Author Topic: HAF Book Club: Norse Mythology discussion  (Read 99 times)

BooksCatsEtc

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HAF Book Club: Norse Mythology discussion
« on: August 10, 2017, 03:39:31 PM »
Davin is nearly done, and I'm about 2/3s thru, so it seems like time.  The Norse myths were the ones I loved best as a child, but I can see in the years since my tolerance for gods has waned.
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"I think this is the prettiest world -- as long as you don't mind a little dying, how could there be a day in your whole life that doesn't have its splash of happiness?"  from The Kingfisher, by Mary Oliver

Davin

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Re: HAF Book Club: Norse Mythology discussion
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2017, 07:03:26 AM »
I finished it last night.

As far as the writing goes, I really like it. I was fond of Norse Mythology and Gaiman made the stories I remember make a bit more sense even though there is still some hand waving to ignore the parts that don't make sense.

The stories for me were partly enjoyable. I liked his version of the illusionist giant.

I never liked how the mythology "ended," I always thought that part was not part of the "real" story. In my mind, Ragnarok is still yet to happen. I also thought that the Christians had something to do with the "ending" where all the gods die.

I only mostly like Loki, I'd like him more if he wasn't such a dick. I always felt like everyone was too forgiving of him.

It was a fun read for me.

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Velma

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Re: HAF Book Club: Norse Mythology discussion
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2017, 12:26:53 AM »
I only mostly like Loki, I'd like him more if he wasn't such a dick. I always felt like everyone was too forgiving of him.
Loki is a trickster god. They tend to be smart and personable, so they are often forgiven for those times they act like a dick. I really don't think it is Loki's fault that the people around him didn't have enough sense to look skeptically at the advice Loki gave them. I was continually astounded that everyone pretty much said, "Oh, that sounds like a good plan" and ran with Loki's advice, even if they had been on the receiving end of tricks previously.
Life is but a momentary glimpse of the wonder of the astonishing universe, and it is sad to see so many dreaming it away on spiritual fantasy.~Carl Sagan

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Re: HAF Book Club: Norse Mythology discussion
« Reply #3 on: August 12, 2017, 02:04:25 PM »
I liked the little elves who made the hammer and the sword.

BooksCatsEtc

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Re: HAF Book Club: Norse Mythology discussion
« Reply #4 on: August 12, 2017, 02:33:17 PM »
I hate to admit it, esp. since the Norse myths were my favorites as a kid, but this re-telling never engaged me. I don't know whether to blame Gaiman for this (not a writer whose style I enjoy, and I found his slight modernization of the gods' behavior more off-putting than edgy) or myself (my ability to tolerate gods depicted as venal human assholes with super-powers has waned decidedly over the years). I think I'll split the difference and blame both of us equally.
Sandy

  
"I think this is the prettiest world -- as long as you don't mind a little dying, how could there be a day in your whole life that doesn't have its splash of happiness?"  from The Kingfisher, by Mary Oliver

Velma

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Re: HAF Book Club: Norse Mythology discussion
« Reply #5 on: August 12, 2017, 10:59:26 PM »
Although I enjoyed the book, I had a difficult time staying involved in the stories. I was astonished at the stupidity of the Norse gods. About the time I really got drawn into one of the stories, one of the gods would display the critical thinking skills of a teenager in a slasher flick, and follow Loki's advice without a second thought. Perhaps Gaiman was more influenced by the depiction of Loki, Thor, and Odin from the Marvel movies than he thought.
Life is but a momentary glimpse of the wonder of the astonishing universe, and it is sad to see so many dreaming it away on spiritual fantasy.~Carl Sagan

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Re: HAF Book Club: Norse Mythology discussion
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2017, 08:37:54 AM »
Although I enjoyed the book, I had a difficult time staying involved in the stories. I was astonished at the stupidity of the Norse gods. About the time I really got drawn into one of the stories, one of the gods would display the critical thinking skills of a teenager in a slasher flick, and follow Loki's advice without a second thought. Perhaps Gaiman was more influenced by the depiction of Loki, Thor, and Odin from the Marvel movies than he thought.

That was a stumbling block for me too -- I kept thinking, "Really?  You're going to follow Mr. My Schemes Always Backfire?  Again?"
Sandy

  
"I think this is the prettiest world -- as long as you don't mind a little dying, how could there be a day in your whole life that doesn't have its splash of happiness?"  from The Kingfisher, by Mary Oliver