languages That Would Be Very Useful In English (http://list25.com/25-words-languages-english/?view=all)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: OldGit on December 15, 2014, 09:49:43 AM
There are some lovely ones there. 

We could use more such words, such as pofflecrunt (Gittish) - to rub horse manure into a bishop's chasuble, or clurgie (Mock-Scots Gittish)  -a goyling sound not unlike the grackle of a heucht.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 15, 2014, 10:05:45 AM
There are some lovely ones there. 

We could use more such words, such as pofflecrunt (Gittish) - to rub horse manure into a bishop's chasuble, or clurgie (Mock-Scots Gittish)  -a goyling sound not unlike the grackle of a heucht.

I like those! :D
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jumbojak on December 15, 2014, 03:21:29 PM
I like the idea of grief bacon. Hell, I like the idea of any kind of bacon. :}
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tom62 on December 15, 2014, 09:04:15 PM
I like the Dutch word "snuffelpaal" (sniffling pole"), which is an air pollution detector 
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 15, 2014, 11:42:37 PM
I like the Dutch word "snuffelpaal" (sniffling pole"), which is an air pollution detector  

That's a funny way of putting it!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on December 16, 2014, 12:42:13 AM
By the way, I'm glad that your mother liked the pronunciation sites, xSilverPhinx.  :)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 16, 2014, 05:46:01 AM
By the way, I'm glad that your mother liked the pronunciation sites, xSilverPhinx.  :)

:) She said that they were perfect, and she especially liked especially Forvo.

Ent?o, como est? indo seu portugu?s? (So, how's your portuguese coming along?)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on December 16, 2014, 07:33:11 AM
Miserably.  ;D

I have a smattering of French and German from school (much too long ago), and enough Spanish to kind of muddle through, but that is actually kind of messing with my attempt at Portuguese. I'll probably just try to learn to say a few things like "I'm very sorry, but I can't speak Portuguese."  ;)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 16, 2014, 10:06:39 AM
Nothing a good travel phrasebook can't help with. ;D If you get one then just see that the pronunciation guide is European Portuguese and not Brazilian because they can differ quite a bit. Orthography is the same in both but they have some different grammatical preferences. Nothing that poses too much of a barrier, though.  Sometimes we have a hard time understanding each other's speech. :D

The shortest, and easiest way to remember, way of saying that would be "Desculpe, mas n?o falo portugu?s." If you want to ask whether they speak English/Spanish then you could ask "Fala ingl?s/espanhol?"
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on December 16, 2014, 03:54:54 PM
Nothing a good travel phrasebook can't help with. ;D If you get one then just see that the pronunciation guide is European Portuguese and not Brazilian because they can differ quite a bit. Orthography is the same in both but they have some different grammatical preferences. Nothing that poses too much of a barrier, though.  Sometimes we have a hard time understanding each other's speech. :D

The shortest, and easiest way to remember, way of saying that would be "Desculpe, mas n?o falo portugu?s." If you want to ask whether they speak English/Spanish then you could ask "Fala ingl?s/espanhol?"

Thank you, xSilverPhinx. (http://i58.tinypic.com/1zy7wvm.jpg)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 17, 2014, 11:33:25 PM
No problem. :)

Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 16, 2015, 12:05:14 PM
I thought I'd resurrect this thread to ask yet another question.  :poke:

This time, specifically regarding the use of present perfect in the standard British English variety. When writing a scientific paper, is it preferable to say Doe et al. (2015) have demonstrated" or just demonstrated?
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on November 16, 2015, 12:56:55 PM
I thought I'd resurrect this thread to ask yet another question.  :poke:

This time, specifically regarding the use of present perfect in the standard British English variety. When writing a scientific paper, is it preferable to say Doe et al. (2015) have demonstrated" or just demonstrated?
Either will do. I'd go for demonstrated
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 16, 2015, 01:06:56 PM
OK. Thanks, Tank!   :thumbsup:

Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on November 16, 2015, 02:49:33 PM
OK. Thanks, Tank!   :thumbsup:

Tank you very much.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 16, 2015, 07:29:50 PM
OK. Thanks, Tank!   :thumbsup:

Tank you very much.

I almost said that.  :P
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on January 19, 2016, 10:44:15 AM
I'm embarrassed by the stupidity of this question, but I have to ask.  :couchhide:

Which is preferable - an M4 antagonist or a M4 antagonist?

I know 'M' isn't a vowel but it's the way pronounced that gets those little worms of doubt wiggling in my head. :bigspecs:
When I google both options the former turns up more options than the latter.

So yeah.  :daddance:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Claireliontamer on January 19, 2016, 01:27:46 PM
Personally I'd say an but not sure if that's grammatically correct.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Papasito Bruno on January 19, 2016, 01:45:32 PM
I agree with Claire, fairly certain it would be correct to say, "An 54 antagonist". However, how about saying "An 54 mofo antagonist"?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on January 19, 2016, 02:17:18 PM
No question, "an M4 antagonist" is correct. When the name of a letter is pronounced, it's just like any other word. Since "M" is pronounced "em," the correct diction is "an."

Quote
Before you make the commitment to earn an MBA, you must first understand exactly what an MBA is, as well as whether it’s the right degree program for you. An MBA, or a Master of Business Administration, provides a graduate education in foundational business practices, such as accounting, finance, marketing and management.

But don't just believe me or some copywriter. Check the Grammar-Monster (http://www.grammar-monster.com/lessons/an_or_a.htm).  :)
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on January 19, 2016, 05:18:38 PM
Thank you guys!  :grin:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on January 19, 2016, 06:11:18 PM
I agree with Claire, fairly certain it would be correct to say, "An 54 antagonist". However, how about saying "An 54 mofo antagonist"?

That would almost make it too badass.  8)

However, I don't particularly like the word 'mofo', which in Portuguese means 'mold'. That's why I said almost.  :P
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on July 23, 2017, 02:34:45 AM
I'm going to resurrect this necrothread to ask for help once again.

In the following sentence:

Quote
Here, we explored for the first time the boundary conditions to turn caffeine administration a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.
 

'Turn' seems to be an inadequate choice of a word to use in this context. I'm rattling my brain but can't think of a better way to rewrite this sentence.  :scratch:

I would drink copious amounts of caffeine right now in hopes that it might enhance my functioning but it's almost 11 pm, which would make that a really bad idea.  :count sheep:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on July 23, 2017, 05:49:31 AM
I'm going to resurrect this necrothread to ask for help once again.

In the following sentence:

Quote
Here, we explored for the first time the boundary conditions to turn caffeine administration a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.
 

'Turn' seems to be an inadequate choice of a word to use in this context. I'm rattling my brain but can't think of a better way to rewrite this sentence.  :scratch:

I would drink copious amounts of caffeine right now in hopes that it might enhance my functioning but it's almost 11 pm, which would make that a really bad idea.  :count sheep:

This is not my field, so don't understand the sentence, but my first impression is that it is too long and should be split into two. Could you explain what it actually means in simple English?

That word turn does feel a bit odd, but it could be perfectly legitimate usage within the jargon of this particular discipline. Once I understand it, I can suggest some ways to rewrite the sentence.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on July 23, 2017, 08:21:18 AM
Not my field either, but in terms of using English I will have a go.

Original:
Quote
Here, we explored for the first time the boundary conditions to turn caffeine administration a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.

First revision:
Here we explored, for the first time, the boundary conditions to utilise caffeine administration as a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.

Not entirely happy with the context of "contextual" here, nor in what context "trace reactivation" is used - sounds like jargon and thus dangerous to rephrase.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on July 23, 2017, 08:31:35 AM
OR...or...

Quote
Here, we explored for the first time the boundary conditions to turn caffeine administration a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.

Here we explored, for the first time, the boundary conditions to convert caffeine administration into a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on July 23, 2017, 08:55:27 AM
OR...or...

Quote
Here, we explored for the first time the boundary conditions to turn caffeine administration a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.

Here we explored, for the first time, the boundary conditions to convert caffeine administration into a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.

Better, Mags!

Silver, can I assume this is to do with PTSD? Does, "...contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation." refer to, 'fear memories that are trggered by elements of simularity in current events'? I have reiterated, re-jargonised, it to try to get the hang of it.

I bring you the next potential epic,
"JARGON WARS!"
Hear two teams of scientists, each determined to dominate language in their own way, slang it out across the vast wastes of
The Conference Centre!
See them commit ever more meaningless phrases in their papers!
Watch the orginary man shrug and walk off, still ignorant of the meaning of the unfolding dramas on planet Science!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on July 23, 2017, 09:10:36 AM
OR...or...

Quote
Here, we explored for the first time the boundary conditions to turn caffeine administration a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.

Here we explored, for the first time, the boundary conditions to convert caffeine administration into a potential pharmacological strategy to attenuate  contextual fear memories through periodical trace reactivation.

That is excellent. Also, no need to split into two sentences.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on July 23, 2017, 11:50:57 AM
Yes, that is excellent Mags, thank you! :hug: Thanks too to you guys. :)

Basically "contextual fear memories" refers to fear memories associated with a context, or environment (conditioned stimulus) that became aversive through pairing with a naturally aversive unconditioned stimulus. In other words, they were put in a neutral box, received footshocks and started fearing the box as a result.

"Trace" refers to memory trace, which was periodically reactivated (they were put in the box but did not receive any footshocks, just made to remember so that the memory trace becomes labile again and can suffer interference).

Yes, it does have to do with anxiety disorders such as PTSD.

:shrug: These are the types of words used; I looked up the For authors section of the journal this paper is going to submitted to and there they explicitly state that authors should take into consideration that readers are knowledgeable (in other words, of the field) so there isn't much leeway to go into elaborate explanations. Your observation is right, Gloucester!

(I even started a thread a while back, on scientists in their ivory towers and the alienated general public):notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on July 23, 2017, 12:33:58 PM
I managed to pass my final essay assignment in the sociology module at college deliberately using as little jargon as I could! Could not avoid two whole phrases IIRC.

Even knowing it is often unavoidable I still dislike jargon. "Shorthand" words, that are understood by all practioners, are not so bad - whole paragraphs of assembled jargon that even colleagues have to think about (or that have to be interpreted in footnotes) are a different matter! But, in your trade, Silver, you have to go with the flow amongst your colleagues. Until you get rich and/or famous and/or respected enough to write your own rules!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on July 23, 2017, 03:03:34 PM
Well, if even colleagues have to think about it then it's not a problem of jargon, it's poorly written. :P

When I started my internship I couldn't make sense of anything anybody or any papers were saying, especially since it's not an area they adequately prepare you for during  undergrad at my uni. It sucked, for sure, but eventually you learn. While I dislike jargon it can make text more succinct. If someone had to explain every little detail then they wouldn't get much said without exceeding the journal's word count. 

To be fair, though, all behavioural procedures are explained in detail in the paper, allowing a reader who is unfamiliar with the jargon to get the gist of it if they were to read the entire thing. It just doesn't go into detail on the theory behind such terms in the Introduction or Discussion, because it assumes the reader is knowledgeable.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on July 23, 2017, 03:22:04 PM
Yeah, my last was a bit tongue in cheek (wish there was a TIC emoji).

I can usually get the gist out of abstracts, thrown mainly by terms like "sD5t" or "2flouroxylate-thionate di-benzoase" (both nade up) (I think...), but those I can look up. Trade words, especially medical ones, I can often decode now I know what some of the Latin bits mean - but they do not always transliterate well!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on July 24, 2017, 12:26:46 AM
Yes, that is excellent Mags, thank you! :hug: Thanks too to you guys. :)
:boaterhat:
 :hug:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 11, 2017, 09:07:39 PM
Ok, this one is a little confusing but I have a feeling the following isn't common usage.

The word significance. Can it be used to mean 'meaning', as in meaning of a word? Not in the sense of importance, but what a word actually means, as in dictionary definition.

This one confuses me because in Portuguese one can use 'significância' in this context but I'm not too sure the same applies in English. :notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on September 11, 2017, 09:33:03 PM
It would be correct to write of the 'significance of this word in that particular context,' which isn't exactly about the definition of the word, but more about its usage. Since many words have more than one correct definition, to ponder a word's significance is to try to understand what it is intended to mean when encountered in a specific piece of writing. It's not a direct synonym of 'definition.' Perhaps others view it differently, and I'd be interested in seeing what somebody like OldGit has to say about this.  :)
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 11, 2017, 09:37:58 PM
Ok, this one is a little confusing but I have a feeling the following isn't common usage.

The word significance. Can it be used to mean 'meaning', as in meaning of a word? Not in the sense of importance, but what a word actually means, as in dictionary definition.

This one confuses me because in Portuguese one can use 'significância' in this context but I'm not too sure the same applies in English. :notsure:

Good one!

I would use it as a close synonym of "importance", but, somehow without the same implication if "value". "The significance of this action is evident in the resulting social and political changes. The "action" is possibly also "important", but using "significance" implies that it is not critical in the context.

"Fred was a significant figure in history", "Tom was an important figure in history". I would say that Tom had more value in, more impact on, the historical outcome than Fred.

Disappointingly Fowler does not offer any help here. Do you have a copy of, "Fowlers Modern English Usage" Silver? If not get one! I'll buy you one for the upcoming gifting season if necessary!

Sorry, doubt that I helped much, the nuances here are, er, delicate. It is what makes English so flexible, so suited to rhyming poetry!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 11, 2017, 09:56:24 PM
Since many words have more than one correct definition, to ponder a word's significance is to try to understand what it is intended to mean when encountered in a specific piece of writing.

:smilenod: This is exactly what I was wondering, if it's correct to say something like 'a word's significance within a context', or something along those lines.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 11, 2017, 10:05:14 PM
Good one!

I would use it as a close synonym of "importance", but, somehow without the same implication if "value". "The significance of this action is evident in the resulting social and political changes. The "action" is possibly also "important", but using "significance" implies that it is not critical in the context.

"Fred was a significant figure in history", "Tom was an important figure in history". I would say that Tom had more value in, more impact on, the historical outcome than Fred.

Yes, the most common usage I encounter for the word is in that sense, I was wondering if if it could be used in other ways. I'm looking for words in English that are equivalent to the same word in Portuguese, preferably words that look alike but they would obviously have to have the the same meaning.


