Happy Atheist Forum

General => Media => Topic started by: Arturo on March 15, 2017, 04:02:09 PM

Title: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Arturo on March 15, 2017, 04:02:09 PM
I've been watching a lot of TV, movies, and YouTube for awhile and I think I am burned out. So I decided to read. Here's what I'm reading; what about you?

(http://i.imgur.com/v2e9VAo.jpg)
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 15, 2017, 05:52:09 PM
How We Learn - any good?
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Arturo on March 15, 2017, 06:38:19 PM
How We Learn - any good?

I haven't gotten to that one yet because the swoley Bible is due back at the library sooner than the other two. I will tell you what I make of it though once I get into it.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Davin on March 16, 2017, 09:45:22 AM
The most recent books I read and am going to read.
(http://i.imgur.com/bY7rQa4.png)

I was reading at a fast pace last year to catch up on my book queue, now that I have caught up, I slowed down so that I could spend more time on my game queue.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 16, 2017, 02:59:48 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/bY7rQa4.png)

Wow Davin, I'm truly impressed. I wish I was that systematic.  :P
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Davin on March 17, 2017, 09:04:23 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/bY7rQa4.png)

Wow Davin, I'm truly impressed. I wish I was that systematic.  :P
It's a bit sad I think. It's how I have to function if I want to be efficient and still have enough time to veg out when I need to. Meanwhile, everyone else seems to get by just fine without all that extra work.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on March 17, 2017, 09:48:48 AM
Well, I think it's just a tad sad myself - but I am also impressed.

Also, since you seem to like several of my favourite authors, you have also given me some ideas for future reading.

Currently I'm into Chris Nuttall's Bookworm IV. Nuttall is inventive but tends to repeat too many things too often, I know that thunder is usually "high overhead" and that rain comes from "high overhead", don't need both statements in the same sentence - and several other occurrences of the same phrase elsewhere!

Actually this is a writing error other sci-fi and fantasy ebook writers suffer, I only need to be told, "... HUD (Head Up Display) ..." once, I can remember the next twenty times he looks into his "HUD (Head Up Display)".

Is this because so few ebook writers get their work proofread, let alone edited, by someone who has half an idea how to do those jobs? Have volunteered a couple of times but no takers so far! Thought it might be a way of getting freebie books - I cannot read without prooreading and my fingers itch to edit.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Davin on March 17, 2017, 10:08:06 AM
Yeah, I have lists for almost everything. I like google docs so that I can access them from any device anywhere, also, I like googles note app for the same reasons.

I'll have to check out Nuttall, I haven't read anything by that author.

When the author repeats things too often, it also bugs me. I read Atom my Laurence Krauss, and while I thought it was a great book, I felt like he jumped around between the future, past and present too much. But at least I can understand why he was doing it, he tended to repeat things to clarify things, even though I think it was a bit too much repeating information.

For that HUD thing, I think they were worried a bit much about their audience. For self published authors, they have less control about who their audience might be, so many try to accommodate for the lowest common denominator. On the other hand, there was a book I read a few years ago that made use of several acronyms and only explained them once and even by context it was tough to read through. Though a bit better than reading a Clockwork Orange with all that "slang."

Publishers also tend to pay editors more, so they get "better' editors, for self published authors, editors don't often make too much, so you tend to get editors that may not be as good or just has less experience. That seems to be changing though.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Father Bruno on March 17, 2017, 10:20:46 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/bY7rQa4.png)

Wow Davin, I'm truly impressed. I wish I was that systematic.  :P
It's a bit sad I think. It's how I have to function if I want to be efficient and still have enough time to veg out when I need to. Meanwhile, everyone else seems to get by just fine without all that extra work.

I know exactly what you mean Davin as I have the same or similar systematic hangups as you. I mean I want to be efficient, but also romantic, and sometimes just laze around and sleep afterwards; not feel so compelled to update my spreadsheet all the fucking time. :'(
Spoiler: show
(http://i.imgur.com/mPlD4Dp.png)
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Magdalena on March 17, 2017, 10:49:21 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/bY7rQa4.png)

Wow Davin, I'm truly impressed. I wish I was that systematic.  :P
It's a bit sad I think. It's how I have to function if I want to be efficient and still have enough time to veg out when I need to. Meanwhile, everyone else seems to get by just fine without all that extra work.

I know exactly what you mean Davin as I have the same or similar systematic hangups as you. I mean I want to be efficient, but also romantic, and sometimes just laze around and sleep afterwards; not feel so compelled to update my spreadsheet all the fucking time. :'(
Spoiler: show
(http://i.imgur.com/mPlD4Dp.png)

This is funny.  :lol:
Condenado Padre Bruno!  :smileshake:
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on March 17, 2017, 10:52:50 AM
Yeah, I have lists for almost everything. I like google docs so that I can access them from any device anywhere, also, I like googles note app for the same reasons.

