Author Topic: Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again  (Read 2524 times)

xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #105 on: November 07, 2017, 01:28:20 PM »
Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.

Yes, she is. I do too much for free already! :P

She could have learnt English but chose to learn French instead, so now she has to pay to have her papers and chapters translated... :P But for anyone in the sciences it's a bit of a no-brainer which language one should opt for.

Yes, despite the fact that French and German science has always been top notch English seems to have become a bit of a lingua frsnca - even before those Americans got their oar in! And despite the sizes of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and trade relationships. That is why I chose  the origins, borrowings, gifts, current dominance - and possible future - of English as my college research project.

In science it seems to be a recent thing, though. In Newton's day it was Latin that was the language of the sciences, which doesn't make too much sense if you ask me, being a dead language and all. Probably linked to the Church in some way, though by then science had already begun to free itself from the clutches of that institution. In the 19th century it was French's turn in the spotlight, possibly due to the enlightenment. When did English become so important in that scenario? :notsure: There was the Industrial Revolution, I don't know...
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Dave

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #106 on: November 07, 2017, 02:47:48 PM »
Oh, is Auntie paying you for this work? That is a whole different kettle of fish! Translate on m'dear!

And don't forget to add it to your resumé.

Yes, she is. I do too much for free already! :P

She could have learnt English but chose to learn French instead, so now she has to pay to have her papers and chapters translated... :P But for anyone in the sciences it's a bit of a no-brainer which language one should opt for.

Yes, despite the fact that French and German science has always been top notch English seems to have become a bit of a lingua frsnca - even before those Americans got their oar in! And despite the sizes of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and trade relationships. That is why I chose  the origins, borrowings, gifts, current dominance - and possible future - of English as my college research project.

In science it seems to be a recent thing, though. In Newton's day it was Latin that was the language of the sciences, which doesn't make too much sense if you ask me, being a dead language and all. Probably linked to the Church in some way, though by then science had already begun to free itself from the clutches of that institution. In the 19th century it was French's turn in the spotlight, possibly due to the enlightenment. When did English become so important in that scenario? :notsure: There was the Industrial Revolution, I don't know...

It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.
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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #107 on: November 07, 2017, 07:47:31 PM »
suspicious is better than suspect in this context
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #108 on: November 08, 2017, 11:48:52 PM »
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #109 on: November 08, 2017, 11:49:19 PM »
suspicious is better than suspect in this context

Tanks! :grin:
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Dave

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #110 on: November 09, 2017, 12:58:22 AM »
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)

In days of yore a BBC bigwig said that the word "television", being a mixture of Greek and Latin, could not be tolerated and was bound to be changed.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

xSilverPhinx

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Re: I Need Help From All You Native Speakers Once Again
« Reply #111 on: November 09, 2017, 04:15:46 PM »
It was probably a combination of the Indistrial Revolution and the outrageously large British Empire, in proportion to its size. But before that was English's willingness (unlike the French) to absorb useful words from all over the world. That made it a bit polyglot and, sort of friendly. Someone said there are more books written in English than any other language because of its ability to say exactly the same thing in six different ways and still be grammatically correct!

As for Latin? Well, that was certainly the church's language until the likes Tyndale and Luther, and it became the intellectual lingua franca due to the fact it was a requirement for entry into universties and could be used with precision. Botany and medicine seem to be its main bastion these days. So I had a myocardial infarction instead of a heart attack and now suffer cardiomyopathy instead of something like "enlarged heart syndrome". "Heart failure" does sounds so bloody final!

Personally I would rather it had been Greek, a bit more fluid and melodic to my ear.

I know that in the biological sciences Latin still perseveres as a sort of lingua franca of species-naming, since the time of Linnaeus, but biology mixes a lot of Greek and Latin prefixes and suffixes to make up its jargon.

'Biology', for instance has its roots in Greek.  ;D Bio - 'life' and logos - 'study' (?)

In days of yore a BBC bigwig said that the word "television", being a mixture of Greek and Latin, could not be tolerated and was bound to be changed.

 ::) Weird purists...
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.