Author Topic: Science GIFS  (Read 6416 times)

Dave

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #135 on: July 14, 2017, 08:47:56 AM »
This is where maths and me hit head to head!

I can see that it is possible to generate a formula that, taking the rotational frequency and the velocity of linear motion of the centre of a rotating disc, decribes the resultant wave form. But I have no idea of how to even start on it!

So i would turn to physical, mechanical means, making wheels etc, and then, possibly, deriving the math from measuring actual examples. Don't have the skills to write an algorithm either!

Later: looking for clues I found this

I want to do experinent 1C-05. That's my kind of science!
« Last Edit: July 14, 2017, 09:23:40 AM by Gloucester »
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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #136 on: July 14, 2017, 10:03:51 AM »
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


Dave

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #137 on: July 14, 2017, 10:26:59 AM »
Why are violent, even disasrous, scenes so fascinating? Lightening strikes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, eruptions . . . All hold our attention, fascination tinged, sometimes, with empathy, compassion, even a sort of vicarious horror, for any people involved.
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Claireliontamer

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #138 on: July 14, 2017, 10:56:14 AM »
Why are violent, even disasrous, scenes so fascinating? Lightening strikes, floods, tornadoes, earthquakes, eruptions . . . All hold our attention, fascination tinged, sometimes, with empathy, compassion, even a sort of vicarious horror, for any people involved.

I think it's quite safe for us on our mild little island where really the biggest risk is inland flooding.  I'm not sure I'd be quite so fascinated if I lived in the middle of tornado valley or at the foot of an active volcano!

hermes2015

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #139 on: July 14, 2017, 11:05:54 AM »
This is where maths and me hit head to head!

I can see that it is possible to generate a formula that, taking the rotational frequency and the velocity of linear motion of the centre of a rotating disc, decribes the resultant wave form. But I have no idea of how to even start on it!

So i would turn to physical, mechanical means, making wheels etc, and then, possibly, deriving the math from measuring actual examples. Don't have the skills to write an algorithm either!

Later: looking for clues I found this

I want to do experinent 1C-05. That's my kind of science!

Look at this page.

https://thatsmaths.com/2015/09/17/the-ubiquitous-cycloid/

If the light is outside the rim, it traces a prolate cycloid.

Are you familiar with shapes of constant width? They make it possible to have triangular or square wheels that give a smooth, non-bumpy ride. Wheels do not have to be circular!

Dave

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #140 on: July 14, 2017, 12:57:40 PM »
This is where maths and me hit head to head!

I can see that it is possible to generate a formula that, taking the rotational frequency and the velocity of linear motion of the centre of a rotating disc, decribes the resultant wave form. But I have no idea of how to even start on it!

So i would turn to physical, mechanical means, making wheels etc, and then, possibly, deriving the math from measuring actual examples. Don't have the skills to write an algorithm either!

Later: looking for clues I found this

I want to do experinent 1C-05. That's my kind of science!

Look at this page.

https://thatsmaths.com/2015/09/17/the-ubiquitous-cycloid/

If the light is outside the rim, it traces a prolate cycloid.

Are you familiar with shapes of constant width? They make it possible to have triangular or square wheels that give a smooth, non-bumpy ride. Wheels do not have to be circular!

The prolate cycloid, though I knew not its name, was how I envisioned the "outside the circumference" case.

Seen several vehicles on Youtube that had other than circular wheels.
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Icarus

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #142 on: July 14, 2017, 06:34:20 PM »
Thanks for the cool links Gloucester and Hermes. 

........And for the pix of the scary weather you other guys.

This is a fun place to spend an inordinate amount of time.

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #143 on: July 16, 2017, 09:51:56 PM »
This is where maths and me hit head to head!

I can see that it is possible to generate a formula that, taking the rotational frequency and the velocity of linear motion of the centre of a rotating disc, decribes the resultant wave form. But I have no idea of how to even start on it!

So i would turn to physical, mechanical means, making wheels etc, and then, possibly, deriving the math from measuring actual examples. Don't have the skills to write an algorithm either!


Is that a bit like what Gaudi did? To work out building stresses he hung loops of chains in the relative sizes of his planned  buildings and derived the formulae for his designs from that. At least, that's what ESs of little brain understood.
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Dave

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #144 on: July 16, 2017, 10:26:05 PM »
This is where maths and me hit head to head!

I can see that it is possible to generate a formula that, taking the rotational frequency and the velocity of linear motion of the centre of a rotating disc, decribes the resultant wave form. But I have no idea of how to even start on it!