I'll have to check out Nuttall, I haven't read anything by that author.

When the author repeats things too often, it also bugs me. I read Atom my Laurence Krauss, and while I thought it was a great book, I felt like he jumped around between the future, past and present too much. But at least I can understand why he was doing it, he tended to repeat things to clarify things, even though I think it was a bit too much repeating information.

For that HUD thing, I think they were worried a bit much about their audience. For self published authors, they have less control about who their audience might be, so many try to accommodate for the lowest common denominator. On the other hand, there was a book I read a few years ago that made use of several acronyms and only explained them once and even by context it was tough to read through. Though a bit better than reading a Clockwork Orange with all that "slang."

Publishers also tend to pay editors more, so they get "better' editors, for self published authors, editors don't often make too much, so you tend to get editors that may not be as good or just has less experience. That seems to be changing though.

I offered to edit just for the free books! But that is an old retired guy who does not need the money taking potential paying work from someone who does.

Not ethical.

I did think of the reader's "attention span/memory" thing in some of the repeats but HUD pops up so often these days, just about every space marine and future techie has one! The acronym stuff is bad writing IMHO, no matter how good the story; unless they spell a word, especially a funny word, that the reader can latch onto.

Niall Teasdale is another very inventive writer who, for me, spoiled his "Thaumatology" series with blocks of several pages of very graphic  lesbian, s&m and menage a trois adolescent wet-dream sex. Repetitive and boring in the end but always contains things vital to the story. Skip them and get confused later.

I am just an old pedant.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Dragonia on March 17, 2017, 12:15:01 PM
Ha ha, Davin, that is an awesome spreadsheet,  I'm very impressed by your organization. I too have a reading  list, but it's just in my notes and it's kind of a mess.
And Father Bruno, hilarious.... I guess one can't be TOO organized! After all, to know where you want to go, it helps to know where you've been.  :smug:
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 17, 2017, 12:42:27 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/bY7rQa4.png)

Wow Davin, I'm truly impressed. I wish I was that systematic.  :P
It's a bit sad I think. It's how I have to function if I want to be efficient and still have enough time to veg out when I need to. Meanwhile, everyone else seems to get by just fine without all that extra work.

I know exactly what you mean Davin as I have the same or similar systematic hangups as you. I mean I want to be efficient, but also romantic, and sometimes just laze around and sleep afterwards; not feel so compelled to update my spreadsheet all the fucking time. :'(
Spoiler: show
(http://i.imgur.com/mPlD4Dp.png)


I may need a new keyboard. :rofl:
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Davin on March 17, 2017, 01:13:40 PM
(https://media.giphy.com/media/13ZHjidRzoi7n2/giphy.gif)
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Arturo on March 17, 2017, 06:03:59 PM
How We Learn - any good?

It's fucking fascinating. I think I found my calling in life. It's talking about memory first off. And second, you know that girl I go on about sometimes? She has short term memory loss which this book talks about in the first chapter. xSPx you gotta learn me some of that neuroscience right NOW!
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: xSilverPhinx on March 19, 2017, 05:26:11 AM
How We Learn - any good?

It's fucking fascinating. I think I found my calling in life. It's talking about memory first off. And second, you know that girl I go on about sometimes? She has short term memory loss which this book talks about in the first chapter. xSPx you gotta learn me some of that neuroscience right NOW!

:grin: A convert!

Neuroscience is fascinating. Two books I enjoyed very much are Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (https://www.amazon.com.br/Subliminal-Your-Unconscious-Rules-Behavior/dp/0307472256) and Sleights of Mind (http://www.sleightsofmind.com/). They don't have to do with memory per se, but there are plenty of scientific papers and textbooks regarding that topic. :grin:

One book to get started on the topic of memory is the Nobel prize winner Kandel's In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind (https://www.amazon.com.br/Search-Memory-Emergence-Science-Mind/dp/0393329372). I haven't read it myself, but the guy is basically a pioneer in the field and very well respected.

 
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Arturo on March 19, 2017, 09:52:21 AM
How We Learn - any good?

It's fucking fascinating. I think I found my calling in life. It's talking about memory first off. And second, you know that girl I go on about sometimes? She has short term memory loss which this book talks about in the first chapter. xSPx you gotta learn me some of that neuroscience right NOW!

:grin: A convert!

Neuroscience is fascinating. Two books I enjoyed very much are Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior (https://www.amazon.com.br/Subliminal-Your-Unconscious-Rules-Behavior/dp/0307472256) and Sleights of Mind (http://www.sleightsofmind.com/). They don't have to do with memory per se, but there are plenty of scientific papers and textbooks regarding that topic. :grin:

One book to get started on the topic of memory is the Nobel prize winner Kandel's In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind (https://www.amazon.com.br/Search-Memory-Emergence-Science-Mind/dp/0393329372). I haven't read it myself, but the guy is basically a pioneer in the field and very well respected.

