Author Topic: Mental Illness, Stigma and Ignorance  (Read 323 times)

No one

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Re: Mental Illness, Stigma and Ignorance
« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2018, 12:59:51 AM »
No one:
The average person gets depressed from time to time, they snap out of it. Sadly, they have no idea of the impact and devastation that accompanies chronic, debilitating depression. They think that people who suffer from it play the woe is me card. Not justifying their actions, it's just difficult for people to wear another's shoes unless they have walked that same mile.

Aregentium:
You do have a point, but it seems to me like a failure in empathy for those suffering from chronic depression. I don't know if it's a current trend, but now with all the information available and especially almost high exposure to depression and other mental illness-related topics in the media and such, could it be that people are becoming desensitized to it? Like, it's something so commonplace these days because people are talking about it more that it somehow downsizes the negative experience?

I hope I'm making sense...


Maybe not so much as desensitized as it is misunderstood. This can be said of any illness or injury where those that are unfamiliar with the crisis at hand. Unless you have a direct effect from said injury or illness or you know someone who suffers from, it is hard to quantify or fathom just what they are going through.

Let's face it, if a good portion of people who languish through this exhausting, depleting misery barley understand it themselves. How can anyone on the outside truly grasp the severity of it all? Most people with no experience area can not begin to comprehend the crushing weight, the consuming emptiness that devours one's will.

It is easy to sit on the sidelines and mercilessly judge, those that appear weak. And humans always choose the path of least resistance. The mock with the what do you have to be depressed about, as if life is some sort of comparison as to who has more right to wallow in their despair.   

It's all just a matter of understanding. If humans took more time to understand one another, the whole of their misfortune would melt away, and what a wonderful time it would be.

Magdalena

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Re: Mental Illness, Stigma and Ignorance
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2018, 04:39:34 AM »
...How can anyone on the outside truly grasp the severity of it all? Most people with no experience area can not begin to comprehend the crushing weight, the consuming emptiness that devours one's will.
...
This is deep.


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Ecurb Noselrub

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Re: Mental Illness, Stigma and Ignorance
« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2018, 05:13:02 PM »
No one:
The average person gets depressed from time to time, they snap out of it. Sadly, they have no idea of the impact and devastation that accompanies chronic, debilitating depression. They think that people who suffer from it play the woe is me card. Not justifying their actions, it's just difficult for people to wear another's shoes unless they have walked that same mile.

Aregentium:
You do have a point, but it seems to me like a failure in empathy for those suffering from chronic depression. I don't know if it's a current trend, but now with all the information available and especially almost high exposure to depression and other mental illness-related topics in the media and such, could it be that people are becoming desensitized to it? Like, it's something so commonplace these days because people are talking about it more that it somehow downsizes the negative experience?

I hope I'm making sense...


Maybe not so much as desensitized as it is misunderstood. This can be said of any illness or injury where those that are unfamiliar with the crisis at hand. Unless you have a direct effect from said injury or illness or you know someone who suffers from, it is hard to quantify or fathom just what they are going through.

Let's face it, if a good portion of people who languish through this exhausting, depleting misery barley understand it themselves. How can anyone on the outside truly grasp the severity of it all? Most people with no experience area can not begin to comprehend the crushing weight, the consuming emptiness that devours one's will.

It is easy to sit on the sidelines and mercilessly judge, those that appear weak. And humans always choose the path of least resistance. The mock with the what do you have to be depressed about, as if life is some sort of comparison as to who has more right to wallow in their despair.   

It's all just a matter of understanding. If humans took more time to understand one another, the whole of their misfortune would melt away, and what a wonderful time it would be.

Nice post.  Just my relatively brief experience with actual depression helps me empathize with those who suffer from it long-term or more intensely than I did.  I spent one night in jail as an 18 year-old - that was enough to convince me I never want to go back.  I spent a few weeks in depression - that was enough to know how horrible it could be if it didn't go away.

No one

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Re: Mental Illness, Stigma and Ignorance
« Reply #18 on: February 01, 2018, 09:48:24 PM »
Ecurb Noselrub:
I spent a few weeks in depression - that was enough to know how horrible it could be if it didn't go away.


And that's just it, it does not go away. Once you plummet to its depths, climbing out seems unimaginable. Unless one seeks help. Lamentably, many in this situation either feel they deserve to feel this way, or see asking for help as a sign of weakness. That is the stigma attached to depression.

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Re: Mental Illness, Stigma and Ignorance
« Reply #19 on: February 01, 2018, 10:02:01 PM »
When we get around t it we can discuss how little we know about PTSD.  What we do know is that it is a devastating condition that has its origin in being involved in, or witnessing some human horror.  If you were close to your platoon leader who stepped on an IED or Claymore mine that blew his legs off, saw the result of a bombing or rocket attack that killed innocent women and children.   Even the dismemberment of an enemy will leave an indelible impression that can not be dismissed or forgotten.

PTSD victims have tens of times more suicides than those of us who are merely sad or have simple anxieties. They are many times over more likely to destroy their families, become homeless, get hooked on drugs, or commit a murder.  Sadly we are not paying as much attention to that sad state of affairs as the sickness deserves.  It is much easier for us to pretend that that very real problem does not exist as seriously or as often as it does.  It does not touch us so we can ignore it or insist that the victim just get a grip and pull up his socks.

I have used the masculine case, but it is not exclusively a male problem. Women too have demons.