Author Topic: Workshop and fixit stuff  (Read 919 times)

Arturo

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #30 on: July 23, 2017, 10:33:36 AM »
I always check to see where tools were made, especially anything that cuts, like router bits, drill bits, hacksaw blades, etc. I avoid anything made in China (and half the price) like the plague!

That's a good idea! I should tell my Dad that.
But, uh...well there it is.
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Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #31 on: July 23, 2017, 11:09:20 AM »
I always check to see where tools were made, especially anything that cuts, like router bits, drill bits, hacksaw blades, etc. I avoid anything made in China (and half the price) like the plague!

Understand that, though I have some Chinese stuff that has given good service, like a set of three 350mm masonery bits that I bought for £1 about 20 years, and much more than that holes through house walls, ago. The rotary tool, and all its sharp bits, is branded Von Haus which is registered in the US but must source its increfible range of ptiducts elsewhere - probsbly China. So we are down to the spec v price and quality control issues. I expect it not to be the quality of a Dremel (wonder if those are made in China as well these days?) but something sufficient for the fairly light use it will get with me. It got mostly good reviews with a few single stars that sound like quality control issues, overheating and flexible shaft failure. Not had either of those - so far.... One complained about variable speed but mine has a "soft start" function and as you complete the cut, and the load comes off, it quickly reduces speed. Looks like there is an electronic speed control that compensates for the load, by shoving in more amps or pulses, then quits when not needed.

As for the router base, according to all the ads it is a genuine Dremel accessory and mine is coming from Amazon. Will see what is on the packing and the part itself.
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hermes2015

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #32 on: July 23, 2017, 11:47:55 AM »
There probably are some manufacturers over there that have respectable quality control protocols in place, but I have had nothing but bad experiences with Chinese tools. These days I would rather pay more for something and know I have a better chance of not being disappointed with its performance.

Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #33 on: July 23, 2017, 12:43:55 PM »
There probably are some manufacturers over there that have respectable quality control protocols in place, but I have had nothing but bad experiences with Chinese tools. These days I would rather pay more for something and know I have a better chance of not being disappointed with its performance.

Problem is that branded stuff is not akways marked with the country of manufacture. If you find a reliable, well known, long history, brand you might still get Chinese made stuff. Yeah, avoid stuff from people like Sourcingmap or whoever if it is critical. Most cheap LEDs last no more than 10k hours when, for ten times the price, you csn get ones that last 50k hours! For something that will get to glow for maybe 5% of the time or less and then suffer suffer a design change, I settle for cheap. For the indicator for my friend's "always on" mower charger and her fish tank light I opted for the expensive ones.
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jumbojak

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #34 on: July 23, 2017, 08:09:11 PM »
I always check to see where tools were made, especially anything that cuts, like router bits, drill bits, hacksaw blades, etc. I avoid anything made in China (and half the price) like the plague!

It's hard to to find drills that aren't made in China anymore. China has become the twist drill capital of the world. You can still get Greenfield's Chicago Latrobe branded drills and Norsemen but those are mail order -and expensive - if you don't have the option of an industrial supply house like Grainger. Even if you have an account Grainger has been shutting down locations recently, so mail order or the hardware store variety is the only reasonable option. 

I will say that Chinese tooling has come leaps and bounds from where it was just a few years ago. There was a time that a drill or a wrench made in China was considered a joke. We got burned badly in an abrasive chop saw fifteen years ago but today, I wouldn't have second thoughts about buying one similar. The quality has improved that much. Heck, I recently watched a test of a Chinese mag drill that was about a quarter the cost of a Fein or Milwaukee. It was loud and ran a little hot but did just about everything you could ask of a mag drill short of line boring.
 

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Davin

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #35 on: July 24, 2017, 09:33:13 AM »
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

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hermes2015

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #36 on: July 24, 2017, 09:40:36 AM »
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

If it is a wooden door, it's not too difficult. Metal is more of a challenge.

jumbojak

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #37 on: July 24, 2017, 07:40:06 PM »
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.
 

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Arturo

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #38 on: July 24, 2017, 08:19:17 PM »
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.

Well the hinges have to be set correctly if they are not already not notched into the door. That would be the mist difficult part in my end because that kind of stuff is over my head completely.
But, uh...well there it is.
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hermes2015

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #39 on: July 24, 2017, 10:19:37 PM »
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.

And ear plugs for the children.

Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #40 on: July 24, 2017, 11:47:13 PM »
So I need to learn how to replace an exterior door. Been reading tutorials and watching videos. Looks like I'll need to get a few more tools.

What do you need besides a prybat, hammer and screw gun? Maybe a pair of scissors or utility knife and a nail set.

Eh?
Plus a chisel for setting in the hinges and (if mortice type) lock and plate, flat-bit or auger for setting in the lock itself, or hole saw for whst we call a "Yale' lock over here.

Assuming it is not a modern double glazed plastic/metal frame door!
« Last Edit: July 25, 2017, 12:04:01 AM by Gloucester »
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Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #41 on: July 25, 2017, 02:56:55 AM »
Well, another lesson learned: when a manufacturer claims his product is "compatible" with another that might mesn the other's cutting bits etc fit in it.

It does not mean the product fits the other's accessories... Like a plunge router base.

Let's see if I csn get a refund!

Later: yes I can.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2017, 03:31:05 AM by Gloucester »
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hermes2015

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #42 on: July 25, 2017, 03:06:43 AM »
I love DIY, but when it comes to certain projects, I would rather get the job done by professionals. An example is this glass door I had installed at the entrance into my apartment. It is quite big, so I was a bit nervous to try and do it myself. The opening that the door fits into is 2.7m high and 2m wide (the ceiling is 3.5m high).


That glass is 10mm thick, acid etched and toughened, and is a product called Matelux. It has a wonderful satin surface I like very much.

Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #43 on: July 25, 2017, 03:36:08 AM »
Wow! Some door! Impressive!

I can see why yiu were a mite afrit to tackle the job, must weigh a fair bit - going by the weight of my 10mm thick corner type computer desk top.
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hermes2015

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #44 on: July 25, 2017, 03:52:25 AM »
Yes, the pieces of glass were rather heavy. The two guys who came to install it were very efficient, though, and did the job in less than two hours. It would have taken me 2 days.