Great! I was looking into subconscious mind power when I came across these books. Fucking great shit.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: hermes2015 on March 19, 2017, 10:38:31 AM
For you music lovers, I can recommend Eric Siblin's The Cello Suites. I am halfway through it now and love the way he uses the structure of Bach's cello suites to introduce biographical details of Pablo Casals, and J, S. Bach himself, while describing his own discovery of the cello suites.

I also urge everyone here to give the suites a try - some of my all-time favourite pieces (does this belong here or in the What Are You Listening To thread?)
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: solidsquid on March 20, 2017, 04:16:03 PM
For a class I'm taking this semester.  Text is decent but quite basic, not a lot of detail.  Instructor is very disorganized.  No worries though, I'm switching programs in the fall anyhow.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51CdqT7C9-L._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Arturo on March 20, 2017, 07:55:37 PM
For a class I'm taking this semester.  Text is decent but quite basic, not a lot of detail.  Instructor is very disorganized.  No worries though, I'm switching programs in the fall anyhow.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51CdqT7C9-L._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

What exactly is this for? I read some of the wiki, just says it's techniques for process improvement. I assume it's for engineering?
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on March 21, 2017, 12:10:28 AM
For a class I'm taking this semester.  Text is decent but quite basic, not a lot of detail.  Instructor is very disorganized.  No worries though, I'm switching programs in the fall anyhow.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51CdqT7C9-L._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

What exactly is this for? I read some of the wiki, just says it's techniques for process improvement. I assume it's for engineering?
Quote
Six Sigma (sometimes stylized as 6σ) is a set of techniques and tools for process improvement. It was introduced by engineer Bill Smith while working at Motorola in 1986.[1][2] Jack Welch made it central to his business strategy at General Electric in 1995.[3] Today, it is used in many industrial sectors.[4]

It seeks to improve the quality of the output of a process by identifying and removing the causes of defects and minimizing variability in manufacturing and business processes. It uses a set of quality management methods, mainly empirical, statistical methods, and creates a special infrastructure of people within the organization who are experts in these methods. Each Six Sigma project carried out within an organization follows a defined sequence of steps and has specific value targets, for example: reduce process cycle time, reduce pollution, reduce costs, increase customer satisfaction, and increase profits.

Wiki (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Sigma)

Sounds a bit like when I improved a process and almost eliminated rework by simply adding a cheap rubber O-ring as a spacer and using an exact length of solder (and a pair of tweezers) to attach two components together. They had been making this item for 20 years with a 40% first time failure rate on testing! Then I rewrote the manufacturing instructions and rededigned the test results sheet (simplifying the maths) so that even a non-chemist (like me) could cope with it.

The courses cost about £2500 over here, guessing they concentrate mainly on ways to look at things and some form of "lateral-" or "out of the box-" thinking.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Davin on March 21, 2017, 07:13:22 AM
(http://i.imgur.com/ZKAN9K7.gif)
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on March 21, 2017, 07:42:14 AM
Looking at Six Sigma again, Arturo, looks like it should be applicable to all "systems", accounting, engineering, selling, servicing, even cooking and councelling!

As I said, more a way of observing and thinking - one more step in the history of people revamping old ideas to try to make money out of them. I still have a copy of Edward de Bono's "Lateral Thinking" from the late 60s. They say he invented "lateral thinking" but I would say that he merely attached a catchy name to something that people have done since we started thinking. There is often more than one way to look at things and not all solutions are logical at first sight - intuition, hunches, oddball mental associations etc. are very important.

My favourite word, "serendipity" - the fortuitous accident - has often also been beneficial. But you have to be able to spot the fortuosity, the serendipity, in the first place. Not just cuss 'cos you broke the damn thing again and chuck it in the bin!
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Arturo on March 21, 2017, 10:29:35 AM
Looking at Six Sigma again, Arturo, looks like it should be applicable to all "systems", accounting, engineering, selling, servicing, even cooking and councelling!
I didn't know that it would be useful in all those fields. I wonder if this is just a western practice then? They do things very differently in places like, say, Japan for instance.

Quote
As I said, more a way of observing and thinking - one more step in the history of people revamping old ideas to try to make money out of them. I still have a copy of Edward de Bono's "Lateral Thinking" from the late 60s. They say he invented "lateral thinking" but I would say that he merely attached a catchy name to something that people have done since we started thinking. There is often more than one way to look at things and not all solutions are logical at first sight - intuition, hunches, oddball mental associations etc. are very important.
Yeah being able to easily identify things helps your short term memory. So if you ever want to remember some process, give it a catchy name.