Quote
Disappointingly Fowler does not offer any help here. Do you have a copy of, "Fowlers Modern English Usage" Silver? If not get one! I'll buy you one for the upcoming gifting season if necessary!

Sorry, doubt that I helped much, the nuances here are, er, delicate. It is what makes English so flexible, so suited to rhyming poetry!

:lol: I looked up Fowler's book, one of the local mega bookstores has it in e-book format, and cheap too! I think I may purchase it. Looks interesting. :grin: 
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 11, 2017, 10:09:08 PM
(https://i.imgur.com/r4bZSU1.png)

Not sure if the root helps here, though it does distsnce the nuance from "value" , somehow imparts a sense of "future". Dynamic rather than static?

Guessing "signal" comes from the same root, hang on . . . Nope, that surprised me!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 11, 2017, 10:15:14 PM
'Signal' most probably shares a root with 'sign'. What about 'signature'? :notsure: I'm guessing it shares the same root as 'sign'.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 11, 2017, 10:15:38 PM
Good one!

I would use it as a close synonym of "importance", but, somehow without the same implication if "value". "The significance of this action is evident in the resulting social and political changes. The "action" is possibly also "important", but using "significance" implies that it is not critical in the context.

"Fred was a significant figure in history", "Tom was an important figure in history". I would say that Tom had more value in, more impact on, the historical outcome than Fred.

Yes, the most common usage I encounter for the word is in that sense, I was wondering if if it could be used in other ways. I'm looking for words in English that are equivalent to the same word in Portuguese, preferably words that look alike but they would obviously have to have the the same meaning.


Quote
Disappointingly Fowler does not offer any help here. Do you have a copy of, "Fowlers Modern English Usage" Silver? If not get one! I'll buy you one for the upcoming gifting season if necessary!

Sorry, doubt that I helped much, the nuances here are, er, delicate. It is what makes English so flexible, so suited to rhyming poetry!

:lol: I looked up Fowler's book, one of the local mega bookstores has it in e-book format, and cheap too! I think I may purchase it. Looks interesting. :grin:

A Chinese engineer where I worked had an old copy of a book of English usage, by example, written in English but in China for Chinese students. She inherited it from her father - I lusted after it, it was a brilliantly written book - but no longer in print. The author was probably no longer on the party approved list.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 11, 2017, 10:20:55 PM
'Signal' most probably shares a root with 'sign'. What about 'signature'? :notsure: I'm guessing it shares the same root as 'sign'.

It comes from "signum", a mark or token and, guess what, so does "sign". "Signature" comes from "signare", to sign or to mark. Same family.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 11, 2017, 10:21:40 PM
A Chinese engineer where I eorked had an old vopy of a nook of English usage, by example, written in English but in China for Chinese students. She inherited it from her father - I lusted after it, it was a brilliantly written book - but no longer in print. The author was probably no longer on the party approved list.

Have you checked if it's available online? Some out-of-print books are.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 11, 2017, 10:30:29 PM
'Signal' most probably shares a root with 'sign'. What about 'signature'? :notsure: I'm guessing it shares the same root as 'sign'.

It comes from "signum", a mark or token and, guess what, so does "sign". "Signature" comes from "signare", to sign or to mark. Same family.

:grin:

The modern Portuguese 'assinatura' has diverged a little from its Latin ancestor. :chin:

:lol: All these words in my head cause a bit of confusion at times, for instance, the word for 'pull' is 'puxe' (pooshee - which sounds a little like 'push', especially the damn 'sh') and there have been more than one occasion when I've tried to push a door with the word 'puxe' written on it in big, bright letters.  :blush: :run!: I'm such a mess. :P
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 11, 2017, 10:31:21 PM
A Chinese engineer where I eorked had an old vopy of a nook of English usage, by example, written in English but in China for Chinese students. She inherited it from her father - I lusted after it, it was a brilliantly written book - but no longer in print. The author was probably no longer on the party approved list.

Have you checked if it's available online? Some out-of-print books are.

Can't remember the title from 12 years ago! Can't remember what I had for lunch today.

: show
Ah, it has just come back to me, sorry about that, I'll open a window . . .
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 11, 2017, 10:42:32 PM
A Chinese engineer where I eorked had an old vopy of a nook of English usage, by example, written in English but in China for Chinese students. She inherited it from her father - I lusted after it, it was a brilliantly written book - but no longer in print. The author was probably no longer on the party approved list.

Have you checked if it's available online? Some out-of-print books are.

Can't remember the title from 12 years ago! Can't remember what I had for lunch today.

: show
Ah, it has just come back to me, sorry about that, I'll open a window . . .


:o

Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 13, 2017, 05:04:06 AM
Why, at almost 5-bloody-a-bloody-m, whilst laying awake after a trip to the loo, does my mind suddenly think of "marked" as a synonym for "significant" - as in, "He had a [insert here] effect on history"! Back to the link with "signal" and "signature" again, "making one's mark", on paper, in a job or situation . . .
,

Tsk, brains, who can tell how they work?

Oh, maybe people like you, Silver?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on September 13, 2017, 05:13:00 AM
Has anyone suggested consequential?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 13, 2017, 05:19:17 AM
Has anyone suggested consequential?

Hmm, that suggests an order of events does it not, rather than just intrinsic value? "His actions were consequential in the formation of . . ." and,  "His actions were significant in the formation of . . ." don't quite match for me.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on September 13, 2017, 05:23:40 AM
Has anyone suggested consequential?

Hmm, that suggests an order of events does it not, rather than just intrinsic value? "His actions were consequential in the formation of . . ."

Yes, but it can be used as a synonym for important. Isn't English a marvellous language?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 13, 2017, 05:29:08 AM
Quote
Yes, but it can be used as a synonym for important.
Hmm, maybe by some.  :snooty:

Quote
Isn't English a marvellous language?
YES!  :beer:

Later: OK, I give in on that, ask for synonyms of "consequential" and you get synonyms of "significant". But I think i would only use it in the "'order" sense. However, I have to agree "inconsequential" does imply nugatory.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 13, 2017, 05:43:49 AM
I'll match your "consequential" and raise you a "substantial".
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on September 13, 2017, 05:51:47 AM
I'll match your "consequential" and raise you a "substantial".

"Weighty", like me.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 13, 2017, 11:17:33 PM
Why, at almost 5-bloody-a-bloody-m, whilst laying awake after a trip to the loo, does my mind suddenly think of "marked" as a synonym for "significant" - as in, "He had a [insert here] effect on history"! Back to the link with "signal" and "signature" again, "making one's mark", on paper, in a job or situation . . .
,

Tsk, brains, who can tell how they work?

Oh, maybe people like you, Silver?

:lol: I would love to be able to see the thought processes that go on in yours! :P  ;D
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 14, 2017, 08:59:23 PM
Why, at almost 5-bloody-a-bloody-m, whilst laying awake after a trip to the loo, does my mind suddenly think of "marked" as a synonym for "significant" - as in, "He had a [insert here] effect on history"! Back to the link with "signal" and "signature" again, "making one's mark", on paper, in a job or situation . . .
,

Tsk, brains, who can tell how they work?

Oh, maybe people like you, Silver?

:lol: I would love to be able to see the thought processes that go on in yours! :P  ;D

My mind is a butterfly, it flits from interesting flower to interesting flower - merely sampling a fact here, drinking deeply of the nectar of knowledge there. A hundred flowers a day are needed to find a gem.

(And twice my normal wine ration, as I have had tonight, oft causes me to wax lyrical. I'll hope the waning bit waits 'til the morning...)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 14, 2017, 09:24:10 PM
Why, at almost 5-bloody-a-bloody-m, whilst laying awake after a trip to the loo, does my mind suddenly think of "marked" as a synonym for "significant" - as in, "He had a [insert here] effect on history"! Back to the link with "signal" and "signature" again, "making one's mark", on paper, in a job or situation . . .
,

Tsk, brains, who can tell how they work?

Oh, maybe people like you, Silver?

:lol: I would love to be able to see the thought processes that go on in yours! :P  ;D

My mind is a butterfly, it flits from interesting flower to interesting flower - merely sampling here, drinking deeply of the nectar of knowledge there. A hundred flowers a day are needed to find a gem.

(And twice my normal wine ration, as I have had tonight, oft causes me to wax lyrical. I'll leave the waning bit 'til the morning...)

:grin:

"A hundred flowers a day are needed to find a gem."

Or suffer an nectar overdose.

Sorry, I'm incapable of being poetic today. :P 
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 14, 2017, 09:41:45 PM
Why, at almost 5-bloody-a-bloody-m, whilst laying awake after a trip to the loo, does my mind suddenly think of "marked" as a synonym for "significant" - as in, "He had a [insert here] effect on history"! Back to the link with "signal" and "signature" again, "making one's mark", on paper, in a job or situation . . .
,

Tsk, brains, who can tell how they work?

Oh, maybe people like you, Silver?

:lol: I would love to be able to see the thought processes that go on in yours! :P  ;D

My mind is a butterfly, it flits from interesting flower to interesting flower - merely sampling here, drinking deeply of the nectar of knowledge there. A hundred flowers a day are needed to find a gem.

(And twice my normal wine ration, as I have had tonight, oft causes me to wax lyrical. I'll leave the waning bit 'til the morning...)

:grin:

"A hundred flowers a day are needed to find a gem."

Or suffer an nectar overdose.

Sorry, I'm incapable of being poetic today. :P

You cannot overdose on the nectar of knowledge!

(Been known to overdose on mead, the holy spirit distilled from the nectar of flowers, though. (OK, it's brewed from honey but that is so mundane . . .))
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 17, 2017, 04:53:15 PM
'Randomically'...is that even a word? :notsure: I know 'randomly' but have never seen 'randomically' before.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on September 17, 2017, 05:01:22 PM
'Randomically'...is that even a word? :notsure: I know 'randomly' but have never seen 'randomically' before.

It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary, and is likely an invention of the writer. Certainly superfluous to requirements.  :D
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 17, 2017, 05:04:34 PM
'Randomically'...is that even a word? :notsure: I know 'randomly' but have never seen 'randomically' before.

Sounds like a description of a fast moving, multi-participant, free-choice stand-up comedy show!

Seems it could be made-up, but does that qualify it as a word? Best entry I found was this one

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/83611/what-does-randomically-mean
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 17, 2017, 05:06:09 PM
It's bloody done it again!

Try to post and the thingie goes tound and nothing happens for a long time. Cancel and try to resend and nothing happens at all. Go back a page on the browser and post agspain - that works, but seems the first one got posted anyway, just the notification and refresh does not reach me.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 17, 2017, 05:27:46 PM
'Randomically'...is that even a word? :notsure: I know 'randomly' but have never seen 'randomically' before.

It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary, and is likely an invention of the writer. Certainly superfluous to requirements.  :D

Superfluous to the British Corpus anyway - America sometimes seems to go in strange language directions and retains a lot of words we now think of as archaisms here.

If I had found this word put into the mouth in one of the characters in, say, Spike Milligan's, "Puckoon", (or even Dylan Thomas', "Llareggub") I would have just accepted it and read on.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 17, 2017, 06:58:42 PM
Yeah...I pretty sure they meant 'randomly', as in randomly assigned to different groups. I tried looking up if 'randomically' was some obscure statistical term but couldn't find anything.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 17, 2017, 07:01:10 PM
It's bloody done it again!

Try to post and the thingie goes tound and nothing happens for a long time. Cancel and try to resend and nothing happens at all. Go back a page on the browser and post agspain - that works, but seems the first one got posted anyway, just the notification and refresh does not reach me.

I hate it when that happens! That's why I always copy my lengthy replies before posting, I don't have the patience to retype the whole thing! :haironfire:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on September 18, 2017, 04:05:31 AM
'Randomically'...is that even a word? :notsure: I know 'randomly' but have never seen 'randomically' before.

It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary, and is likely an invention of the writer. Certainly superfluous to requirements.  :D

Superfluous to the British Corpus anyway . . .

The OED covers American words, and more (http://public.oed.com/the-oed-today/guide-to-the-third-edition-of-the-oed/):

Quote
The varieties of English covered include British English, American English, Australian English, New Zealand English, the Englishes of South and South-East Asia, Southern Africa, and the Caribbean, among others.

. . . America sometimes seems to go in strange language directions and retains a lot of words we now think of as archaisms here.

I'm 100% in agreement with you here.  :)

Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 18, 2017, 07:37:58 AM
'Randomically'...is that even a word? :notsure: I know 'randomly' but have never seen 'randomically' before.

It's not in the Oxford English Dictionary, and is likely an invention of the writer. Certainly superfluous to requirements.  :D

Superfluous to the British Corpus anyway . . .

The OED covers American words, and more (http://public.oed.com/the-oed-today/guide-to-the-third-edition-of-the-oed/):

Quote
The varieties of English covered include British English, American English, Australian English, New Zealand English, the Englishes of South and South-East Asia, Southern Africa, and the Caribbean, among others.

. . . America sometimes seems to go in strange language directions and retains a lot of words we now think of as archaisms here.

I'm 100% in agreement with you here.  :)
Ah, I have the ODE, Oxford Dictionary of English, but that is about 15 years old! That's aged for a dictionary these days.

Sorry, my comment was just a small dig at American English, or perhaps more American usage. Especially if your name is George W Bush? Hmm, "Bush's Usage and Abusage of American English" , sounds like a viable title!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on September 18, 2017, 07:42:04 AM
Was it Bush who used the word "irregardless"?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 18, 2017, 07:56:33 AM
Was it Bush who used the word "irregardless"?
Dunno, but it is defined, as an alternative for "regardless," in Oxford Dictionaries. Good chance it was though!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Arturo on September 19, 2017, 06:07:47 AM
"Hungrinator"

A person who destroys everything in his/her path to get to the food lol
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on October 12, 2017, 02:55:36 PM
Is there a difference between 'overhead illumination' and 'ceiling illumination'? Which would be preferable?   :scratch:

ETA: Or 'overhead lighting'.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Davin on October 12, 2017, 03:28:25 PM
"Overhead lighting" sounds the best to me.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on October 12, 2017, 03:37:06 PM
Is there a difference between 'overhead illumination' and 'ceiling illumination'? Which would be preferable?   :scratch:

ETA: Or 'overhead lighting'.

