Author Topic: All things brain...  (Read 648 times)

xSilverPhinx

  • Non Dvcor
  • Global Moderator
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 11284
  • Gender: Female
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #15 on: July 30, 2017, 06:28:41 PM »
Well dammit Silver.  I am ambidextrous so I wanted to believe that Both sides of my brain were working in unison such that my brain was better than most.  Oh Well! Live and learn. :grrr:

:P

Have you always been ambidextrous or is it something you had to learn for some reason?
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


Icarus

  • The wise one.
  • Blessing Her Holy Hooves
  • *****
  • Posts: 4330
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #16 on: August 01, 2017, 05:10:35 PM »
Naah Silver, I was always confused that way. I could pick my nose with either forefinger and couds write with either hand (when I finally learned to write).  I found the ambi thing useful when doing things like painting or welding. I would start the motion with the left hand and continue by switching mid stroke to the right hand there to continue with equal control. 

Ambidextrous tendency was inconsistent., I would instinctively throw a ball with the right hand and catch the ball with the left hand in the most common manner.

Not to be insensitive but....When I had an industrial accident which removed the first joint of my right forefinger there was a problem that I had never contemplated. The finger ...what was left of it, was very sensitive and somewhat painful for years. I had phantom sensations that indicated some sense of feel in the tip of the damaged finger that was no longer there. During the lengthy recovery period I noticed...could not help but notice, that I had to modify my toilet habits so as to use the left hand which seemed most unnaturally clumsy.  I have been confused by all this but have not lost any sleep about the peculiar muscle memories....whatever that means.  I do know that say...classical guitarists do not have to think about which sting to pluck or which string or strings to fret.

The human body is a mysterious machine. It is encouraging to know that some really bright people, like Silver, are working on the key to all that anatomical and mental research into those mysteries.

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Has an Invisible Dragon in Their Garage
  • *****
  • Posts: 3497
  • Gender: Male
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2017, 12:10:18 AM »
^

When writing with the left hand did you tend to write "mirror" at first or to curl the hand - or was the curl learned?
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

xSilverPhinx

  • Non Dvcor
  • Global Moderator
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 11284
  • Gender: Female
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2017, 03:54:51 PM »
Naah Silver, I was always confused that way. I could pick my nose with either forefinger and couds write with either hand (when I finally learned to write).  I found the ambi thing useful when doing things like painting or welding. I would start the motion with the left hand and continue by switching mid stroke to the right hand there to continue with equal control. 

Ambidextrous tendency was inconsistent., I would instinctively throw a ball with the right hand and catch the ball with the left hand in the most common manner.

Not to be insensitive but....When I had an industrial accident which removed the first joint of my right forefinger there was a problem that I had never contemplated. The finger ...what was left of it, was very sensitive and somewhat painful for years. I had phantom sensations that indicated some sense of feel in the tip of the damaged finger that was no longer there. During the lengthy recovery period I noticed...could not help but notice, that I had to modify my toilet habits so as to use the left hand which seemed most unnaturally clumsy.  I have been confused by all this but have not lost any sleep about the peculiar muscle memories....whatever that means.  I do know that say...classical guitarists do not have to think about which sting to pluck or which string or strings to fret.

It's really cool that you're ambidextrous, Icarus. You're a rarity. :grin:

It's actually a good thing to change the way you do things just as it's a good thing to learn something new. The brain likes novelty, even if it's a bit awkward at first.

Quote
The human body is a mysterious machine. It is encouraging to know that some really bright people, like Silver, are working on the key to all that anatomical and mental research into those mysteries.

:blush: I'm not as bright as all that, but am helped by a lot of truly bright and really knowledgeable people in my endeavours. :smilenod:
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


Icarus

  • The wise one.
  • Blessing Her Holy Hooves
  • *****
  • Posts: 4330
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #19 on: August 02, 2017, 04:34:55 PM »
^

When writing with the left hand did you tend to write "mirror" at first or to curl the hand - or was the curl learned?