Quote
My favourite word, "serendipity" - the fortuitous accident - has often also been beneficial. But you have to be able to spot the fortuosity, the serendipity, in the first place. Not just cuss 'cos you broke the damn thing again and chuck it in the bin!
I see where you are going now. It helps to count the positives yes. That helps us out a whole lot in the long run. There is something I read about the subconscious mind that I think could be of use here. To be able to use your subconscious to make something happen, let's say, you tell yourself it it over and over for a few minutes and then stop and move on to breakfast or some shit. This puts it to your subconscious and you make things happen without much effort. So if you want to notice the serpendipity, tell yourself that you notice it like some Buddhist Monk trying to reach enlightenment.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on March 21, 2017, 10:42:06 AM
Hmm, I think thst a "frame of mind" is sometimes more important than any specialist knowledge. I am a technician at heart, like digging into the gubbins, but my "frame of mind" allows me to be flexible in many other areas. Like setting up a library and archive in an area, inland waterways, that I have never had experience of before.

It is often not only the nitty gritty, the specialist techniques, that are important, there are things that bridge disparate areas.

Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Arturo on March 21, 2017, 10:51:30 AM
Hmm, I think thst a "frame of mind" is sometimes more important than any specialist knowledge. I am a technician at heart, like digging into the gubbins, but my "frame of mind" allows me to be flexible in many other areas. Like setting up a library and archive in an area, inland waterways, that I have never had experience of before.

It is often not only the nitty gritty, the specialist techniques, that are important, there are things that bridge disparate areas.

I should look into that then. I feel everything I know is centered in it's own category.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: solidsquid on March 21, 2017, 04:02:19 PM
For a class I'm taking this semester.  Text is decent but quite basic, not a lot of detail.  Instructor is very disorganized.  No worries though, I'm switching programs in the fall anyhow.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51CdqT7C9-L._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

What exactly is this for? I read some of the wiki, just says it's techniques for process improvement. I assume it's for engineering?

It's a set of "tools" for process improvement of basically any process.  It makes use of various charts and diagrams along with some statistics to make processes less wasteful.  It's often paired with lean management techniques and you'll often see people refer to Lean Six Sigma and the two methods complement each other.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Father Bruno on March 22, 2017, 11:05:35 AM
For a class I'm taking this semester.  Text is decent but quite basic, not a lot of detail.  Instructor is very disorganized.  No worries though, I'm switching programs in the fall anyhow.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51CdqT7C9-L._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

What exactly is this for? I read some of the wiki, just says it's techniques for process improvement. I assume it's for engineering?

It's a set of "tools" for process improvement of basically any process.  It makes use of various charts and diagrams along with some statistics to make processes less wasteful.  It's often paired with lean management techniques and you'll often see people refer to Lean Six Sigma and the two methods complement each other.

I had to deal with this process often in my job as a manufacturing representative for the automotive field with regards to quality issues, not so much now because I only deal with wheels, but years ago when I was representing different types of DC motors it could be a pain in the ass (Seat and window motors).

It takes constant monitoring and adequate management systems...one of the  management systems that replaced the Total Quality Management (TQM) from the 80's.

I don't deal with it anymore, but I read an article recently I believe from Crain's Detroit Business that suggested process management can drag some organizations down and dampen innovation, so though you may improve efficiency you run the risk if the process management programs are misapplied to areas where you want employees to be innovative.

Maybe you'll get your black belt one day. 8)
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Icarus on March 22, 2017, 06:07:18 PM
Gloucester, I also have the book Lateral Thinking.  It is the stuff of competent and inventive engineering  states of mind. 

I am constantly puzzled by the tendency of ordinary humans to fix a problem with "Band aid" patches rather than exploring the root causes of whatever problem exists.

My US health care system is a case in point.  The cost of health care is prohibitive for all but the most wealthy. It has not always been that way. Why the hell don't we address the problem at its root, not with insurance programs that we can not afford and that is not within the financial capabilities of the poorer of us.

This is not to say that we should relegate physicians and others in the medical community to equivalent squalor.  We can make great modifications to the damned system if we examine the basic details and do something about the capricious (and greedy) billing absurdities. 
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on March 23, 2017, 03:24:01 AM
Gloucester, I also have the book Lateral Thinking.  It is the stuff of competent and inventive engineering  states of mind. 

I am constantly puzzled by the tendency of ordinary humans to fix a problem with "Band aid" patches rather than exploring the root causes of whatever problem exists.

My US health care system is a case in point.  The cost of health care is prohibitive for all but the most wealthy. It has not always been that way. Why the hell don't we address the problem at its root, not with insurance programs that we can not afford and that is not within the financial capabilities of the poorer of us.

This is not to say that we should relegate physicians and others in the medical community to equivalent squalor.  We can make great modifications to the damned system if we examine the basic details and do something about the capricious (and greedy) billing absurdities.
Yup, sometimes you have to strip it down to essentials, look at the purpose of every individual component, then reassemble it in a way that it works properly.