Overhead lighting could be outdoors and not attached to a ceiling, for instance light from a lamp post.
Ceiling lighting is attached to the ceiling in a room, but one can have tall standard lamps that provide overhead lighting in a room. They would not be called ceiling lighting.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on October 12, 2017, 03:39:31 PM
Is there a difference between 'overhead illumination' and 'ceiling illumination'? Which would be preferable?   :scratch:

ETA: Or 'overhead lighting'.

I agree with Davin and hermes2015. If you wish to specify that the illumination is coming from the ceiling rather than from a tall torchiere floor lamp for instance, you could say "ceiling-mounted illumination" though "ceiling-mounted lighting" is preferable in my opinion.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on October 12, 2017, 03:44:01 PM
Is there a difference between 'overhead illumination' and 'ceiling illumination'? Which would be preferable?   :scratch:

ETA: Or 'overhead lighting'.

Are the lights fitted to or rdcessed into the ceiling or suspended from it or some kind of substructure? You could say, "Overhead illumination was provided by recessed ceiling lights"  but that is a bit clumsy. As Davin said, "Overhead lighting", whether qualified by type or not, covers all. Qualification might be needed for technical - recessed ceiling lights give clear overhead space for cranes etc, or decorative, cosmetic descriptive purposes. Recessed, sealed lighting can also be designed to be more easily and hygenically cleaned.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on October 12, 2017, 03:45:32 PM
Thanks guys!  :thumbsup:

Are the lights fitted to or rdcessed into the ceiling or suspended from it or some kind of substructure? You could say, "Overhead illumination was provided by recessed ceiling lights"  but that is a bit clumsy. As Davin said, "Overhead lighting", whether qualified by type or not, covers all. Qualification might be needed for technical - recessed ceiling lights give clear overhead space for cranes etc, or decorative, cosmetic descriptive purposes. Recessed, sealed lighting can also be designed to be more easily and hygenically cleaned.

Simple fluorescent lights attached to the ceiling.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on October 12, 2017, 05:08:24 PM
Thanks guys!  :thumbsup:

Are the lights fitted to or rdcessed into the ceiling or suspended from it or some kind of substructure? You could say, "Overhead illumination was provided by recessed ceiling lights"  but that is a bit clumsy. As Davin said, "Overhead lighting", whether qualified by type or not, covers all. Qualification might be needed for technical - recessed ceiling lights give clear overhead space for cranes etc, or decorative, cosmetic descriptive purposes. Recessed, sealed lighting can also be designed to be more easily and hygenically cleaned.

Simple fluorescent lights attached to the ceiling.
Context important as well  :grin:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on October 12, 2017, 05:09:06 PM
Thanks guys!  :thumbsup:

Are the lights fitted to or rdcessed into the ceiling or suspended from it or some kind of substructure? You could say, "Overhead illumination was provided by recessed ceiling lights"  but that is a bit clumsy. As Davin said, "Overhead lighting", whether qualified by type or not, covers all. Qualification might be needed for technical - recessed ceiling lights give clear overhead space for cranes etc, or decorative, cosmetic descriptive purposes. Recessed, sealed lighting can also be designed to be more easily and hygenically cleaned.

Simple fluorescent lights attached to the ceiling.
Context important as well  :grin:

Yep, sorry about that.  :sidesmile:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 06, 2017, 09:13:01 PM
Please help me out here, the gears in my head are not turning smoothly today...can I say "The laboratory diagnosis is made, initially, by imaging methods"?

A diagnosis is made?
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 06, 2017, 09:30:22 PM
Please help me out here, the gears in my head are not turning smoothly today...can I say "The laboratory diagnosis is made, initially, by imaging methods"?

A diagnosis is made?

"arrived at"?

Example:

Quote
Who made your child’s diagnosis, how was it arrived at, and does it matter?

https://stemcollege.wordpress.com/2013/02/19/who-made-your-childs-diagnosis-how-was-it-arrived-at-and-does-it-matter/
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 06, 2017, 09:34:37 PM
Please help me out here, the gears in my head are not turning smoothly today...can I say "The laboratory diagnosis is made, initially, by imaging methods"?

A diagnosis is made?

"arrived at"?

Example:

Quote
Who made your child’s diagnosis, how was it arrived at, and does it matter?

https://stemcollege.wordpress.com/2013/02/19/who-made-your-childs-diagnosis-how-was-it-arrived-at-and-does-it-matter/

Excellent!  :notes:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 06, 2017, 09:50:48 PM
Also, could you call something a suspect alteration in an organ (bladder) which might indicate the growth of a tumour?

Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 06, 2017, 09:55:03 PM
I supposed you could also say, ", , , diagnosis was based on . . ." but can't find sny decent examples.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 06, 2017, 10:01:17 PM
Also, could you call something a suspect alteration in an organ (bladder) which might indicate the growth of a tumour?

Ouch, not so easy:

"possible" ?

But this could be a case where I might rearrange the whole sentence to avoid an awkward usage. " . . . it is/was suspected that the alteration(s) observed was/were due to the growth of a tumor . . ." is that makes sense in the context.

Ah, or does "suspect" here mean "unusual" or similar. !Context warning!!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 06, 2017, 10:08:41 PM
The phrase would be something like:

...These may show suspect changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations...

But suspect doesn't feel entirely right in this context. :notsure:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on November 06, 2017, 11:14:15 PM
The phrase would be something like:

...These may show suspect changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations...

But suspect doesn't feel entirely right in this context. :notsure:
The words they used with my MRI results were: "The findings are suspicious for..."
...These may show suspicious changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations...

 :shrug:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 06, 2017, 11:27:14 PM
The phrase would be something like:

...These may show suspect changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations...

But suspect doesn't feel entirely right in this context. :notsure:
The words they used with my MRI results were: "The findings are suspicious for..."
...These may show suspicious changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations...

 :shrug:

Yeah I think suspicious might be better. :smilenod:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 07, 2017, 04:47:38 AM
Yes, "sudpicious" is better as you now present the whole sentence.

The use of "growth" came to bother me because thst implies a change in appesrance, needing at least two separate observations.

Is the adjective actually needed?

"..These may show changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations... "

Are you directly observing the bladder or infering change from indirect methods? Is the confirmation be assured or is there a "may" or "can" or even "could" " be confirmed" in there?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on November 07, 2017, 05:52:34 AM
Yes, "sudpicious" is better as you now present the whole sentence.

The use of "growth" came to bother me because thst implies a change in appesrance, needing at least two separate observations.

Is the adjective actually needed?

"..These may show changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations... "


Are you directly observing the bladder or infering change from indirect methods? Is the confirmation be assured or is there a "may" or "can" or even "could" " be confirmed" in there?

...These may show suspicious changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations

"May show" and "suspicious changes" in the same sentence does show a lot of doubt.  :notsure:
But, the word, confirmed --state with confidence that the suspicion, (based on cystoscopic examination), is true.
Yes?  :eyebrow:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 07, 2017, 08:10:41 AM
Yes, "sudpicious" is better as you now present the whole sentence.

The use of "growth" came to bother me because thst implies a change in appesrance, needing at least two separate observations.

Is the adjective actually needed?

"..These may show changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations... "


Are you directly observing the bladder or infering change from indirect methods? Is the confirmation be assured or is there a "may" or "can" or even "could" " be confirmed" in there?

...These may show suspicious changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations

"May show" and "suspicious changes" in the same sentence does show a lot of doubt.  :notsure:
But, the word, confirmed --state with confidence that the suspicion, (based on cystoscopic examination), is true.
Yes?  :eyebrow:

A lot still depends on the context, Mags. If you are describing the "general" process of examination and testing then you should say that any non-specific symptoms may be due to malignant processes, you cannot be sure until definitive tests or examinations are carried out. Even if you are describing an examination in progress you cannot be sure about the cause of any visual or tactile changes from "normal" until these are confirmed by other means.

Doubt is only fully removed when testing shows that the symptoms are due to a specific cause with acceptable certainty.


When describing a scientific process, an expetimrnt, if the same results are obtained each time then there is not room for doubt. If testing a drug unkess one gets a 100% positive dvery time there is still doubt in the efficacy of that drug, all you can say is that it will be effective in x% of uses. Whivh x% is unknown. Losartsn potassium is routinely prescribed for cardiac conditions, but I was one of the 1:10 000 that suffered extremely debilitating side effects from it.

One day, when all our genomes are routinely registered at birth, such findings may be compared and those genetically prone to such problems not prescribed such drugs.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bad Penny II on November 07, 2017, 10:53:59 AM
Please help me out here, the gears in my head are not turning smoothly today...can I say "The laboratory diagnosis is made, initially, by imaging methods"?

A diagnosis is made?

The laboratory diagnosis is made, initially, by using imaging methods.[/color]

If you want to be fancy you could use "utilising" in stead.
It's like guns, (may they always be free praise the lord,) they don't do the murdering, they are utilised.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 07, 2017, 11:13:44 AM
Yes, "sudpicious" is better as you now present the whole sentence.

The use of "growth" came to bother me because thst implies a change in appesrance, needing at least two separate observations.

Is the adjective actually needed?

"..These may show changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations... "

Are you directly observing the bladder or infering change from indirect methods? Is the confirmation be assured or is there a "may" or "can" or even "could" " be confirmed" in there?


...These may show suspicious changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations

"May show" and "suspicious changes" in the same sentence does show a lot of doubt.  :notsure:
But, the word, confirmed --state with confidence that the suspicion, (based on cystoscopic examination), is true.
Yes?  :eyebrow:


The idea is that imaging techniques show suspicious changes in the bladder, and whether there's an actual growth or not may be confirmed later by cystoscopic examination.

And yes, I have to keep the adjective because it's there in the original. :bigspecs:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 07, 2017, 11:16:31 AM
Please help me out here, the gears in my head are not turning smoothly today...can I say "The laboratory diagnosis is made, initially, by imaging methods"?

A diagnosis is made?

The laboratory diagnosis is made, initially, by using imaging methods.[/color]

If you want to be fancy you could use "utilising" in stead.
It's like guns, (may they always be free praise the lord,) they don't do the murdering, they are utilised.

:grin: Grazie beaucoup!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 07, 2017, 11:24:22 AM
Yes, "sudpicious" is better as you now present the whole sentence.

The use of "growth" came to bother me because thst implies a change in appesrance, needing at least two separate observations.

Is the adjective actually needed?

"..These may show changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations... "

Are you directly observing the bladder or infering change from indirect methods? Is the confirmation be assured or is there a "may" or "can" or even "could" " be confirmed" in there?


...These may show suspicious changes in the bladder, which are confirmed by cystoscopic examinations

"May show" and "suspicious changes" in the same sentence does show a lot of doubt.  :notsure:
But, the word, confirmed --state with confidence that the suspicion, (based on cystoscopic examination), is true.
Yes?  :eyebrow:


The idea is that imaging techniques show suspicious changes in the bladder, and whether there's an actual growth or not may be confirmed later by cystoscopic examination.

And yes, I have to keep the adjective because it's there in the original. :bigspecs:

Ah! This is a quotation rather than a piece of your own writing? Or something you are paraphrasing, Silver?

Going back to Mag's comment about a lack of confidence the very word "suspicion" inplies a degree of "doubt until proven".
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 07, 2017, 11:32:10 AM
Ah! This is a quotation rather than a piece of your own writing? Or something you are paraphrasing, Silver?

Going back to Mag's comment about a lack of confidence the very word "suspicion" inplies a degree of "doubt until proven".

It's a chapter on bladder cancer that I'm translating for my aunt. It's erm...very interesting. So interesting it kept me awake last night.  :sidesmile:

I think suspicion sounds about right, then!  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 07, 2017, 12:19:54 PM
Ah! This is a quotation rather than a piece of your own writing? Or something you are paraphrasing, Silver?

Going back to Mag's comment about a lack of confidence the very word "suspicion" inplies a degree of "doubt until proven".

It's a chapter on bladder cancer that I'm translating for my aunt. It's erm...very interesting. So interesting it kept me awake last night.  :sidesmile:

I think suspicion sounds about right, then!  :thumbsup:
As if you do not have enough to do during the day! Don't burn out, Fernanda!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 07, 2017, 12:38:06 PM
Ah! This is a quotation rather than a piece of your own writing? Or something you are paraphrasing, Silver?

Going back to Mag's comment about a lack of confidence the very word "suspicion" inplies a degree of "doubt until proven".

It's a chapter on bladder cancer that I'm translating for my aunt. It's erm...very interesting. So interesting it kept me awake last night.  :sidesmile:

I think suspicion sounds about right, then!  :thumbsup:
As if you do not have enough to do during the day! Don't burn out, Fernanda!

I'll be fine, practically all I did since Friday was rest. :smilenod:

I'm still a wage slave, remember? ;) Though technically I don't get any actual wage anymore, just trying to get some change here and there.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 07, 2017, 12:42:01 PM
Ah! This is a quotation rather than a piece of your own writing? Or something you are paraphrasing, Silver?

Going back to Mag's comment about a lack of confidence the very word "suspicion" inplies a degree of "doubt until proven".

It's a chapter on bladder cancer that I'm translating for my aunt. It's erm...very interesting. So interesting it kept me awake last night.  :sidesmile:

I think suspicion sounds about right, then!  :thumbsup:
As if you do not have enough to do during the day! Don't burn out, Fernanda!

I'll be fine, practically all I did since Friday was rest. :smilenod:

I'm still a wage slave, remember? ;) Though technically I don't get any actual wage anymore, just trying to get some change here and there.

Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 07, 2017, 01:00:16 PM
Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.

Yes, she is. I do too much for free already! :P

She could have learnt English but chose to learn French instead, so now she has to pay to have her papers and chapters translated... :P But for anyone in the sciences it's a bit of a no-brainer which language one should opt for.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 07, 2017, 01:11:05 PM
Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.

