Author Topic: Not science as such but . . .  (Read 642 times)

Dave

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Not science as such but . . .
« on: March 04, 2017, 03:20:59 AM »
Just in case you need to convert something in a sciencey article to something you might understand the Engineering Toolbox has useful tables and formulae.

Use this thread for anything you might think a useful adjunct to understanding science.
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hermes2015

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2017, 03:54:08 AM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2017, 05:07:24 AM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

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hermes2015

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2017, 05:59:06 AM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

You can think of electronegativity as a measure of how much an atom loves electrons, in other words, how strongly it attracts electrons. This can induce a dipole in a molecule that causes it to be polar, and this has a great effect on the properties of the molecule.

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2017, 07:08:22 AM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

You can think of electronegativity as a measure of how much an atom loves electrons, in other words, how strongly it attracts electrons. This can induce a dipole in a molecule that causes it to be polar, and this has a great effect on the properties of the molecule.
Read the Wiki entry - well, as far as the maths anyway! I presume that is a charge dipole rather than a magnetic one?
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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2017, 07:12:05 AM »
Excellent link Gloucester.
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hermes2015

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2017, 07:18:29 AM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

You can think of electronegativity as a measure of how much an atom loves electrons, in other words, how strongly it attracts electrons. This can induce a dipole in a molecule that causes it to be polar, and this has a great effect on the properties of the molecule.
Read the Wiki entry - well, as far as the maths anyway! I presume that is a charge dipole rather than a magnetic one?

You've got it. The electrons spend more time at one end of the molecule, causing a charge dipole.

joeactor

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2017, 07:49:07 AM »
Cool...

If you have a WordPress site, there's a nifty converter plug-in called "Oppso":
https://tah.wordpress.org/plugins-wp/oppso-unit-converter/

You can even configure it to convert anything you'd like - I used it for Rubber Chickens (scroll down):
http://www.joesdump.com/2014/04/28/chicken-measuring/

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2017, 08:45:18 AM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

You can think of electronegativity as a measure of how much an atom loves electrons, in other words, how strongly it attracts electrons. This can induce a dipole in a molecule that causes it to be polar, and this has a great effect on the properties of the molecule.
Read the Wiki entry - well, as far as the maths anyway! I presume that is a charge dipole rather than a magnetic one?

You've got it. The electrons spend more time at one end of the molecule, causing a charge dipole.

Can it be used for any analytical purposes?  Bit like NMR spectroscopy but different?
« Last Edit: March 04, 2017, 09:24:03 AM by Gloucester »
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hermes2015

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2017, 09:52:56 AM »
Yes, one analytical technique where we use different polarities is high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Separation of a mixture into its components can be achieved by fine tuning the polarities of eluting solvents and changing them over time as a gradient.

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2017, 10:08:31 AM »
Yes, one analytical technique where we use different polarities is high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Separation of a mixture into its components can be achieved by fine tuning the polarities of eluting solvents and changing them over time as a gradient.

Ah, interesting. Need to look more at HPLC but got the idea - guessing it "smears" the various compounds into a sequence. Need to know wgat's in that shiny tube shown in the Wiki article.

Enough for the monent though, thanks Hermes.

Ah, found http://www.waters.com/waters/en_GB/How-Does-High-Performance-Liquid-Chromatography-Work%3F/nav.htm?cid=10049055&locale=en_GB
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