With regards to Obamacare: good idea overall but the idea of fining someone because they might be too poor to already have medical cover is just insane! As bad as, in the UK, fining, by denying benefits, those too ill or poor to make it to an interview, with a benefits officer, on time.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Recusant on March 23, 2017, 04:33:35 AM
With regards to Obamacare: good idea overall but the idea of fining someone because they might be too poor to already have medical cover is just insane! As bad as, in the UK, fining, by denying benefits, those too ill or poor to make it to an interview, with a benefits officer, on time.

Under the ACA (Obamacare) those who were too poor to buy health insurance were supposed to be able to sign up for Medicaid (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicaid). Because of various political hijinks that didn't always work, but the idea was that fines would be levied on people who could afford health insurance but refused to get it.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on March 23, 2017, 05:45:35 AM
With regards to Obamacare: good idea overall but the idea of fining someone because they might be too poor to already have medical cover is just insane! As bad as, in the UK, fining, by denying benefits, those too ill or poor to make it to an interview, with a benefits officer, on time.

Under the ACA (Obamacare) those who were too poor to buy health insurance were supposed to be able to sign up for Medicaid (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicaid). Because of various political hijinks that didn't always work, but the idea was that fines would be levied on people who could afford health insurance but refused to get it.

Ah. Still not sure that it is a good idea. If those with the means but not the inclination charge them the full cost of all medical aid tgey get, ecen in emergencies.  In the UK I am a fan of charging those who can afford to get drunk for the ambulance and "hotel charges" that the injuries gained through their drinking often need.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: solidsquid on March 23, 2017, 08:10:13 AM
For a class I'm taking this semester.  Text is decent but quite basic, not a lot of detail.  Instructor is very disorganized.  No worries though, I'm switching programs in the fall anyhow.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51CdqT7C9-L._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

What exactly is this for? I read some of the wiki, just says it's techniques for process improvement. I assume it's for engineering?

It's a set of "tools" for process improvement of basically any process.  It makes use of various charts and diagrams along with some statistics to make processes less wasteful.  It's often paired with lean management techniques and you'll often see people refer to Lean Six Sigma and the two methods complement each other.

I had to deal with this process often in my job as a manufacturing representative for the automotive field with regards to quality issues, not so much now because I only deal with wheels, but years ago when I was representing different types of DC motors it could be a pain in the ass (Seat and window motors).

It takes constant monitoring and adequate management systems...one of the  management systems that replaced the Total Quality Management (TQM) from the 80's.

I don't deal with it anymore, but I read an article recently I believe from Crain's Detroit Business that suggested process management can drag some organizations down and dampen innovation, so though you may improve efficiency you run the risk if the process management programs are misapplied to areas where you want employees to be innovative.

Maybe you'll get your black belt one day. 8)

A discussion point in my performance consulting course was essentially, "how much is too much?"  The point was that improvement projects can get out of hand and grow to become their own wasteful endeavors.  It becomes a balancing act to try and not waste money by trying to save money from being wasted.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on March 23, 2017, 08:46:12 AM
For a class I'm taking this semester.  Text is decent but quite basic, not a lot of detail.  Instructor is very disorganized.  No worries though, I'm switching programs in the fall anyhow.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51CdqT7C9-L._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

What exactly is this for? I read some of the wiki, just says it's techniques for process improvement. I assume it's for engineering?

It's a set of "tools" for process improvement of basically any process.  It makes use of various charts and diagrams along with some statistics to make processes less wasteful.  It's often paired with lean management techniques and you'll often see people refer to Lean Six Sigma and the two methods complement each other.

I had to deal with this process often in my job as a manufacturing representative for the automotive field with regards to quality issues, not so much now because I only deal with wheels, but years ago when I was representing different types of DC motors it could be a pain in the ass (Seat and window motors).

It takes constant monitoring and adequate management systems...one of the  management systems that replaced the Total Quality Management (TQM) from the 80's.

I don't deal with it anymore, but I read an article recently I believe from Crain's Detroit Business that suggested process management can drag some organizations down and dampen innovation, so though you may improve efficiency you run the risk if the process management programs are misapplied to areas where you want employees to be innovative.

Maybe you'll get your black belt one day. 8)

A discussion point in my performance consulting course was essentially, "how much is too much?"  The point was that improvement projects can get out of hand and grow to become their own wasteful endeavors.  It becomes a balancing act to try and not waste money by trying to save money from being wasted.
OK, I'll just stop gilding this lily then . . .
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: solidsquid on March 23, 2017, 09:04:51 AM
I had never heard that expression before, had to Google it...quite fitting once I knew what the heck you were talking about   ;D
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Guardian85 on May 22, 2017, 02:04:16 PM
Was in the specialty book store in Tromsø a few weeks ago, looking for something to read. But before getting to the stack of old "Conan the Barbarian" comics i happened past the shelf containing works of Terry Pratchett. I remembered hearing that his books were quite good from someone on this forum (I believe I was likened to a character at one point) and decided to give it a go.