Yes, she is. I do too much for free already! :P

She could have learnt English but chose to learn French instead, so now she has to pay to have her papers and chapters translated... :P But for anyone in the sciences it's a bit of a no-brainer which language one should opt for.

Yes, despite the fact that French and German science has always been top notch English seems to have become a bit of a lingua frsnca - even before those Americans got their oar in! And despite the sizes of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and trade relationships. That is why I chose  the origins, borrowings, gifts, current dominance - and possible future - of English as my college research project.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 07, 2017, 01:28:20 PM
Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.

Yes, she is. I do too much for free already! :P

She could have learnt English but chose to learn French instead, so now she has to pay to have her papers and chapters translated... :P But for anyone in the sciences it's a bit of a no-brainer which language one should opt for.

Yes, despite the fact that French and German science has always been top notch English seems to have become a bit of a lingua frsnca - even before those Americans got their oar in! And despite the sizes of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and trade relationships. That is why I chose  the origins, borrowings, gifts, current dominance - and possible future - of English as my college research project.

In science it seems to be a recent thing, though. In Newton's day it was Latin that was the language of the sciences, which doesn't make too much sense if you ask me, being a dead language and all. Probably linked to the Church in some way, though by then science had already begun to free itself from the clutches of that institution. In the 19th century it was French's turn in the spotlight, possibly due to the enlightenment. When did English become so important in that scenario? :notsure: There was the Industrial Revolution, I don't know...
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 07, 2017, 02:47:48 PM
Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.

Yes, she is. I do too much for free already! :P

She could have learnt English but chose to learn French instead, so now she has to pay to have her papers and chapters translated... :P But for anyone in the sciences it's a bit of a no-brainer which language one should opt for.

Yes, despite the fact that French and German science has always been top notch English seems to have become a bit of a lingua frsnca - even before those Americans got their oar in! And despite the sizes of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and trade relationships. That is why I chose  the origins, borrowings, gifts, current dominance - and possible future - of English as my college research project.

In science it seems to be a recent thing, though. In Newton's day it was Latin that was the language of the sciences, which doesn't make too much sense if you ask me, being a dead language and all. Probably linked to the Church in some way, though by then science had already begun to free itself from the clutches of that institution. In the 19th century it was French's turn in the spotlight, possibly due to the enlightenment. When did English become so important in that scenario? :notsure: There was the Industrial Revolution, I don't know...

It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on November 07, 2017, 07:47:31 PM
suspicious is better than suspect in this context
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 08, 2017, 11:48:52 PM
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 08, 2017, 11:49:19 PM
suspicious is better than suspect in this context

Tanks! :grin:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on November 09, 2017, 12:58:22 AM
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)

In days of yore a BBC bigwig said that the word "television", being a mixture of Greek and Latin, could not be tolerated and was bound to be changed.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 09, 2017, 04:15:46 PM
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)

In days of yore a BBC bigwig said that the word "television", being a mixture of Greek and Latin, could not be tolerated and was bound to be changed.

 ::) Weird purists...
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 05, 2017, 10:43:58 PM
Can I say "considerations raised in the revision of the paper" instead of considerations pointed out..."? I don't want to use 'pointed out' as it seems rather informal. Is it? :notsure:

It's for a response to the editor of a journal.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on December 05, 2017, 10:58:14 PM
I agree that "raised" is somewhat more elegant language, but I don't think that "pointed out" is notably informal. However, I'd phrase it "considerations raised in regard to the revision of the paper".
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 05, 2017, 11:03:42 PM
I agree that "raised" is somewhat more elegant language, but I don't think that "pointed out" is notably informal. However, I'd phrase it "considerations raised in regard to the revision of the paper".

Thanks! :grin:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on December 05, 2017, 11:10:28 PM
 :boaterhat: Any time.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Papasito Bruno on December 06, 2017, 02:44:46 PM
You raised a good point!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 12, 2017, 01:26:11 AM
Ok, so today as I was helping my mother close the school for the day and just after had closed the door after her students a woman, normal-looking but unfamiliar, rang the doorbell, cellphone in hand. My mother let her in, possibly thinking she was going to ask for information about classes and so on, but instead she held up her cellphone to our faces and asked us what her boyfriend could have meant by the following text message:

"Portuguese women knows (sic) how to pet a man."

:notsure: Pet a man? The thought of a dogman hybrid instantly came to mind (I'm more of a dog person). Maybe a werewolf? :chin:

Anyway, my question is, does that make sense? Can 'pet' be used for people?

The stranger said that her boyfriend was a native English speaker but his English was intermediate at best, riddled with grammatical errors. :nu-uh: Seems very strange to me. I gave the woman a look, and hopefully she understood.


Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: No one on December 12, 2017, 01:40:01 AM
Not sure what it could have meant. Perhaps, he was using a voice to text, that just completely garbled what he said, then he sent it without realizing.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 12, 2017, 01:42:01 AM
Not sure what it could have meant. Perhaps, he was using a voice to text, that just completely garbled what he said, then he sent it without realizing.

Pat a man, perhaps? :lol:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 12, 2017, 01:53:18 AM
I'm really intrigued because it looks like something Google Translate would come up with.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on December 12, 2017, 01:56:32 AM
There is a term "petting" which is well out of fashion now I think, and describes basically foreplay stopping short of actual sexual intercourse. Most often used in the phrase "heavy petting." I doubt that's what the text was about, but you never know.  ;D

"Petting: what is it and what does it involve" | NetDoctor (http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2231/what-is-petting/)

Quote
Petting is an old (mid-20th century) term that means stimulating another person's sex organs or breasts – usually with your hand or mouth, and normally while kissing them.

Petting actually an American word – originally meaning stroking or caressing (as one would stroke a 'pet' cat).

It is more or less the equivalent of the U.S. terms 'necking' and 'making out', both of which originated in the 1940s.

There was no equivalent word in 'polite' (British) English, so the US word 'petting' gradually became used worldwide during the late 20th Century and is still employed – particularly by middle-aged people.

[Continues (of course) (http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2231/what-is-petting/)]
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 12, 2017, 02:08:03 AM
There is a term "petting" which is well out of fashion now I think, and describes basically foreplay stopping short of actual sexual intercourse. Most often used in the phrase "heavy petting." I doubt that's what the text was about, but you never know.  ;D

"Petting: what is it and what does it involve" | NetDoctor (http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2231/what-is-petting/)

Quote
Petting is an old (mid-20th century) term that means stimulating another person's sex organs or breasts – usually with your hand or mouth, and normally while kissing them.

Petting actually an American word – originally meaning stroking or caressing (as one would stroke a 'pet' cat).

It is more or less the equivalent of the U.S. terms 'necking' and 'making out', both of which originated in the 1940s.

There was no equivalent word in 'polite' (British) English, so the US word 'petting' gradually became used worldwide during the late 20th Century and is still employed – particularly by middle-aged people.

[Continues (of course) (http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2231/what-is-petting/)]

Well, you learn something new everyday! :grin:

It would have been hilarious if they were sexting, but based on the snippet of conversation she showed us, I'd say something like 'fondle' is not what he was talking about. However, you never know with some people...

She was middle-aged so perhaps he was too. :notsure:

I don't know anymore. :lol:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on December 12, 2017, 08:27:36 AM
There is a term "petting" which is well out of fashion now I think, and describes basically foreplay stopping short of actual sexual intercourse. Most often used in the phrase "heavy petting." I doubt that's what the text was about, but you never know.  ;D

"Petting: what is it and what does it involve" | NetDoctor (http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2231/what-is-petting/)

Quote
Petting is an old (mid-20th century) term that means stimulating another person's sex organs or breasts – usually with your hand or mouth, and normally while kissing them.

Petting actually an American word – originally meaning stroking or caressing (as one would stroke a 'pet' cat).

It is more or less the equivalent of the U.S. terms 'necking' and 'making out', both of which originated in the 1940s.

There was no equivalent word in 'polite' (British) English, so the US word 'petting' gradually became used worldwide during the late 20th Century and is still employed – particularly by middle-aged people.

[Continues (of course) (http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2231/what-is-petting/)]

Well, you learn something new everyday! :grin:

It would have been hilarious if they were sexting, but based on the snippet of conversation she showed us, I'd say something like 'fondle' is not what he was talking about. However, you never know with some people...

She was middle-aged so perhaps he was too. :notsure:

I don't know anymore. :lol:
In "The Hitch-hikers' Guide to the Galaxy" a "Whop!" sound is heard. This signifies the establishment of a "Not-My-Problem-Field", very useful in such circumstances.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 12, 2017, 10:10:30 AM
There is a term "petting" which is well out of fashion now I think, and describes basically foreplay stopping short of actual sexual intercourse. Most often used in the phrase "heavy petting." I doubt that's what the text was about, but you never know.  ;D

"Petting: what is it and what does it involve" | NetDoctor (http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2231/what-is-petting/)

Quote
Petting is an old (mid-20th century) term that means stimulating another person's sex organs or breasts – usually with your hand or mouth, and normally while kissing them.

Petting actually an American word – originally meaning stroking or caressing (as one would stroke a 'pet' cat).

It is more or less the equivalent of the U.S. terms 'necking' and 'making out', both of which originated in the 1940s.

There was no equivalent word in 'polite' (British) English, so the US word 'petting' gradually became used worldwide during the late 20th Century and is still employed – particularly by middle-aged people.

[Continues (of course) (http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/healthy-living/sexual-health/a2231/what-is-petting/)]

Well, you learn something new everyday! :grin:

It would have been hilarious if they were sexting, but based on the snippet of conversation she showed us, I'd say something like 'fondle' is not what he was talking about. However, you never know with some people...

She was middle-aged so perhaps he was too. :notsure:

I don't know anymore. :lol:
In "The Hitch-hikers' Guide to the Galaxy" a "Whop!" sound is heard. This signifies the establishment of a "Not-My-Problem-Field", very useful in such circumstances.

:lol:

Yeah. :grin:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Icarus on December 13, 2017, 01:59:27 AM
Rec must be older than I thought if he recognizes the colloquial term "petting".  I suspect that that term was somewhat confined to regional usage. It does have mild sexual overtones when applied to human behavior toward another human. When applied to an animal, such as your domestic dog or cat, then the word stems from the root word pet and has no sexual connotations. The word pet can be a noun or a verb. The word petting is either a verb or sometimes an adjective or adverb....choose your poison.

 A parallel descriptive term used way back in time was "Boodling" which had the same meaning as limited petting.  That term is now superseded by  "Making out" .  Making out has more than one implication and may not be as limited in meaning as the older vernaculars.  The American language is a real mess that is sure to confuse speakers of other languages.  We invent new words without regard for common sense.  How about the long past valley girl expression for surprise; "Gag me with a spoon"?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on December 13, 2017, 08:21:36 AM
Rec must be older than I thought if he recognizes the colloquial term "petting".  I suspect that that term was somewhat confined to regional usage. It does have mild sexual overtones when applied to human behavior toward another human. When applied to an animal, such as your domestic dog or cat, then the word stems from the root word pet and has no sexual connotations. The word pet can be a noun or a verb. The word petting is either a verb or sometimes an adjective or adverb....choose your poison.

 A parallel descriptive term used way back in time was "Boodling" which had the same meaning as limited petting.  That term is now superseded by  "Making out" .  Making out has more than one implication and may not be as limited in meaning as the older vernaculars.  The American language is a real mess that is sure to confuse speakers of other languages.  We invent new words without regard for common sense.  How about the long past valley girl expression for surprise; "Gag me with a spoon"?

Yeah, I well remember "petting"! And "spooning".

One  etymology site (https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/39179/what-is-the-origin-of-the-phrase-gag-me-with-a-spoon) has "gag me with a spoon" as an expression of disgust:
Quote
The phrase is used as an expression of disgust. A typical usage from the online slang dictionary. Oh my gosh, gag me with a spoon. That were the ugliest shoes I've ever seen! The phrase also appears in Frank Zappa's song, Valley girl.

Is this a hang on from when the gag reaction was invoked by depressing the very back of the tongue with the bowl of a spoon? The Aussies have some interesting (mis)uses for English as well.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bad Penny II on December 13, 2017, 09:08:43 AM
Rec must be older than I thought if he recognizes the colloquial term "petting"

Na, it's in the song.

Quote
Touch-A, Touch-A, Touch Me

I was feeling done in, couldn't win
I'd only ever kissed before (you mean she?) (uh-huh)
I thought there's no use getting into heavy petting
It only leads to trouble and seat-wetting
Now all I want to know is how to go
I've tasted blood and I want more (more, more, more)
I'll put up no resistance, I want to stay the distance
I've got an itch to scratch, I need assistance
Touch-a touch-a touch-a touch me, I wanna be dirty
Thrill me, chill me, fulfil me
Creature of the night
Then if anything grows while you pose
I'll oil you up and rub you down (down, down, down)
And that's just one small fraction of the main attraction
You need a friendly hand and I need action
Touch-a touch-a touch-a touch me, I wanna be dirty
Thrill me,…

If people didn't know what petting was what would they think "heavy petting" is?
Anyway what a person does with a consenting Labrador is no concern of mine.


Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 13, 2017, 08:58:15 PM
If people didn't know what petting was what would they think "heavy petting" is?
Anyway what a person does with a consenting Labrador is no concern of mine.

If Recusant hadn't mentioned what it was I would have innocently thought it was a more vigorous form of petting.  ;D
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 25, 2017, 11:08:42 PM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on December 25, 2017, 11:32:30 PM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 25, 2017, 11:38:01 PM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:

:lol: I should totally put that! :P
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on December 25, 2017, 11:55:05 PM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:

:lol: I should totally put that! :P

 :lol:

Or...
Household management executive.
Or...
Nonprofit household management executive.
Or...
Assistant household manager.

Or...
No, I should stop here.  :notsure:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 01:08:38 AM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:

:lol: I should totally put that! :P

 :lol:

Or...
Household management executive.
Or...
Nonprofit household management executive.
Or...
Assistant household manager.

Or...
No, I should stop here.  :notsure:

:notes:

Miracle worker? Maybe sounds too religious... :notsure:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on December 26, 2017, 03:11:15 AM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:

:lol: I should totally put that! :P

 :lol:

Or...
Household management executive.
Or...
Nonprofit household management executive.
Or...
Assistant household manager.