So i would turn to physical, mechanical means, making wheels etc, and then, possibly, deriving the math from measuring actual examples. Don't have the skills to write an algorithm either!


Is that a bit like what Gaudi did? To work out building stresses he hung loops of chains in the relative sizes of his planned  buildings and derived the formulae for his designs from that. At least, that's what ESs of little brain understood.

Yup, the good old empirical method, suck it and see!

It seems that many first attempts at building big cathedrals in the early middle ages ended up as piles of rubble, expensive piles of rubble. But, for the greater glory of god they kept trying, and it seems they learned a few things.

Now I can look at a shape and envision most of the forces in it, whether it will stand up or not, only because hundreds or thousands of people have built things that last and I have seen them and understood them. Would take me forever to work out the actual forces and stresses at any one point though! Just don't have the maths - and no inclination to acquire them!

But some ifvthe computer dedigns are increrible, like a web where each member is designed exactly to take its planned stress (150% to 200% of expected working stress say). Often looks like more air thsn matter! The video below is nit the one I wanted to find, but it serves, in parts.


PS
An old boss, mechanical engineer, had the idea that to lighten a structure and save material you drilled holes in it until it fell apart. In your second prototype you missed out drilling that last hole.
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 10:38:06 PM by Gloucester »
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hermes2015

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #145 on: July 17, 2017, 05:50:06 AM »
Yes, Gaudi and others as well. I don't know how Buckminster Fuller got to his geodesic domes, but I expect it was a more mathematical approach based on the known rigidity of a triangle.

This again shows how much is out there to explore, especially with the addictive internet searches. As some of us have said, one lifetime is not enough. As a child I could never just look up something in a dictionary or encyclopaedia without getting sidetracked; often forgetting what I was trying to find at the outset.

That TED talk is very interesting, Gloucester. Thanks for the link.

A little seed for you: have you heard of the Yoshimoto cube? It is on my list of things to make.

Dave

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #146 on: July 17, 2017, 08:33:38 AM »
You and I are a good match at this level, Hermes! I also "branched off" in my early resesrches into things. Also had an esrly tendrncy to "connect" things together, look for links betwern ideas.

Think there dhould be a "chst thread" for this sort of thing!
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hermes2015

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #147 on: July 17, 2017, 09:51:56 AM »
I don't think I have revealed this before, but I have one great hero, Charles Eames. No, not a scientist, but an architect and designer. He is one of the famous people I would have liked to meet, but unfortunately, just before that was due to happen, he died unexpectedly in 1978. I have been collecting his furniture for many years. Anyway, this is one of his famous quotations about connections:

Eventually everything connects — people, ideas, objects...the quality of the connections is the key to quality per se...I don't believe in this 'gifted few' concept, just in people doing things they are really interested in doing. They have a way of getting good at whatever it is.

Dave

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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #148 on: July 17, 2017, 10:29:07 AM »
I don't think I have revealed this before, but I have one great hero, Charles Eames. No, not a scientist, but an architect and designer. He is one of the famous people I would have liked to meet, but unfortunately, just before that was due to happen, he died unexpectedly in 1978. I have been collecting his furniture for many years. Anyway, this is one of his famous quotations about connections:

Eventually everything connects — people, ideas, objects...the quality of the connections is the key to quality per se...I don't believe in this 'gifted few' concept, just in people doing things they are really interested in doing. They have a way of getting good at whatever it is.

I can only agree with Mr Eames!

Form and function are amongst the more important connections for me. The controls on that shower unit I bought, mirror smooth (apart from one ridge) are a case, for me their form did not connect to their function - to be used by soapy hands. Had I seen that unit set-up in a sales display, rather than a picture on a box, I would have spotted that problem. With the old shower fixed I now have nicely scalloped controls that I can grip easily. To hell with style, give me function every time!

On people, yes, my friend Jane has little knowledge of most forms on engineering, but has a very practical mind and an intuitive understanding as to why things stand up - she argues with builders to get her way and is usually right. It takes only a little encouragement to get her thinking branching out and her confidence building. At nearly 74 she still has more faculties than some younger prople - just never ask her to do maths beyond primary school level!

On things standing up, or not falling down, I can recommend J E Gordon's "Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down"

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Structures-Things-Dont-Fall-Down-ebook/dp/B002XHNNHU/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1500282962&sr=1-1&keywords=Why+things+fall+down

Paperbacks available from a fiver (used) to £100+

Buckminster-Fuller is one of my heroes, for his visionary perception. I have a "tensegrity" model on my toy shelf.
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Re: Science GIFS
« Reply #149 on: September 01, 2017, 12:25:21 AM »


A nanobot taking a spermatozoide to the egg.
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