Now, five books later I'm hooked!
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Tank on May 23, 2017, 11:02:14 AM
Was in the specialty book store in Tromsø a few weeks ago, looking for something to read. But before getting to the stack of old "Conan the Barbarian" comics i happened past the shelf containing works of Terry Pratchett. I remembered hearing that his books were quite good from someone on this forum (I believe I was likened to a character at one point) and decided to give it a go.

Now, five books later I'm hooked!
35 to go :)
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Icarus on June 24, 2017, 03:44:35 PM
Highly recommended for the politically observant types: Not a Scientist: How politicians mistake, misrepresent, and utterly mangle science.  By Dave Levitan   A non fiction book about that which the subtitle implies.  A most illustrative read of the chicanery, whether intentional or not, of our representatives and senators.   A most relevant book to digest and to then regret that our typical American, non reader, public, will never even get a sniff of the reality of political games playing.

I strongly suspect that the general descriptions within the texts will also fit the political scenarios of other nations.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Arturo on June 24, 2017, 06:21:52 PM
Highly recommended for the politically observant types: Not a Scientist: How politicians mistake, misrepresent, and utterly mangle science.  By Dave Levitan   A non fiction book about that which the subtitle implies.  A most illustrative read of the chicanery, whether intentional or not, of our representatives and senators.   A most relevant book to digest and to then regret that our typical American, non reader, public, will never even get a sniff of the reality of political games playing.

I strongly suspect that the general descriptions within the texts will also fit the political scenarios of other nations.

I'll pick that up
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Velma on June 24, 2017, 08:54:11 PM
At the moment, I'm only reading one book, Nemesis by Jo Nesbo. It is the forth in a series of Norwegian crime novels featuring the surly, reclusive Harry Hole. Friday I finished up The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde and Silence of the Grave by Arnaldur Indridason.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: BooksCatsEtc on June 24, 2017, 10:51:59 PM
I just finished "On the Move: a life" by Oliver Sacks.  Not my favorite of his books (enjoyed what he wrote about his work more than anything else), but I did like it. 

Halfway thru "The Simple Art of Murder" by Raymond Chandler.  Starts off with a short but every entertaining essay by the same name, and then a collection of short stories.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Tom62 on June 25, 2017, 04:04:13 AM
I'm reading Neal Asher's "The Technician" (2011), which is closely linked to "Dark Intelligence" (2015).

Quote
The Theocracy has been dead for twenty years, and the Polity rules on Masada – but it is an order that the rebels of the Tidy Squad cannot accept, and the iconic Jeremiah Tombs is top of their hitlist.

Tombs, meanwhile, has escaped his sanatorium. His insanity must be cured, because the near-mythical hooder, called ‘the Technician’, that attacked him all those years ago, did something to his mind even the AIs fail to understand. Tombs might possess information about the suicide of an entire alien race. It’s up to the war drone Amistad to discover this information, with the help of an ex-rebel Commander, the black AI Penny Royal and the amphidapt Chanter.

Meanwhile, in deep space, the mechanism the Atheter used to reduce themselves to animals stirs from slumber and begins to power-up its weapons . . .
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Icarus on June 28, 2017, 11:33:29 AM
Checked out a library book whose title looked interesting: Goldilocks and the Water Bears.... By Louisa Preston.
 This random selection turned out to be one of the most interesting and informative books that have cometo my attention in a long time.  Ms Preston is an Astrobiologist and planetary geologist at Birkbeck, University of London. She is a UK Space Agency Aurora Research fellow. Her research focuses on places on earth in which life is able to survive despite extreme conditions. Such habitats provide clues on what alien life forms might look like and where we should search for them.

The author brilliantly explains some complexities in such a way that they are easily understood. An example is her easy explanation of how the Periodic table is constructed. She gets into some super duper biological concepts and makes them seem both logical and simple enough to understand.

Ms Preston is quite taken with Water Bears, which are actually Tardigrades. It seems that the water bears are the most durable critters imaginable. They are able to survive in conditions that would spell destruction for most other life forms. They have survived laboratory exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 450 F to plus 300F. Durable little dudes one could say. Preston talks about Prokaryotes ans Eukaryotes and cyanobacteria and ediacaran fauna and plenty of other strange things without confusing the reader. She is very good at explanations of complex technologies.

The word Goldilocks, in the title, of course refers to other worlds where life forms are more nearly possible or even probable. Not too hot, not too cold, just right.  ISBN 978-1-4729-2009-6 also available as E-book. 978-1-4729-2008-9
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on June 28, 2017, 12:20:28 PM
Checked out a library book whose title looked interesting: Goldilocks and the Water Bears.... By Louisa Preston.
 This random selection turned out to be one of the most interesting and informative books that have cometo my attention in a long time.  Ms Preston is an Astrobiologist and planetary geologist at Birkbeck, University of London. She is a UK Space Agency Aurora Research fellow. Her research focuses on places on earth in which life is able to survive despite extreme conditions. Such habitats provide clues on what alien life forms might look like and where we should search for them.