I am usually inclined to write with my left hand. Not only writing but graphics too...Mechanical drawing.... I am an oldie and I was an engineer and draftsman before Autocad, Turbocad, and such. No problem I can use either hand for the drafting pen...or pencil. That was an advantage when drawing a long horizontal line on a sheet of vellum. Switch hands on the way across the page. It did not seem to matter whether I started the line on the left or the right. Direction did not matter. Speed and line accuracy did.

Lefties use the "hook wrist" method to avoid smearing ink when their hand passes from left to right during the writing process. I never used the hook wrist method because I could hold my pens or pencils in such a way as to keep my fingers and heel of the hand below the previously written or drawn lines or text.

When I was in elementary school I frustrated my teachers when I used my left hand to draw or to write. They would sometimes rapp my knuckles with a ruler or other painful tool when I used my left hand.  I'd merely switch hands so as to avoid the ill informed punishment for daring to violate the christian inspired  norm.

I am conscious of the number of people who are predominantly left handed. Barrack Obama,  and some other notables. Obama is a "hook wrist" person.  I notice, perhaps not with statistical validity, that men are more likely than women to be lefties. On the other hand I am a fan of women's championship caliber softball.  Quite few of the premier female athletes in that sport, bat left handed and throw right handed. ....do you have any information...or curiosity... about that Fernanda?  By the way.... many female 115 - 135 pond third base and short stops can throw the damned ball toward first base at a velocity that I never could hope for. That is a whole other study.

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Has an Invisible Dragon in Their Garage
  • *****
  • Posts: 3497
  • Gender: Male
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #20 on: August 02, 2017, 11:56:42 PM »
^

Interesting.

A nephew, a pure left hander, was naturally a "mirror writer" - letters in correct order but back to front. He had to learn to curl his hand and sort of "flip his brsin" before others could easily understand. Perhaps this does not apply to ambis and is purely a brain thing.

I have heard, and read, that trying to force natural lefties to use their right hand can have severe psychological repercussions, especially on the personality.

I was told that the curled hand style was so the writer could see what they are actually writing but it makes more sense when considering the danger of smearing ink when writing or drawing. Er, wonder how the Hebrews and Arabs got over it. But, as you ssy, it is possible to write from below the line, providing "pushing" the pen(cil) does not make it dig in. I can remember the contorions required in many caligraphy styles to prevent that happening. Curable with a ball tipped nib if near constant line width OK.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

Arturo

  • Do Something Crazy!
  • Touched by His Noodly Appendage
  • *****
  • Posts: 2538
  • Gender: Male
  • Atheist, Humanist, and Champion
    • You two dig up, dig up dinosaurs?
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #21 on: August 03, 2017, 06:45:05 PM »
SHOCKING NEW ROLE FOUND FOR THE IMMUNE SYSTEM: CONTROLLING SOCIAL INTERACTIONS

Quote
The UVA researchers have shown that a specific immune molecule, interferon gamma, seems to be critical for social behavior and that a variety of creatures, such as flies, zebrafish, mice and rats, activate interferon gamma responses when they are social. Normally, this molecule is produced by the immune system in response to bacteria, viruses or parasites. Blocking the molecule in mice using genetic modification made regions of the brain hyperactive, causing the mice to become less social. Restoring the molecule restored the brain connectivity and behavior to normal. In a paper outlining their findings, the researchers note the immune molecule plays a “profound role in maintaining proper social function.”

https://news.virginia.edu/content/shocking-new-role-found-immune-system-controlling-social-interactions
But, uh...well there it is.
"Nothing's a struggle, but everything is a challenge"-Anon
Hate Is Weakness

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Has an Invisible Dragon in Their Garage
  • *****
  • Posts: 3497
  • Gender: Male
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #22 on: August 03, 2017, 10:40:18 PM »
SHOCKING NEW ROLE FOUND FOR THE IMMUNE SYSTEM: CONTROLLING SOCIAL INTERACTIONS

Quote
The UVA researchers have shown that a specific immune molecule, interferon gamma, seems to be critical for social behavior and that a variety of creatures, such as flies, zebrafish, mice and rats, activate interferon gamma responses when they are social. Normally, this molecule is produced by the immune system in response to bacteria, viruses or parasites. Blocking the molecule in mice using genetic modification made regions of the brain hyperactive, causing the mice to become less social. Restoring the molecule restored the brain connectivity and behavior to normal. In a paper outlining their findings, the researchers note the immune molecule plays a “profound role in maintaining proper social function.”