Or...
No, I should stop here.  :notsure:

:notes:

Miracle worker? Maybe sounds too religious... :notsure:

A little bit.  :grin:

...But seriously, I think homemaker is another option. It doesn't include the word, wife as in housewife.  :shrug:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 03:25:19 AM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:

:lol: I should totally put that! :P

 :lol:

Or...
Household management executive.
Or...
Nonprofit household management executive.
Or...
Assistant household manager.

Or...
No, I should stop here.  :notsure:

:notes:

Miracle worker? Maybe sounds too religious... :notsure:

A little bit.  :grin:

...But seriously, I think homemaker is another option. It doesn't include the word, wife as in housewife.  :shrug:

I was about so suggest homemaker as well.

To and English speaker the words housewife and midwife do not suggest that the person is necessarily married, but I can see that the wife part can throw non-English speakers.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on December 26, 2017, 03:40:21 AM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:

:lol: I should totally put that! :P

 :lol:

Or...
Household management executive.
Or...
Nonprofit household management executive.
Or...
Assistant household manager.

Or...
No, I should stop here.  :notsure:

:notes:

Miracle worker? Maybe sounds too religious... :notsure:

A little bit.  :grin:

...But seriously, I think homemaker is another option. It doesn't include the word, wife as in housewife.  :shrug:

I was about so suggest homemaker as well.

To and English speaker the words housewife and midwife do not suggest that the person is necessarily married, but I can see that the wife part can throw non-English speakers.

Midwife, yes, there's another word, right there.
It can mean: a person (typically a woman) trained to assist women in childbirth.



...And

Occupying a middle place or position and wife?  :eyebrow:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 03:44:58 AM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:

:lol: I should totally put that! :P

 :lol:

Or...
Household management executive.
Or...
Nonprofit household management executive.
Or...
Assistant household manager.

Or...
No, I should stop here.  :notsure:

:notes:

Miracle worker? Maybe sounds too religious... :notsure:

A little bit.  :grin:

...But seriously, I think homemaker is another option. It doesn't include the word, wife as in housewife.  :shrug:

I was about so suggest homemaker as well.

To and English speaker the words housewife and midwife do not suggest that the person is necessarily married, but I can see that the wife part can throw non-English speakers.

Midwife, yes, there's another word, right there.
It can mean: a person (typically a woman) trained to assist women in childbirth.



...And

Occupying a middle place or position and wife?  :eyebrow:

 ;D
This is why etymology is such an interesting subject.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on December 26, 2017, 03:57:28 AM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A domestic goddess? :scratch:

:lol: I should totally put that! :P

 :lol:

Or...
Household management executive.
Or...
Nonprofit household management executive.
Or...
Assistant household manager.

Or...
No, I should stop here.  :notsure:

:notes:

Miracle worker? Maybe sounds too religious... :notsure:

A little bit.  :grin:

...But seriously, I think homemaker is another option. It doesn't include the word, wife as in housewife.  :shrug:

I was about so suggest homemaker as well.

To and English speaker the words housewife and midwife do not suggest that the person is necessarily married, but I can see that the wife part can throw non-English speakers.

Midwife, yes, there's another word, right there.
It can mean: a person (typically a woman) trained to assist women in childbirth.



...And

Occupying a middle place or position and wife?  :eyebrow:

 ;D
This is why etymology is such an interesting subject.


 ;D
Yes, a lot can get lost in the translation/interpretation.

...And sometimes one sees things in the words...that maybe one shouldn't.  :shifty:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 04:06:26 AM
;D
Yes, a lot can get lost in the translation/interpretation.

...And sometimes one sees things in the words...that maybe one shouldn't.  :shifty:

A good example is the difference between mincemeat and mince: there is no meat in mincemeat, only fruit. Mince on its own is minced meat.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on December 26, 2017, 04:12:36 AM
;D
Yes, a lot can get lost in the translation/interpretation.

...And sometimes one sees things in the words...that maybe one shouldn't.  :shifty:

A good example is the difference between mincemeat and mince: there is no meat in mincemeat, only fruit. Mince on its own is minced meat.

 :suspicious:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Icarus on December 26, 2017, 04:49:55 AM
A housewife is generally thought of as the keeper of the domicile.  I can accurately refer to the neighbor lady as a housewife, which she is.  She is married but not married to me.  She is both a housewife and a wife, just not my wife and she does not take care of my house.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on December 26, 2017, 05:14:52 AM
;D
Yes, a lot can get lost in the translation/interpretation.

...And sometimes one sees things in the words...that maybe one shouldn't.  :shifty:

A good example is the difference between mincemeat and mince: there is no meat in mincemeat, only fruit. Mince on its own is minced meat.

Quote
Mincemeat is a mixture of chopped dried fruit, distilled spirits and spices, and sometimes beef suet, beef, or venison. Originally, mincemeat always contained meat.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mincemeat
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 05:27:25 AM
;D
Yes, a lot can get lost in the translation/interpretation.

...And sometimes one sees things in the words...that maybe one shouldn't.  :shifty:

A good example is the difference between mincemeat and mince: there is no meat in mincemeat, only fruit. Mince on its own is minced meat.

Quote
Mincemeat is a mixture of chopped dried fruit, distilled spirits and spices, and sometimes beef suet, beef, or venison. Originally, mincemeat always contained meat.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mincemeat

This tangent has a nice Christmassy connection.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 05:57:08 PM
I'm familiar with midwife but didn't see the connection. Thanks for pointing it out!  :thumbsup:

I like homemaker. :smilenod: It's not as common as housewife though, is it? :notsure:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 05:58:03 PM
;D
Yes, a lot can get lost in the translation/interpretation.

...And sometimes one sees things in the words...that maybe one shouldn't.  :shifty:

A good example is the difference between mincemeat and mince: there is no meat in mincemeat, only fruit. Mince on its own is minced meat.

Can there be...chocolate in mincemeat as well? :shifty:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 06:10:08 PM
;D
Yes, a lot can get lost in the translation/interpretation.

...And sometimes one sees things in the words...that maybe one shouldn't.  :shifty:

A good example is the difference between mincemeat and mince: there is no meat in mincemeat, only fruit. Mince on its own is minced meat.

Can there be...chocolate in mincemeat as well? :shifty:

That would be the work of the Devil.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 06:37:44 PM
;D
Yes, a lot can get lost in the translation/interpretation.

...And sometimes one sees things in the words...that maybe one shouldn't.  :shifty:

A good example is the difference between mincemeat and mince: there is no meat in mincemeat, only fruit. Mince on its own is minced meat.

Can there be...chocolate in mincemeat as well? :shifty:

That would be the work of the Devil.

:devil:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 06:44:35 PM
I have another one for you fine folks:

If two or more people are staying together in a maternity ward room, is it correct to say that they are "in joint accommodation"?
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 06:58:20 PM
I have another one for you fine folks:

If two or more people are staying together in a maternity ward room, is it correct to say that they are "in joint accommodation"?

I am denser than osmium, so I'm afraid I don't understand the question. Please elaborate.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 07:13:49 PM
I have another one for you fine folks:

If two or more people are staying together in a maternity ward room, is it correct to say that they are "in joint accommodation"?

I am denser than osmium, so I'm afraid I don't understand the question. Please elaborate.

My bad, I'll try to elaborate.

In hospital wards when more than one person stay in a room (separate beds of course) can you say those people are in joint accommodation? Or shared accommodation? :notsure:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on December 26, 2017, 07:14:53 PM
I have another one for you fine folks:

If two or more people are staying together in a maternity ward room, is it correct to say that they are "in joint accommodation"?

Need a bit more context. 'In joint accomodation' is ambiguious and could mean living together.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on December 26, 2017, 07:16:29 PM
If many people are in a ward, they simply 'shared a ward' together or with.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 07:19:55 PM
Shared accommodation sounds good to me.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 07:23:45 PM
I have another one for you fine folks:

If two or more people are staying together in a maternity ward room, is it correct to say that they are "in joint accommodation"?

Need a bit more context. 'In joint accomodation' is ambiguious and could mean living together.

If many people are in a ward, they simply 'shared a ward' together or with.

Noted.  :)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 07:24:30 PM
Shared accommodation sounds good to me.

Dankie!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 07:27:41 PM
Shared accommodation sounds good to me.

Dankie!

You're welcome and that's impressive!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 07:31:30 PM
Shared accommodation sounds good to me.

Dankie!

You're welcome and that's impressive!

:lol: Not really. I've been to a number of places in South Africa (a long time ago) and that's pretty much all I picked up there.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 26, 2017, 07:39:23 PM
Shared accommodation sounds good to me.

Dankie!

You're welcome and that's impressive!

:lol: Not really. I've been to a number of places in South Africa (a long time ago) and that's pretty much all I picked up there.

My first language is English, but most people here are pretty bi-,  tri- or multilingual.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 26, 2017, 07:55:05 PM
Shared accommodation sounds good to me.

Dankie!

You're welcome and that's impressive!

:lol: Not really. I've been to a number of places in South Africa (a long time ago) and that's pretty much all I picked up there.

My first language is English, but most people here are pretty bi-,  tri- or multilingual.

I guess that's what you get when lots of different peoples with their own languages and cultures live in a country?

The most time I spent was in Pretoria, did you know that Jacaranda trees are originally from Brazil? Especially from the central-western region, which suffers from seasonal drought as well. Those trees seem to be well adapted to the climate there.

I was very impressed. If I could, I would go to South Africa again.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-pfwwvfX5fg4/VVwzH7CsXaI/AAAAAAAAASo/thctd6QDu2w/s1600/Pretoria-Jacaranda-trees-Tunnel-004.jpg)

:tellmemore:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on December 26, 2017, 09:36:23 PM
My bad, I'll try to elaborate.

In hospital wards when more than one person stay in a room (separate beds of course) can you say those people are in joint accommodation? Or shared accommodation? :notsure:

A semi-private room?
"People are in a semi-private room?"

Or, "People are in a multi-occupancy patient room?"

 :shrug:

"People are in shared accommodation." --That's good too.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Icarus on December 26, 2017, 11:50:26 PM
You said that the two were in a maternity ward.  In that case, Joint accommodation may have some undesired connotations for dirty old men.  :-[  Hint: "Joint" is one of the many slang expressions that refers to the penis) 
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 27, 2017, 03:18:42 AM
Shared accommodation sounds good to me.

Dankie!

You're welcome and that's impressive!

:lol: Not really. I've been to a number of places in South Africa (a long time ago) and that's pretty much all I picked up there.

My first language is English, but most people here are pretty bi-,  tri- or multilingual.

I guess that's what you get when lots of different peoples with their own languages and cultures live in a country?

The most time I spent was in Pretoria, did you know that Jacaranda trees are originally from Brazil? Especially from the central-western region, which suffers from seasonal drought as well. Those trees seem to be well adapted to the climate there.

I was very impressed. If I could, I would go to South Africa again.

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-pfwwvfX5fg4/VVwzH7CsXaI/AAAAAAAAASo/thctd6QDu2w/s1600/Pretoria-Jacaranda-trees-Tunnel-004.jpg)

:tellmemore:

Many parts of Pretoria look like that every spring. Pretoria and Johannesburg are both very green cities, with Johannesburg classified as a forest.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 27, 2017, 11:38:17 AM
My bad, I'll try to elaborate.

In hospital wards when more than one person stay in a room (separate beds of course) can you say those people are in joint accommodation? Or shared accommodation? :notsure:

A semi-private room?
"People are in a semi-private room?"

Or, "People are in a multi-occupancy patient room?"

 :shrug:

"People are in shared accommodation." --That's good too.

Too many options to choose from! :lol:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 27, 2017, 11:38:52 AM
You said that the two were in a maternity ward.  In that case, Joint accommodation may have some undesired connotations for dirty old men.  :-[  Hint: "Joint" is one of the many slang expressions that refers to the penis)

 :o

I did not know that...
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 27, 2017, 11:41:34 AM
...with Johannesburg classified as a forest.

Interesting. I only passed though downtown Joburg and would describe it more like an urban jungle. :grin:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on December 27, 2017, 12:16:10 PM
You said that the two were in a maternity ward.  In that case, Joint accommodation may have some undesired connotations for dirty old men.  :-[  Hint: "Joint" is one of the many slang expressions that refers to the penis)

 :o

I did not know that...

Did you want to ?

:D

Might have to start a "Euphemism for penis" thread just for your education.

 :devil:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 27, 2017, 12:28:05 PM
You said that the two were in a maternity ward.  In that case, Joint accommodation may have some undesired connotations for dirty old men.  :-[  Hint: "Joint" is one of the many slang expressions that refers to the penis)

 :o

I did not know that...

Did you want to ?

:D

Might have to start a "Euphemism for penis" thread just for your education.

 :devil:

I want to know everything! :lol:

Go on, I dare ya. :devil:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on December 27, 2017, 12:35:47 PM
You said that the two were in a maternity ward.  In that case, Joint accommodation may have some undesired connotations for dirty old men.  :-[  Hint: "Joint" is one of the many slang expressions that refers to the penis)

 :o

I did not know that...

Did you want to ?

:D

Might have to start a "Euphemism for penis" thread just for your education.

 :devil:

I want to know everything! :lol:

Go on, I dare ya. :devil:

OK!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 27, 2017, 01:01:47 PM
You said that the two were in a maternity ward.  In that case, Joint accommodation may have some undesired connotations for dirty old men.  :-[  Hint: "Joint" is one of the many slang expressions that refers to the penis)

 :o

I did not know that...

Did you want to ?

:D

Might have to start a "Euphemism for penis" thread just for your education.

 :devil:

I want to know everything! :lol:

Go on, I dare ya. :devil:

OK!

:lol: If anyone opposes, we blame Icarus. :devil:

 :P
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 27, 2017, 01:33:26 PM
...with Johannesburg classified as a forest.