The author brilliantly explains some complexities in such a way that they are easily understood. An example is her easy explanation of how the Periodic table is constructed. She gets into some super duper biological concepts and makes them seem both logical and simple enough to understand.

Ms Preston is quite taken with Water Bears, which are actually Tardigrades. It seems that the water bears are the most durable critters imaginable. They are able to survive in conditions that would spell destruction for most other life forms. They have survived laboratory exposure to temperatures ranging from minus 450 F to plus 300F. Durable little dudes one could say. Preston talks about Prokaryotes ans Eukaryotes and cyanobacteria and ediacaran fauna and plenty of other strange things without confusing the reader. She is very good at explanations of complex technologies.

The word Goldilocks, in the title, of course refers to other worlds where life forms are more nearly possible or even probable. Not too hot, not too cold, just right.  ISBN 978-1-4729-2009-6 also available as E-book. 978-1-4729-2008-9

But, as I am sure the lady mentioned the definition of "not too hot or too cold" has changed a bit. Goldilocks is a bit broader than she once was! Not sure if there has been any change in the need for liquid water, IIRC there are many bugs that hsppily live on ice, if slowly. Then there nematodes (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/06/110601-deepest-worm-earth-devil-science-animals-life/) that live literally miles (well, at least a couple) below Earth's surface in pretty harsh conditions. Plus bactetia even deeper.

Think I may look for that book, thanks, Icarus.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: BooksCatsEtc on June 28, 2017, 04:01:00 PM
Just started "Hillbilly Elegy" by JD Vance.  Enjoying it more than I thought I would -- I was half expecting a sulky, "me first" type rant to crop up every now and then but I'm in chp 4 and so far it's been entirely reasonable and self-aware.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: jumbojak on June 28, 2017, 07:26:58 PM
I'm reading Mad Dog Killers, a book written by a Congo Mercenary about his experiences there during the 60s. I'm only about 1/10th in but it seems interesting so far.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Essie Mae on June 29, 2017, 01:26:27 AM
Highly recommended for the politically observant types: Not a Scientist: How politicians mistake, misrepresent, and utterly mangle science.  By Dave Levitan   A non fiction book about that which the subtitle implies.  A most illustrative read of the chicanery, whether intentional or not, of our representatives and senators.   A most relevant book to digest and to then regret that our typical American, non reader, public, will never even get a sniff of the reality of political games playing.

I strongly suspect that the general descriptions within the texts will also fit the political scenarios of other nations.

I suspect you are right. You've so whetted my appetite that I'm going to get the book for myself. Presumably, government-appointed scientific advisors (where there are such appointments), either they don't have much clout or they become 'yes people'.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: xSilverPhinx on June 29, 2017, 02:42:43 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/91qqOzNSTqL.jpg)

The first of a four-part series. I'm liking it so far and recommended it to those who like historical fiction.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: OldGit on June 30, 2017, 03:34:44 AM
The Ancestor's Tale, by Richard Dawkins.  Fascinating.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: MariaEvri on July 02, 2017, 10:33:37 AM
at work Im reading the eaters of the dead by Michael chrichton
At home I'm reading "I am legend" by Richard Mattheson and "I Robot" by isaac Asimov
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: No one on July 02, 2017, 11:17:09 AM
The writing on the wall.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on July 02, 2017, 12:01:07 PM
The writing on the wall.
And what does it say?
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Tank on July 02, 2017, 12:17:19 PM
The writing on the wall.
And what does it say?

Bill stickers will be prosecuted.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Tom62 on July 02, 2017, 12:41:46 PM
I'm reading Harry Harrison's Bill, the Galactic Hero: The Final Incoherent Adventure (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/64434.Bill_the_Galactic_Hero),which is a good end to the series.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Gloucester on July 02, 2017, 12:45:40 PM
The writing on the wall.
And what does it say?

Bill stickers will be prosecuted.
Poor old Bill. Let's start a campaign, "Bill Stickers is innocent!" "Stand up for Bill Stickers!" "Today they came for Bill Stickers, the might come for you tomorrow!"
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Essie Mae on July 03, 2017, 12:28:03 AM
Five Days by Douglas Kennedy. A light read; bit like Bridges of Madison County. Only one third in and all I can say is that the writing is very straightforward and would especially appeal to those who love words.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Claireliontamer on July 03, 2017, 02:09:57 AM
Finally going to read 'A Man Called Ove', sorry I'm miles behind with the bookclub!
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Icarus on July 04, 2017, 03:49:48 PM
The writing on the wall.

