Author Topic: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again  (Read 11439 times)

xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #105 on: November 07, 2017, 01:28:20 PM »
Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.

Yes, she is. I do too much for free already! :P

She could have learnt English but chose to learn French instead, so now she has to pay to have her papers and chapters translated... :P But for anyone in the sciences it's a bit of a no-brainer which language one should opt for.

Yes, despite the fact that French and German science has always been top notch English seems to have become a bit of a lingua frsnca - even before those Americans got their oar in! And despite the sizes of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and trade relationships. That is why I chose  the origins, borrowings, gifts, current dominance - and possible future - of English as my college research project.

In science it seems to be a recent thing, though. In Newton's day it was Latin that was the language of the sciences, which doesn't make too much sense if you ask me, being a dead language and all. Probably linked to the Church in some way, though by then science had already begun to free itself from the clutches of that institution. In the 19th century it was French's turn in the spotlight, possibly due to the enlightenment. When did English become so important in that scenario? :notsure: There was the Industrial Revolution, I don't know...
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Dave

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #106 on: November 07, 2017, 02:47:48 PM »
Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.

Yes, she is. I do too much for free already! :P

She could have learnt English but chose to learn French instead, so now she has to pay to have her papers and chapters translated... :P But for anyone in the sciences it's a bit of a no-brainer which language one should opt for.

Yes, despite the fact that French and German science has always been top notch English seems to have become a bit of a lingua frsnca - even before those Americans got their oar in! And despite the sizes of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and trade relationships. That is why I chose  the origins, borrowings, gifts, current dominance - and possible future - of English as my college research project.

In science it seems to be a recent thing, though. In Newton's day it was Latin that was the language of the sciences, which doesn't make too much sense if you ask me, being a dead language and all. Probably linked to the Church in some way, though by then science had already begun to free itself from the clutches of that institution. In the 19th century it was French's turn in the spotlight, possibly due to the enlightenment. When did English become so important in that scenario? :notsure: There was the Industrial Revolution, I don't know...

It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #107 on: November 07, 2017, 07:47:31 PM »
suspicious is better than suspect in this context
If religions were TV channels atheism is turning the TV off.
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #108 on: November 08, 2017, 11:48:52 PM »
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #109 on: November 08, 2017, 11:49:19 PM »
suspicious is better than suspect in this context

Tanks! :grin:
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #110 on: November 09, 2017, 12:58:22 AM »
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)

In days of yore a BBC bigwig said that the word "television", being a mixture of Greek and Latin, could not be tolerated and was bound to be changed.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.
Passed Monday 10th Dec 2018 age 74

xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #111 on: November 09, 2017, 04:15:46 PM »
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)

In days of yore a BBC bigwig said that the word "television", being a mixture of Greek and Latin, could not be tolerated and was bound to be changed.

 ::) Weird purists...
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #112 on: December 05, 2017, 10:43:58 PM »
Can I say "considerations raised in the revision of the paper" instead of considerations pointed out..."? I don't want to use 'pointed out' as it seems rather informal. Is it? :notsure:

It's for a response to the editor of a journal.
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #113 on: December 05, 2017, 10:58:14 PM »
I agree that "raised" is somewhat more elegant language, but I don't think that "pointed out" is notably informal. However, I'd phrase it "considerations raised in regard to the revision of the paper".
"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
— H. L. Mencken


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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #114 on: December 05, 2017, 11:03:42 PM »
I agree that "raised" is somewhat more elegant language, but I don't think that "pointed out" is notably informal. However, I'd phrase it "considerations raised in regard to the revision of the paper".

Thanks! :grin:
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #115 on: December 05, 2017, 11:10:28 PM »
 :boaterhat: Any time.
"Religion is fundamentally opposed to everything I hold in veneration — courage, clear thinking, honesty, fairness, and above all, love of the truth."
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #116 on: December 06, 2017, 02:44:46 PM »
You raised a good point!
I'm truly sorry, but I can't keep explaining this simple thing to you over and over again hoping that you'll finally understand something so simple and obvious.
I'm not the "Dumb-Ass Whisperer".

I really, really hate anti-semantics.

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #117 on: December 12, 2017, 01:26:11 AM »
Ok, so today as I was helping my mother close the school for the day and just after had closed the door after her students a woman, normal-looking but unfamiliar, rang the doorbell, cellphone in hand. My mother let her in, possibly thinking she was going to ask for information about classes and so on, but instead she held up her cellphone to our faces and asked us what her boyfriend could have meant by the following text message:

"Portuguese women knows (sic) how to pet a man."

:notsure: Pet a man? The thought of a dogman hybrid instantly came to mind (I'm more of a dog person). Maybe a werewolf? :chin:

Anyway, my question is, does that make sense? Can 'pet' be used for people?

The stranger said that her boyfriend was a native English speaker but his English was intermediate at best, riddled with grammatical errors. :nu-uh: Seems very strange to me. I gave the woman a look, and hopefully she understood.


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Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #118 on: December 12, 2017, 01:40:01 AM »
Not sure what it could have meant. Perhaps, he was using a voice to text, that just completely garbled what he said, then he sent it without realizing.

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Re: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #119 on: December 12, 2017, 01:42:01 AM »
Not sure what it could have meant. Perhaps, he was using a voice to text, that just completely garbled what he said, then he sent it without realizing.

Pat a man, perhaps? :lol:
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