Interesting. I only passed though downtown Joburg and would describe it more like an urban jungle. :grin:

You saw the worst part of the city. The old central business district of Johannesburg with the tall buildings is only a small part of of the city, which is more than 1700 square kilometers in size. Much of the rest of the city and the suburbs are estimated to contain about 10 million trees. This is a typical scene in the Northern suburbs, where I live.
(https://i.imgur.com/pV7Z6G4.jpg)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bad Penny II on December 27, 2017, 03:02:23 PM

(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-pfwwvfX5fg4/VVwzH7CsXaI/AAAAAAAAASo/thctd6QDu2w/s1600/Pretoria-Jacaranda-trees-Tunnel-004.jpg)

We've got those.
There's a town a bit north, they have an annual jacaranda festival.
A guy from there wrote a song inspired, at least initially by them.
Jacaranda is hard to roll into song so he changed it to flame trees.

We had one in the backyard, it was my favourite climbing tree.
One day I pissed off an older brother, ran, jumped into my jacaranda
Jump works well with jac, maybe he never thought of that.


I heard Lou appreciate the local factory out of worker line.








Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Papasito Bruno on December 27, 2017, 08:47:39 PM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:

"Domestic engineer".
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on December 27, 2017, 09:00:04 PM
What do you call a housewife who isn't a wife?  :scratch:
A widow.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 18, 2018, 10:26:19 PM
Ok, I've run into the worst case scenario: the dreaded obscure term for something that doesn't even turn up more than one Google hit in the original language it's written in. The words I searched for are "comorbidades sorológicas"(as is in the original). "Sorológica" is "serological" and "comorbidades" is "comorbidities", except the original in Portuguese doesn't seem to be commonly used in the biomedical sciences.  :picard facepalm: It would be something along those lines but I'm having trouble finding the equivalent in English. 

 :query:

According to the paper, diseases that fall within that categorisation are HIV, hepatitis A and C, for instance. I'm assuming that it refers to diseases with markers that show up in a blood test (serology = blood serum).

Thoughts?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Icarus on March 19, 2018, 12:32:07 AM
Fernanda try Wictionary.com.   There is no posted definition of the words but there is a request for subscribers to respond, hopefully with definition.  It is not clear whether the words are English, Spanish, Portugese or Swahili.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 19, 2018, 01:14:48 AM
Fernanda try Wictionary.com.   There is no posted definition of the words but there is a request for subscribers to respond, hopefully with definition.  It is not clear whether the words are English, Spanish, Portugese or Swahili.

Yes, wiktionary is useful. Thanks, Icarus! :smilenod:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on March 19, 2018, 01:40:52 AM
Could you give the sentence in which it's found? Any context at all would be helpful. If the author is discussing diseases that are commonly found through serum tests to be infecting the same person for instance, you could keep both terms and make a slight change to clarify it in English-- "sereologically revealed comorbidities" or something along those lines.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on March 19, 2018, 07:44:36 AM
Is it the problem that there are articles that use both words but not the specific phrase "comorbidades sorológicas" ? That, efen in English, the two words together are obscure in meaning (jargonistic), even meaningless?

Recusant's "implant" does seem to make more sense.

Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 19, 2018, 11:22:50 AM
Ok, so worst case scenario meets worst nightmare: the words "comorbidades sorológicas'' pop up in several places of the paper.  Good news is, it does clarify it to mean what I thought, they are comorbid diseases, or diseases that co-occur with others, that can be revealed through a blood test.

Some more context:

The paper is on morbid obesity and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. The author mentions a few exclusion criteria for the study, one of which is having tested positive for comorbid diseases such as HIV, hepatitis A or C.

It seems some sort of patchwork is indeed necessary here! :lol: This pic turned up on my Facebook feed, and it describes how I feel right now:

(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/29424991_1756645794394702_7779780225942701746_n.jpg?oh=ffdd91caa277bbaabe80216473c662f2&oe=5B2C3E8B)

 :o

Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 19, 2018, 11:25:45 AM
Is it the problem that there are articles that use both words but not the specific phrase "comorbidades sorológicas" ? That, efen in English, the two words together are obscure in meaning (jargonistic), even meaningless?

Recusant's "implant" does seem to make more sense.

Thing is, even in Portuguese it seems like an odd juxtaposition of words. I've never seen it before (which doesn't necessarily mean anything) but not even Google seems to know what it is exactly. :lol: 
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on March 19, 2018, 12:45:30 PM
We seem back to people having decided on a private redefinition of a word, or phrase. They then, in the writing process, get so used to this they make the unconsciius assumption everyone else understands what they are talking about! Or perhaps consciously set out to promote propagate their pet invented pgrase or context. Philosophy books sometimes have more explanatory footnotes for this than subject text.

Seen this many times. Probably done it meself!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on March 19, 2018, 12:53:27 PM
Can you contact the author for help?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 19, 2018, 05:45:27 PM
Can you contact the author for help?

I have, no answer yet.  :(
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 19, 2018, 05:50:21 PM
We seem back to people having decided on a private redefinition of a word, or phrase. They then, in the writing process, get so used to this they make the unconsciius assumption everyone else understands what they are talking about! Or perhaps consciously set out to promote propagate their pet invented pgrase or context. Philosophy books sometimes have more explanatory footnotes for this than subject text.

Seen this many times. Probably done it meself!

That's why it's a good idea to let others read what you've written, they can often point out such things you aren't even aware of! There are a few technical mistakes in this paper I'm translating, such as a sentence in the Introduction saying that adipose (fatty) tissue is an organ -- which it is not.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on March 19, 2018, 06:37:09 PM
That's why it's a good idea to let others read what you've written, they can often point out such things you aren't even aware of!

Good policy. Back in the 80s I knew that I had gained my bosses confidence because he asked me to read a draft report, though it was on work that I had done. Could find no technical problems but corrected his grammar and syntax!

There are a few technical mistakes in this paper I'm translating, such as a sentence in the Introduction saying that adipose (fatty) tissue is an organ -- which it is not.
Quote
Fat 'is an organ' say scientists
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/923153.stm

(Thought I had heard that idea before.)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 19, 2018, 07:20:11 PM
There are a few technical mistakes in this paper I'm translating, such as a sentence in the Introduction saying that adipose (fatty) tissue is an organ -- which it is not.
Quote
Fat 'is an organ' say scientists
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/923153.stm

(Thought I had heard that idea before.)

Fat is an organ but it is made up multiple fatty tissues, much like skin is also an organ and is made up of several different tissues.

I had misread what the author had written, but it is in fact correct. What initially confused me (perhaps because of my training) is why the author called it 'tecido adiposo' (adipose tissue in the singular) and not 'tecidos adiposos' (adipose tissues')?  It's a technical issue, and I am just nit-picking since an organ is classically called an organ when it is made up of more than one tissue with a similar function.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jumbojak on March 20, 2018, 12:31:26 AM
Does anyone else find it funny that OldGit is now listed as the creator of this thread? Gives an interesting perspective on the past and how future generations may view history. A new member might click on this, see his name and think he was someone with an ironic handle looking to improve his command of the English language. Forum archaeologists in future decades will have a tough time making sense of who we were and what we were really saying.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 20, 2018, 12:41:10 AM
^ :snicker:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on March 20, 2018, 05:38:12 AM
There are a few technical mistakes in this paper I'm translating, such as a sentence in the Introduction saying that adipose (fatty) tissue is an organ -- which it is not.
Quote
Fat 'is an organ' say scientists
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/923153.stm

(Thought I had heard that idea before.)

Fat is an organ but it is made up multiple fatty tissues, much like skin is also an organ and is made up of several different tissues.

I had misread what the author had written, but it is in fact correct. What initially confused me (perhaps because of my training) is why the author called it 'tecido adiposo' (adipose tissue in the singular) and not 'tecidos adiposos' (adipose tissues')?  It's a technical issue, and I am just nit-picking since an organ is classically called an organ when it is made up of more than one tissue with a similar function.

I'm so proud of my big fat organ - it's about 90% of my body mass.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 20, 2018, 11:01:27 AM
There are a few technical mistakes in this paper I'm translating, such as a sentence in the Introduction saying that adipose (fatty) tissue is an organ -- which it is not.
Quote
Fat 'is an organ' say scientists
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/923153.stm

(Thought I had heard that idea before.)

Fat is an organ but it is made up multiple fatty tissues, much like skin is also an organ and is made up of several different tissues.

I had misread what the author had written, but it is in fact correct. What initially confused me (perhaps because of my training) is why the author called it 'tecido adiposo' (adipose tissue in the singular) and not 'tecidos adiposos' (adipose tissues')?  It's a technical issue, and I am just nit-picking since an organ is classically called an organ when it is made up of more than one tissue with a similar function.

I'm so proud of my big fat organ - it's about 90% of my body mass.

Sounds like you might be severely dehydrated, Hermes! :o
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on March 20, 2018, 11:15:54 AM
There are a few technical mistakes in this paper I'm translating, such as a sentence in the Introduction saying that adipose (fatty) tissue is an organ -- which it is not.
Quote
Fat 'is an organ' say scientists
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/923153.stm

(Thought I had heard that idea before.)

Fat is an organ but it is made up multiple fatty tissues, much like skin is also an organ and is made up of several different tissues.

I had misread what the author had written, but it is in fact correct. What initially confused me (perhaps because of my training) is why the author called it 'tecido adiposo' (adipose tissue in the singular) and not 'tecidos adiposos' (adipose tissues')?  It's a technical issue, and I am just nit-picking since an organ is classically called an organ when it is made up of more than one tissue with a similar function.

I'm so proud of my big fat organ - it's about 90% of my body mass.

Sounds like you might be severely dehydrated, Hermes! :o

No, I am not really fat. Just showing off!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 22, 2018, 01:32:07 AM
(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/29496166_1759158367476778_2916503868418131666_n.jpg?_nc_eui2=v1%3AAeEJSeHNsj1SrqbXs2VpF4mWS3z7_oLJHN0OuABWhFfZq1lDi1qghU1vUXOj11NWerTWcZ0JqlnssMxxyNyEoIAJYNKe1pJZFJ5DjSB_NNOpDA&oh=e7e5f8fec770ec942e06af7d7c86c1b2&oe=5B46E649)

(http://rs731.pbsrc.com/albums/ww316/mugwump_photos/smileys/wallbash.gif?w=280&h=210&fit=crop)
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 23, 2018, 03:29:27 AM
Finally finished!  :whew: Man, that was stressful!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on March 23, 2018, 07:05:43 AM
Well done.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on March 23, 2018, 07:57:44 AM
Well done.

 :this:

 :bravo:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on March 23, 2018, 08:53:04 AM
 :brava:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Davin on March 23, 2018, 01:42:56 PM
(https://media1.tenor.com/images/6ca4411fab40740fb1ba5361488c03b0/tenor.gif?itemid=10746739)
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on March 23, 2018, 03:00:12 PM
Finally finished!  :whew: Man, that was stressful!

Splendid. Now let the nit-picking begin.  :lol:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 24, 2018, 03:47:26 PM
Splendid. Now let the nit-picking begin.  :lol:

No hablo español, pero ...

(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/29541638_1761157600610188_2790991860939029280_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&_nc_eui2=v1%3AAeGemQ-Id1uKeHPseOjBKttVSpRS_FFz19ul-uhK48vS79T8b6S5zfFpj0OSFdyh0P7YbC51ME5MPEBS1Sga-EpstBjvdO3L9BPgIn8ZeuKWBg&oh=9e4eebb3da6ec23fb8f836bef3e42980&oe=5B757A21)

Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bad Penny II on March 24, 2018, 04:02:57 PM
Does anyone else find it funny that OldGit is now listed as the creator of this thread?

Git being MASTER of language
Wears an ermine robe on DAYs
Ye a bit funny now you mention
Still grumpy over losing Grumpy
Steve Reason's still got his.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 24, 2018, 06:08:07 PM
Does anyone else find it funny that OldGit is now listed as the creator of this thread?

Git being MASTER of language
Wears an ermine robe on DAYs
Ye a bit funny now you mention
Still grumpy over losing Grumpy
Steve Reason's still got his.

:therethere:

Just in case you need to express your grumpiness in Danish:

(https://scontent.fpoa13-1.fna.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/29542065_1762676790458269_8633682956879386379_n.jpg?_nc_cat=0&_nc_eui2=v1%3AAeGhHHY7VflVyRXMPeUtu7If2E5E1cUytoCL_IsIKiKC7NS93DT7-vJgnLt-kUE9qqkMpjxrX1VO0UzZDUOSzbMxu0TWKJ14oiy0DmR05AG00Q&oh=516275cee17554faa364792ec0387367&oe=5B44977C)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on March 24, 2018, 06:14:15 PM
I like for pokker!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 24, 2018, 06:31:47 PM
I like the term for MORTALLY OFFENDED. I won't ever say it three times fast, though.  :unsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Icarus on March 24, 2018, 11:13:38 PM
I'm amused by the sugar sandwich one.  I'll never remember how to say the danish part.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 25, 2018, 01:35:49 PM
I'm amused by the sugar sandwich one.  I'll never remember how to say the danish part.

Yeah that's an interesting expression. :lol:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on July 08, 2018, 02:28:58 PM
Pleez halp!

What would be a good way to say someone achieved a good outcome despite prognosis? :notsure:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on July 08, 2018, 03:55:20 PM
Pleez halp!

What would be a good way to say someone achieved a good outcome despite prognosis? :notsure:

I take it that the prognosis was not good?

Are you looking for a whole sentence, a short phrase or a single word? 

"The (original) prognosis did not indicate (the possibility of) such a felicitous/fortunate/positive outcome."   ?

Context needed agsin. And you could cast aspertions on those who made the prognosis if not carefull.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on July 08, 2018, 05:40:49 PM
Despite the poor original prognosis the patient made a good (satisfactory)  recovery.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on July 08, 2018, 08:45:07 PM
It's for a medical report for someone who suffered cerebral hypoxia in their infancy and their recovery apparently exceeded expectations.

Despite the poor original prognosis the patient made a good (satisfactory)  recovery.
   

That's good, thanks Tank!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 20, 2018, 06:40:39 PM
What do you call that inflatable toy which comes back after you punch it? This, specifically:

(https://images-americanas.b2w.io/produtos/01/00/item/11901/7/11901713_2SZ.jpg)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on September 20, 2018, 06:45:51 PM
I would call it an inflatable punching bag.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 20, 2018, 07:44:38 PM
Seems to be domething unique to over your wsy, tried searching for it only found what seemed to be Portuguese language sites! Even tried looking for the similar function, but not inflated, budgie toy - they had a type name - but nothing on first 15 pages of Amazon.