Naughty for you to mention that book No One
 
The actual name of the book is Spots On The Wall. The author is a Chinese person named Hu Slung Cum


Will I be banished for such a breach of decorum as the above?
[/size]
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Velma on July 07, 2017, 08:35:33 PM
Just finished Imago, the third book in Octavia E. Butler's Xenogenesis trilogy. I'm reading Devil's Star by Jo Nesbo and Hounded by Kevin Hearne. Saturday, I plan on starting Hillbilly Elegy.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: BooksCatsEtc on July 08, 2017, 01:26:19 AM
Finally going to read 'A Man Called Ove', sorry I'm miles behind with the bookclub!

We don't care, jump in any time!
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: BooksCatsEtc on July 08, 2017, 01:30:36 AM
Have Purple Hibiscus, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie underway and enjoying it very much, tho I can tell the action is going to get hair-raising sooner or later.  The writing is excellent, and I'm not surprised Adichie won a fistful of prizes for it.

Also starting Astrophysics for People in a Hurry, by Neil DeGrasse Tyson.  Adapted from some of Tyson's essays in Natural History magazine.  Looking forward to seeing if I remember any of them.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Anne D. on July 08, 2017, 01:22:25 PM
I keep starting and stopping Tracy Borman’s Thomas Cromwell bio, which is really good. And I love a good mystery series and am on the second book in C. J. Sansom’s Matthew Shardlake series, set during Henry VIII’s reign. Shardlake is a lawyer who keeps being roped into investigative assignments from Cromwell.

I kind of fell in love with Hilary Mantel’s Cromwell. Even though I know he’s fictional, it’s still a disappointment to encounter other depictions of him that are at odds with hers.

I’m almost finished with Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus, by Laura Kipnis, a professor at Northwestern. It’s a quick read and pretty chilling. What prompted her to write the book was being the subject of a Title IX “hostile environment” complaint for having written an essay.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Father Bruno on July 09, 2017, 11:33:16 AM
Hi Anne D.  8)

Don't remember seeing you around here, but hello and welcome.  8)



I recently read a "A Drinking Life", which is a memoir by Pete Hamill, and also just finished "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet" by Jamie Ford.

Pete Hamill is a former New York Post columnist and editor as well as a journalist and novelist, and his book has been lauded as one of the best books detailing the life of highly functioning alcoholic. It's written in the hard, spare prose of a journalist, but what I loved most is it gives one an excellent view of what life was like growing up in New York during the Second world war.
I highly recommend this book, simply an excellent read. (Hamill was actually among the men who disarmed Sirhan Sirhan after he assassinated RFK and helped the police capture him while covering Robert Kennedy's run for the presidency)


I couldn't put down the "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet" by Jamie Ford. A love story that takes place during the second world war between a the son of Chinese immigrants, and a Japanese American girl.

Beautiful story taking place both in the present and past with an excellent background setting detailing the forced relocation of Japanese Americans during the war to internment camps.

The book is very popular, and the writer has said that he wrote it more as love story, and not so much to bring attention to the interment camps, but as this portion of American history is a subject not covered much by the media here in the US and considering the current administrations views on immigrants it may also become a cautionary tale to remind us not to repeat the same injustices again in this country.

In an interview I read the author has said the most frequent question about the book he receives is when will the movie come out, but he said Hollywood won't touch it because the main characters are not white, and they feel it would be a financial risk to come out with a movie with Chinese and Japanese leading characters. He said some independent film companies are interested, but since it is a period piece it would involve an large amount of capital investment to pull off the scenes taking place during the 40's. So for now sadly no movie.

Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: BooksCatsEtc on July 09, 2017, 11:50:27 AM

I couldn't put down the "Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet" by Jamie Ford. A love story that takes place during the second world war between a the son of Chinese immigrants, and a Japanese American girl.

Have added this to my "buy next" list.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: jumbojak on July 09, 2017, 12:09:17 PM
I'm about to start The Flechas, an account of the Portuguese recruited bushmen who served in Angola during the war there. It was a small group but supposedly a major contributor to Portuguese forces during the conflict, much like the Selous Scouts in Rhodesia or Koevoet in South Africa.
Title: Re: What Are You Reading?
Post by: Tom62 on July 09, 2017, 12:38:41 PM
I've just started to read Jan Timman's "Schakers" (Dutch for Chess players)

Quote from: from the back cover by Google translate
Over the course of his rich career, Grandmaster Jan Timman has played against many great chess players. Like no other, he can look on their hands and in their souls. Boris Spasski, Bobby Fischer and Garry Kasparov are three of the most important older schakers he portrays in this book, besides youngsters like Judit Polgar and Magnus Carlsen. Timman talks about the influence of Mikhail Botwinnik and Mischa Tal on him, both on and outside the board. He has an eye and understanding of the peculiarities of the chessmen, kind and ignorant, human and inhuman. Particularly intriguing is the portrait of Alexander Aljechin, who's trail Timman picks up during a stay in Lisbon, decades after his death; The story is at the same time enchanting and terrifying, as magic as precise.