https://news.virginia.edu/content/shocking-new-role-found-immune-system-controlling-social-interactions

Have not read full article yet but an immediate thought came to mind: when we socialise, interact physically closely with others, we are at greater risk of acquiring disease - a cold, cough, 'flu, or worse if we get too close, and our systems have evolved to offer more immunity in such situations. Perhaps a sort of "synchronicity" also developed to regulate our behaviour in such circumstances.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

xSilverPhinx

  • Non Dvcor
  • Global Moderator
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 11284
  • Gender: Female
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #23 on: August 04, 2017, 06:22:36 AM »
Very interesting!

Have not read full article yet but an immediate thought came to mind: when we socialise, interact physically closely with others, we are at greater risk of acquiring disease - a cold, cough, 'flu, or worse if we get too close, and our systems have evolved to offer more immunity in such situations. Perhaps a sort of "synchronicity" also developed to regulate our behaviour in such circumstances.

:smilenod: It makes sense. From the article:

Quote
The follow-up finding is equally illuminating, shedding light on both the workings of the brain and on evolution itself. The relationship between people and pathogens, the researchers suggest, could have directly affected the development of our social behavior, allowing us to engage in the social interactions necessary for the survival of the species while developing ways for our immune systems to protect us from the diseases that accompany those interactions. Social behavior is, of course, in the interest of pathogens, as it allows them to spread.
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Has an Invisible Dragon in Their Garage
  • *****
  • Posts: 3497
  • Gender: Male
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #24 on: August 10, 2017, 12:31:17 PM »
Slightly bothered by the "evangelical" approach but, if this is as good as it looks it needs pushing.

[/youtube]

There is at least one other TED by Dr Amen - who runs his own clinic . . .

Other opinions seem to vary from SPECT scanning being an "underutilized tool" (lost link) to "Neurobollocks" for Amen's application.

Possibly similar caveats apply as with the case of the structure of psychpath's brains. But, we still need to look at, confirm and refine these tools.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

joeactor

  • That guy you know.
  • Global Moderator
  • Has an Invisible Dragon in Their Garage
  • *****
  • Posts: 3415
  • Gender: Male
  • Reading Invisible Ink Novels
    • Joe's Dump
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #25 on: August 11, 2017, 12:01:56 PM »
Fascinating, Gloucester. Thanks.

The plasticity of the brain is marvelous. Harnessing that in cases where it's damaged would be great if it can be studied further...

Arturo

  • Do Something Crazy!
  • Touched by His Noodly Appendage
  • *****
  • Posts: 2538
  • Gender: Male
  • Atheist, Humanist, and Champion
    • You two dig up, dig up dinosaurs?
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #26 on: August 17, 2017, 04:58:19 PM »
New findings on how brain neurons communicate with each other contradicting the old ideas.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170817131125.htm
But, uh...well there it is.
"Nothing's a struggle, but everything is a challenge"-Anon
Hate Is Weakness

Dave

  • Formerly known as Gloucester
  • Has an Invisible Dragon in Their Garage
  • *****
  • Posts: 3497
  • Gender: Male
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #27 on: August 17, 2017, 11:46:16 PM »
Good find, Arturo. Let's hope they can use this knowledge as therapy as soon as possible.
Tomorrow is precious, don't ruin it by fouling up today.

xSilverPhinx

  • Non Dvcor
  • Global Moderator
  • Guardian of Reason
  • *****
  • Posts: 11284
  • Gender: Female
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #28 on: August 18, 2017, 02:05:51 PM »
New findings on how brain neurons communicate with each other contradicting the old ideas.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/08/170817131125.htm

Very interesting!
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


hermes2015

  • A Frood Who Really Knows Where Their Towel Is
  • **
  • Posts: 476
  • Gender: Male
Re: All things brain...
« Reply #29 on: August 18, 2017, 09:53:30 PM »
This will definitely lead to improved therapy for certain conditions. Thanks for a good link.