Do you have a name for them there that translates, Silvet?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 20, 2018, 09:45:20 PM
Seems to be domething unique to over your wsy, tried searching for it only found what seemed to be Portuguese language sites! Even tried looking for the similar function, but not inflated, budgie toy - they had a type name - but nothing on first 15 pages of Amazon.

Do you have a name for them there that translates, Silvet?

Hmm...that's interesting.  :chin:

Around here they're called 'João bobo'. 'João' is 'John' and 'bobo' translates to something like 'silly', 'fool', or even 'jester' depending on the context. 
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 20, 2018, 09:45:58 PM
I would call it an inflatable punching bag.

But it's more of a punching balloon, isn't it? :P
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 20, 2018, 10:26:19 PM
Nope, did a generic search on 'budgie toys' on Google and selected Images. Nothing like it, they are out of fashion.

But I can remember the one my mother's budgie had, it was a clown with a bell for a hat. When 'Dabs' got annoyed through being ignored he used to swear at it and knock seven shades of, er, sugar (my mother's favourite euphemism) out if it!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on September 21, 2018, 05:00:25 AM
I would call it an inflatable punching bag.

But it's more of a punching balloon, isn't it? :P

Yes, but I was thinking that the hanging thing used by boxers is called a bag. As a matter of interest, why do you need the name?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bluenose on September 21, 2018, 12:21:47 PM
Plenty of hits over here for inflatable punching bag.  There are also a lot of what look like proprietary names, but inflatable punching bag seems to be the generic name.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 21, 2018, 04:08:46 PM
I would call it an inflatable punching bag.

But it's more of a punching balloon, isn't it? :P

Yes, but I was thinking that the hanging thing used by boxers is called a bag. As a matter of interest, why do you need the name?

Just out of curiosity, someone asked me what it was called in English and I had no idea.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 21, 2018, 04:10:41 PM
Plenty of hits over here for inflatable punching bag.  There are also a lot of what look like proprietary names, but inflatable punching bag seems to be the generic name.

Indeed it does!  :thumbsup: Though it may be necessary to qualify it as a kid's inflatable punching bag.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 21, 2018, 05:04:43 PM
I would call it an inflatable punching bag.

But it's more of a punching balloon, isn't it? :P

Yes, but I was thinking that the hanging thing used by boxers is called a bag. As a matter of interest, why do you need the name?

Just out of curiosity, someone asked me what it was called in English and I had no idea.

Well, we have learned that you are curious, Silver. And you evidently have acquaitances of the same nature.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 25, 2018, 09:08:13 PM
I would call it an inflatable punching bag.

But it's more of a punching balloon, isn't it? :P

Yes, but I was thinking that the hanging thing used by boxers is called a bag. As a matter of interest, why do you need the name?

Just out of curiosity, someone asked me what it was called in English and I had no idea.

Well, we have learned that you are curious, Silver. And you evidently have acquaitances of the same nature.

Yes. :P In my case sometimes too curious for my own good.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Sandra Craft on September 25, 2018, 11:56:23 PM
What do you call that inflatable toy which comes back after you punch it?

I seem to remember it being called a "topsy-turvy", but the last time I saw one was over 50 years ago, so . . .
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 26, 2018, 12:41:57 AM
I like "topsy-turvy"! :grin:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bluenose on September 26, 2018, 03:12:02 AM
What do you call that inflatable toy which comes back after you punch it?

I seem to remember it being called a "topsy-turvy", but the last time I saw one was over 50 years ago, so . . .

I remember that name being used for these things!  I wonder if that was the brand name for a particular one...
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on September 26, 2018, 10:50:46 AM
It's a 'children's punch bag'.

And don't listen to Bluenose he doesn't speak English but a dialect known as 'stralian.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bluenose on September 26, 2018, 10:56:48 AM
It's a 'children's punch bag'.

And don't listen to Bluenose he doesn't speak English but a dialect known as 'stralian.

Nah, mate, ya silly galah, it's called Strine...
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 26, 2018, 11:01:03 AM
:lol:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on September 26, 2018, 12:06:42 PM
It's a 'children's punch bag'.

And don't listen to Bluenose he doesn't speak English but a dialect known as 'stralian.

Nah, mate, ya silly galah, it's called Strine...

See what I mean xSPx :D
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bluenose on September 26, 2018, 02:28:10 PM
It's a 'children's punch bag'.

And don't listen to Bluenose he doesn't speak English but a dialect known as 'stralian.

Nah, mate, ya silly galah, it's called Strine...

See what I mean xSPx :D


Only one thing a dinkum Aussie can say to a Pommie in a situation like this: "may ya chooks turn to emus and kick ya dunny down!"
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Dave on September 26, 2018, 02:35:09 PM
It's a 'children's punch bag'.

And don't listen to Bluenose he doesn't speak English but a dialect known as 'stralian.

Nah, mate, ya silly galah, it's called Strine...

See what I mean xSPx :D


Only one thing a dinkum Aussie can say to a Pommie in a situation like this: "may ya chooks turn to emus and kick ya dunny down!"

May I attempt a translation?

"May your chickens turn into emus and kick your outside privvy down."

Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bluenose on September 26, 2018, 02:39:54 PM
It's a 'children's punch bag'.

And don't listen to Bluenose he doesn't speak English but a dialect known as 'stralian.

Nah, mate, ya silly galah, it's called Strine...

See what I mean xSPx :D


Only one thing a dinkum Aussie can say to a Pommie in a situation like this: "may ya chooks turn to emus and kick ya dunny down!"

May I attempt a translation?

"May your chickens turn into emus and kick your outside privvy down."

Yeah mate, that's wot I sed.  You fick or sumpin?
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 26, 2018, 02:49:46 PM
Oh, now look what you've gone and done, Tank. Bluenose has become non-intelligible!  :-\

 ;D
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bluenose on September 27, 2018, 02:16:45 AM
Oh, now look what you've gone and done, Tank. Bluenose has become non-intelligible!  :-\

 ;D

Eh?  Ize compleely tellibidgel!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 29, 2018, 01:10:20 AM
Oh, now look what you've gone and done, Tank. Bluenose has become non-intelligible!  :-\

 ;D

Eh?  Ize compleely tellibidgel!

:no idea:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on September 30, 2018, 04:36:46 AM
What do you call that inflatable toy which comes back after you punch it?

In the US, they're called bop bags (http://www.superdairyboy.com/3-D_Bob_Bags.html). Much less inventive and evocative than the Brazilian name.  :)
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on September 30, 2018, 03:43:10 PM
What do you call that inflatable toy which comes back after you punch it?

In the US, they're called bop bags (http://www.superdairyboy.com/3-D_Bob_Bags.html). Much less inventive and evocative than the Brazilian name.  :)

Cool. Thanks Recusant!  ;D
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 18, 2018, 02:20:38 PM
I need help with wording. :)

Does 'patients with diagnoses bordering on malignancy' make sense? The idea is patients diagnosed with cancer stages which are advanced but which have not yet undergone metastases. 
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bluenose on November 18, 2018, 03:15:24 PM
I need help with wording. :)

Does 'patients with diagnoses bordering on malignancy' make sense? The idea is patients diagnosed with cancer stages which are advanced but which have not yet undergone metastases.


l think I'd word it "patients with malignant cancer that has not yet metastasised"
or "patients with non-metastastic malingnant cancer"
or indeed "patients with non-metastastic malingnancy"
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on November 18, 2018, 04:02:16 PM
I was thinking "pre-metastatic" but I looked at terminology and usage, and it appears that nonmetastatic (https://www.cancer.gov/publications/dictionaries/cancer-terms/def/nonmetastatic), as suggested by Bluenose is the appropriate term.  :)
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 18, 2018, 06:56:31 PM
Thanks guys! ;D
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 28, 2018, 11:43:07 PM
Quick question: when talking about a survey, is it better to say "best and worst scores" or "highest and lowest scores"? :notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on November 29, 2018, 12:15:50 AM
Snipped the beginning of some long-winded blather about relative meaning of "response" and "score." :)

"Highest and lowest" doesn't imply a value judgement in the way that "best and worst" does. It's purely a description of the survey result. If your intention is to convey a matter of fact rather than your evaluation of that fact, I'd say it's better to avoid even implying a value judgement.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on November 29, 2018, 12:44:19 AM
Snipped the beginning of some long-winded blather about relative meaning of "response" and "score." :)

"Highest and lowest" doesn't imply a value judgement in the way that "best and worst" does. It's purely a description of the survey result. If your intention is to convey a matter of fact rather than your evaluation of that fact, I'd say it's better to avoid even implying a value judgement.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking, in the case of this survey, the results are numbers and statistical outcomes, so I imagine "highest and lowest" are the better terms. :)

Thanks, Recusant!  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 10, 2018, 12:04:48 AM
Does it make sense to say a certain factor promotes the onset of a disease? What word would it be better to use instead? :notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jumbojak on December 10, 2018, 12:27:59 AM
Perhaps precedes?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bluenose on December 10, 2018, 12:43:07 AM
Promotes implies some sort of causative effect, whereas precedes merely means that it happens before.  So it depends on what you are trying to convey.
Maybe you are looking for exacerbates, which basically means that although the factor may or may not be causative, it makes the condition worse.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 10, 2018, 12:54:41 AM
Sorry, should have added more context. I forget there's no such thing as mind-reading. ;D (As of yet. :worried:)

I'm looking for a word that implies a causative effect, such as in the case of the accumulation of a certain protein in a person which may lead to the development of a chronic condition. The onset of the disease was due to the protein.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jumbojak on December 10, 2018, 02:17:57 AM
Why not just say that it caused the disease then?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 10, 2018, 02:29:57 AM
Why not just say that it caused the disease then?

That's what I ended up putting.  ;D

I don't know why I like to complicate things.  ::)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on December 10, 2018, 02:55:04 AM
Induce?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 10, 2018, 02:58:35 AM
Induce?

:chin: I like 'induce'.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 13, 2018, 11:27:59 PM
I have another question. :grin:

What would be a good word for devastating cancer? My aunt asked me to help with an abstract, and in it, they wrote 'violent cancer', but it's a literal translation and just doesn't seem right in English. Does 'severe cancer' work? :notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Sandra Craft on December 13, 2018, 11:57:11 PM
I think "severe" would work, also "traumatic" and for that matter "devastating".  Altho I suppose it depends on whether you're describing the cancer's physical or emotional effects.  Rapid and progressive could work for a more physical description.  I know there's a better word, but I just can't remember it.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 14, 2018, 12:11:40 AM
I think "severe" would work, also "traumatic" and for that matter "devastating".  Altho I suppose it depends on whether you're describing the cancer's physical or emotional effects.  Rapid and progressive could work for a more physical description.  I know there's a better word, but I just can't remember it.

They're describing physical effects. 'Rapid and progressive' captures the meaning but there is a word limit so maybe it could be called 'aggressive cancer' instead? Or 'fast-growing cancer'? :notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Sandra Craft on December 14, 2018, 02:14:07 AM
I think "severe" would work, also "traumatic" and for that matter "devastating".  Altho I suppose it depends on whether you're describing the cancer's physical or emotional effects.  Rapid and progressive could work for a more physical description.  I know there's a better word, but I just can't remember it.

They're describing physical effects. 'Rapid and progressive' captures the meaning but there is a word limit so maybe it could be called 'aggressive cancer' instead? Or 'fast-growing cancer'? :notsure:

"Aggressive" sounds right.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 14, 2018, 02:29:56 AM
I think "severe" would work, also "traumatic" and for that matter "devastating".  Altho I suppose it depends on whether you're describing the cancer's physical or emotional effects.  Rapid and progressive could work for a more physical description.  I know there's a better word, but I just can't remember it.

They're describing physical effects. 'Rapid and progressive' captures the meaning but there is a word limit so maybe it could be called 'aggressive cancer' instead? Or 'fast-growing cancer'? :notsure:

"Aggressive" sounds right.

Excellent!  ;D Thank you.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on December 14, 2018, 08:01:22 AM
'aggressive' is used to describe cancer that is difficult to cure and is growing in the  patient.

Note to self. Finish reading thread before commenting.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Ecurb Noselrub on December 14, 2018, 04:48:42 PM
'aggressive' is used to describe cancer that is difficult to cure and is growing in the  patient.

Note to self. Finish reading thread before commenting.

What is a good word for an administrator who changes his user name every couple of days?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jumbojak on December 14, 2018, 09:51:30 PM
'aggressive' is used to describe cancer that is difficult to cure and is growing in the  patient.

Note to self. Finish reading thread before commenting.

What is a good word for an administrator who changes his user name every couple of days?

The Boss.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 18, 2018, 10:54:19 PM
'aggressive' is used to describe cancer that is difficult to cure and is growing in the  patient.

Note to self. Finish reading thread before commenting.

 :P
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 18, 2018, 10:58:51 PM
'aggressive' is used to describe cancer that is difficult to cure and is growing in the  patient.

Note to self. Finish reading thread before commenting.

What is a good word for an administrator who changes his user name every couple of days?

The Boss.

(https://rlv.zcache.com/tank_boss_man-r9074a69803fd48848cf6d09ba97bcc88_65ye0_307.jpg?rvtype=content)

 :P
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on December 19, 2018, 10:42:08 AM
'aggressive' is used to describe cancer that is difficult to cure and is growing in the  patient.

Note to self. Finish reading thread before commenting.

What is a good word for an administrator who changes his user name every couple of days?

Bored.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on December 19, 2018, 10:43:43 AM
'aggressive' is used to describe cancer that is difficult to cure and is growing in the  patient.

Note to self. Finish reading thread before commenting.

What is a good word for an administrator who changes his user name every couple of days?

Bored.

There you go, back to 'Tank' :grin:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 19, 2018, 10:06:51 PM
Cancer staging determines disease progression and prognostics. Stages range from 0 to 4, with the latter being end-stage cancer. What would be a good way to say the cancer got worse in terms of stage progression? As in, went from stage 3 to 4, for instance.

:notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jumbojak on December 19, 2018, 10:38:40 PM
The first word that comes to mind is "deteriorated" but that's not quite what I think you're looking to say.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 20, 2018, 12:00:32 AM
The first word that comes to mind is "deteriorated" but that's not quite what I think you're looking to say.

Can a stage deteriorate? I'm not sure...
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jumbojak on December 20, 2018, 12:47:15 AM
Cancer no, but health could depending on how you word it. I don't think it's quite the word you're looking for but I do think it's in the ballpark.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 20, 2018, 12:52:41 AM
Cancer no, but health could depending on how you word it. I don't think it's quite the word you're looking for but I do think it's in the ballpark.

OK.  :bigspecs:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jimbob on December 20, 2018, 04:11:33 AM
Silver,

I lost my wife to cancer, and if the devil did exist, it's name would be Cancer.

i attempt to conceal my emotions, but my wishes for your recovery are the strongest I could possible feel toward you.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on December 20, 2018, 05:13:20 AM
Cancer staging determines disease progression and prognostics. Stages range from 0 to 4, with the latter being end-stage cancer. What would be a good way to say the cancer got worse in terms of stage progression? As in, went from stage 3 to 4, for instance.

:notsure:

I think the most common way of phrasing it is to say that the cancer "advanced" from stage I to stage II.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on December 20, 2018, 07:44:35 AM
Silver,

I lost my wife to cancer, and if the devil did exist, it's name would be Cancer.

i attempt to conceal my emotions, but my wishes for your recovery are the strongest I could possible feel toward you.

This made me panic! xSPx does translation as a side line. She's fine!
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 20, 2018, 11:04:19 AM
Silver,

I lost my wife to cancer, and if the devil did exist, it's name would be Cancer.

i attempt to conceal my emotions, but my wishes for your recovery are the strongest I could possible feel toward you.

I'm very sorry to hear that, jimbob. :( I truly am.

As far as I know, I'm not afflicted with this terrible disease. I posted the question in this thread to ask for help regarding proper word usage since I'm translating a scientific review article on cancer into English. 
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 20, 2018, 11:06:07 AM
Cancer staging determines disease progression and prognostics. Stages range from 0 to 4, with the latter being end-stage cancer. What would be a good way to say the cancer got worse in terms of stage progression? As in, went from stage 3 to 4, for instance.

:notsure:

I think the most common way of phrasing it is to say that the cancer "advanced" from stage I to stage II.

Seems so obvious now.  :thumbsup:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bad Penny II on December 20, 2018, 01:26:09 PM
Cancer staging determines disease progression....
What would be a good way to say the cancer got worse in terms of stage progression

It's progressed?
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 20, 2018, 01:36:23 PM
Cancer staging determines disease progression....
What would be a good way to say the cancer got worse in terms of stage progression

It's progressed?

Perhaps, but I don't like 'progressed'. :P
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bad Penny II on December 20, 2018, 01:43:13 PM
Should of said you were after a euphemism for progressed then. :P
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on December 20, 2018, 02:06:22 PM
Should of said you were after a euphemism for progressed then. :P

I'll keep that in mind for next time. ;)
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: jimbob on December 20, 2018, 03:32:40 PM
"As far as I know, I'm not afflicted with this terrible disease. I posted the question in this thread to ask for help regarding proper word usage since I'm translating a scientific review article on cancer into English.  "

so sorry to have misunderstood. i'm new here, and only read the most current posts, unless I find it useful to go back further to catch up on the topic.

at any rate, I am delighted to know of your good health.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 30, 2019, 05:31:58 PM
Is there a word for a person who consumes alcohol but is not necessarily an alcoholic? :notsure:

ETA: would 'ethylist' work? It doesn't seem to be too common to me...

ETA(again): or just 'drinker'? Sounds a bit too colloquial, though.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on March 30, 2019, 06:10:05 PM
I think a good description would be problem drinker.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 30, 2019, 06:27:24 PM
I think a good description would be problem drinker.

Ok ;D
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on March 30, 2019, 09:07:50 PM
A habitual drinker?  :notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 30, 2019, 09:20:54 PM
A habitual drinker?  :notsure:

Yeah, that crossed my mind, but I need a word that includes alcoholics as well as the habitual drinkers. :grin:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Magdalena on March 30, 2019, 09:45:20 PM
A habitual drinker?  :notsure:

Yeah, that crossed my mind, but I need a word that includes alcoholics as well as the habitual drinkers. :grin:
Put both in one word!?
I don't think you can even put them in the same room! They don't even like each other!
 :grin:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 30, 2019, 09:49:20 PM
A habitual drinker?  :notsure:

Yeah, that crossed my mind, but I need a word that includes alcoholics as well as the habitual drinkers. :grin:
Put both in one word!?
I don't think you can even put them in the same room! They don't even like each other!
 :grin:

:lol: :grin:
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on March 31, 2019, 07:04:13 AM
Is there a word for a person who consumes alcohol but is not necessarily an alcoholic? :notsure:

ETA: would 'ethylist' work? It doesn't seem to be too common to me...

ETA(again): or just 'drinker'? Sounds a bit too colloquial, though.

Since you apparently to want to avoid colloquialisms, I suppose you're looking for a clinical term (though "drinker" is just standard English, not really a colloquialism). I don't think there is a single word that will suffice in that sort of context. "Alcohol user" may be the most appropriate, but if you need to throw the widest net and specifically include those who suffer from alcoholism, "alcohol users and abusers" might be better. I think that all of the single word equivalents of "drinker" are more colloquial, not less.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Unsapien on March 31, 2019, 11:08:51 AM
Imbiber?

Though technically I think "imbibe" refers to any type of liquid that is consumed on a regular basis, like... he likes to imbibe tea, or coffee, etc.

But left on it's own, "he imbibes" or "he likes to imbibe" would lead most people to assume that we're talking about alcohol.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 31, 2019, 05:58:41 PM
Is there a word for a person who consumes alcohol but is not necessarily an alcoholic? :notsure:

ETA: would 'ethylist' work? It doesn't seem to be too common to me...

ETA(again): or just 'drinker'? Sounds a bit too colloquial, though.

Since you apparently to want to avoid colloquialisms, I suppose you're looking for a clinical term (though "drinker" is just standard English, not really a colloquialism). I don't think there is a single word that will suffice in that sort of context. "Alcohol user" may be the most appropriate, but if you need to throw the widest net and specifically include those who suffer from alcoholism, "alcohol users and abusers" might be better. I think that all of the single word equivalents of "drinker" are more colloquial, not less.

:chin: Interesting. Merci beaucoup!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 31, 2019, 05:59:08 PM
Imbiber?

Though technically I think "imbibe" refers to any type of liquid that is consumed on a regular basis, like... he likes to imbibe tea, or coffee, etc.

But left on it's own, "he imbibes" or "he likes to imbibe" would lead most people to assume that we're talking about alcohol.

Never heard that one before! Is it common?
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 21, 2019, 02:11:32 PM
Ok, so my mother wanted me to translate this insurance policy...thing for a student of hers who works in a travel agency and I said no because I am not familiar with insurance terms and don't feel bothered enough to sift through online templates to dig up the terms I need for little pay.

OK, so along comes my impulsive sister (the one with a drug problem) and says she'll do it, and my mother gives it to her in hopes that she'll get off her lazy ass and actually do something productive. :picard facepalm: It's worth mentioning that all the drugs my sister has taken for the past 15 years has left her with cognitive sequela.

Long story short, my sister translated it into English and sent it to me so that I could format the Word document before sending it back to the client. It's due tomorrow.

I scan the translated document quickly with my eyes and see all sorts of problems. For instance, my sister used the word "escorts" instead of the probably more suitable "accompanying persons" or something like that. As far as I know, escorts are people who work in dating services.  :d'oh!:

Another, what the hell do you call the travel insurance thing with the coverages? She translated it as "travel insurance ticket", a very literal translation from Portuguese, but when I look it up online all I find are insurance policies covering ticket sales.

Thanks mom, there goes my Sunday. ::)
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bad Penny II on April 21, 2019, 03:33:38 PM
Ok, so my mother wanted me to translate this insurance policy...thing for a student of hers who works in a travel agency and I said no because I am not familiar with insurance terms and don't feel bothered enough to sift through online templates to dig up the terms I need for little pay.

OK, so along comes my impulsive sister (the one with a drug problem) and says she'll do it, and my mother gives it to her in hopes that she'll get off her lazy ass and actually do something productive. :picard facepalm: It's worth mentioning that all the drugs my sister has taken for the past 15 years has left her with cognitive sequela.

Long story short, my sister translated it into English and sent it to me so that I could format the Word document before sending it back to the client. It's due tomorrow.

I scan the translated document quickly with my eyes and see all sorts of problems. For instance, my sister used the word "escorts" instead of the probably more suitable "accompanying persons" or something like that. As far as I know, escorts are people who work in dating services.  :d'oh!:

Another, what the hell do you call the travel insurance thing with the coverages? She translated it as "travel insurance ticket", a very literal translation from Portuguese, but when I look it up online all I find are insurance policies covering ticket sales.

Thanks mom, there goes my Sunday. ::)

Escort: The act of accompanying someone or something in order to protect them.
It could be just to guide, anyway I don't think the word is the property of prostitutes.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 21, 2019, 03:48:59 PM
Ok, so my mother wanted me to translate this insurance policy...thing for a student of hers who works in a travel agency and I said no because I am not familiar with insurance terms and don't feel bothered enough to sift through online templates to dig up the terms I need for little pay.

OK, so along comes my impulsive sister (the one with a drug problem) and says she'll do it, and my mother gives it to her in hopes that she'll get off her lazy ass and actually do something productive. :picard facepalm: It's worth mentioning that all the drugs my sister has taken for the past 15 years has left her with cognitive sequela.

Long story short, my sister translated it into English and sent it to me so that I could format the Word document before sending it back to the client. It's due tomorrow.

I scan the translated document quickly with my eyes and see all sorts of problems. For instance, my sister used the word "escorts" instead of the probably more suitable "accompanying persons" or something like that. As far as I know, escorts are people who work in dating services.  :d'oh!:

Another, what the hell do you call the travel insurance thing with the coverages? She translated it as "travel insurance ticket", a very literal translation from Portuguese, but when I look it up online all I find are insurance policies covering ticket sales.

Thanks mom, there goes my Sunday. ::)

Escort: The act of accompanying someone or something in order to protect them.
It could be just to guide, anyway I don't think the word is the property of prostitutes.

Yeah, I checked the original, and in that it clearly means people accompanying the insured, such as friends and/relatives. The insurance, in this case, covers the repatriation of such people in the event of an accident or injury. 

I guess a prostitute could be counted as a friend or family, but ...
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 21, 2019, 04:32:40 PM
I found "insurance cover note". Seems to be the applicable term for the coverage summary document...

:notsure:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on April 21, 2019, 04:53:37 PM
That's a drag, and your annoyance is justified, but is the willingness to be a productive member of the family (even if an ineffective one whose work needs correcting) a positive development in the case of your sister?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 21, 2019, 05:09:49 PM
That's a drag, and your annoyance is justified, but is the willingness to be a productive member of the family (even if an ineffective one whose work needs correcting) a positive development in the case of your sister?

I don't really know. She's both impulsive (takes more work than she can handle) and irresponsible (doesn't care if she does a lousy job). Thing is, she doesn't want money to settle her many debts or pay for her own sustenance, she wants money to get her hair done and since nobody will pay for that she took this job. So I don't really know if it's a positive development of just a teenager trapped in the body of a 30-year-old woman who throws her tantrums when people don't pay for things and then tries to get money with minimal effort.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on April 21, 2019, 05:29:11 PM
OK, that makes sense. Thank you for being patient with my ignorant comment.  :)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 21, 2019, 05:32:02 PM
OK, that makes sense. Thank you for being patient with my ignorant comment.  :)

Hey, no worries! It helps to rant, heheh.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Bad Penny II on April 22, 2019, 09:17:25 AM
I found "insurance cover note". Seems to be the applicable term for the coverage summary document...

:notsure:

Really?
cover note: "a temporary document provided by an insurance company as proof that you are insured, until the final official document is available:

They are temporary, is this what you're after?
If you buy a car you phone your insurance company and they give you temporary cover until an insurance policy is produced.
Title: Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 23, 2019, 08:43:31 PM
I found "insurance cover note". Seems to be the applicable term for the coverage summary document...

:notsure:

Really?
cover note: "a temporary document provided by an insurance company as proof that you are insured, until the final official document is available:

They are temporary, is this what you're after?
If you buy a car you phone your insurance company and they give you temporary cover until an insurance policy is produced.

Good point, I'll have to look into it further. :notsure:

Argh, we really need an emoji banging its head against the wall!
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Davin on April 23, 2019, 09:59:38 PM
Argh, we really need an emoji banging its head against the wall!

(https://i.imgur.com/VCV4by4.gif)
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 23, 2019, 10:02:20 PM
Argh, we really need an emoji banging its head against the wall!

(https://i.imgur.com/VCV4by4.gif)

Excellent!  :thumbsup: Gracias!

Recusant, can we add this to the emoji zoo?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Recusant on April 24, 2019, 06:45:52 AM
Seems too mild for the idea of banging a head against the wall. How about this one?

(https://i.imgur.com/8p5VEIQ.gif)

I have nothing against adding them both, for that matter.  :grin:
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: Tank on April 24, 2019, 07:54:14 AM
(https://i.imgur.com/VCV4by4.gif) normal theists.

(https://i.imgur.com/8p5VEIQ.gif) creationists.
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: hermes2015 on April 24, 2019, 09:07:29 AM
(https://i.imgur.com/VCV4by4.gif) normal theists.

Oxymoron?
Title: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
Post by: xSilverPhinx on April 25, 2019, 01:40:59 PM
Seems too mild for the idea of banging a head against the wall. How about this one?

(https://i.imgur.com/8p5VEIQ.gif)

I have nothing against adding them both, for that matter.  :grin:

Wow, that one's really trying to cause multiple skull fractures, isn't it? I like it! :grin:

:notsure: I have nothing against them both being in the emoji zoo either. There is a nuanced difference between them.  :snicker: