Author Topic: Workshop and fixit stuff  (Read 901 times)

Dave

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Workshop and fixit stuff
« on: July 10, 2017, 11:26:50 AM »
A place for seeking practical advice, offering tips and ideas or blowing one's own Mr or Ms Fixit trumpet!



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Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2017, 11:35:51 PM »
Moved ftom "Grumpy" topic.

Should be easy to take 1mm off as a flat. But dare I try to "turn" them down using a file and the drill in its horizontal stand, with wood either side to limit and level the cut? 0.5mm accuracy is all I really need, providing that gives a little slack rather than stopping the saw base fitting.

That really depends on the type of drill you have. If it's just a Jacobs taper like a drill press I wouldnt try it. The lateral forces on the chuck would knock it out rather quickly. Just about every homemade "milling" machine winds up the same way - with the chuck and endmill lying on the floor and the creator wondering what happened!

If there's a left hand threaded retention screw that acts almost like a drawbar though... might work. Runout would be pretty bad though and you might not wind up with a very round washer at the end.
Bog standard hand drill with a 43mm collar - as I said, no heavy kit and everything multi-purpose! The, "Bolt them together and file a flat" option is top of the option list at the moment.

Why, for some, is making the "tools" more of an attraction than making anything "non-tool" with them? I desperately need a folding stool in the workshop, should really make that first!
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 06:15:38 AM by Gloucester »
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Davin

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2017, 07:39:44 AM »
Two days ago, I replaced on ceiling light with a ceiling fan. The fuckers that installed the light fucked up the ceiling so I had to patch it first.

That same day I replaced two other ceiling fans and one of them, the house mounting was jury rigged and broken so that it worked with a bent ceiling fan mount, so I had to fix it before installing the new one.

Then last night, I replaced another with no problems.

I have one more to replace, and I'm worried about what I'll find when I remove the old one.

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Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2017, 08:25:56 AM »
Two days ago, I replaced on ceiling light with a ceiling fan. The fuckers that installed the light fucked up the ceiling so I had to patch it first.

That same day I replaced two other ceiling fans and one of them, the house mounting was jury rigged and broken so that it worked with a bent ceiling fan mount, so I had to fix it before installing the new one.

Then last night, I replaced another with no problems.

I have one more to replace, and I'm worried about what I'll find when I remove the old one.

In the UK we call bad workmen "cowboys", is it the same over there in the land of the Wild West? I had to beef up my mounting point when I installed my fan but only because of the change of weight. I like to be sure, I sit under it!

It's now illegal to DIY electrical work here unless you get it inspected by a "Part P" (part of the IEEE regs) qualified electrician - for a large fee. But no-one is going to notice changed or replaced wall lights, switches or outlets are they? Or even a changed ceiling fan, the certificate notes a fan is present and has been tested, but not the make or model . . .
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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2017, 08:34:04 AM »
In the UK we call bad workmen "cowboys", is it the same over there in the land of the Wild West?
We call them by their scientifically accurate, and universal Latin name - "Idiots"

Quote
It's now illegal to DIY electrical work here unless you get it inspected by a "Part P" (part of the IEEE regs) qualified electrician - for a large fee. But no-one is going to notice changed or replaced wall lights, switches or outlets are they?


Nope!
« Last Edit: July 11, 2017, 02:18:25 PM by Arturo »
But, uh...well there it is.
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Davin

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2017, 09:56:35 AM »
I don't think much is illegal, but there are a lot of things require permits and licensed contractors if you want to be able to sell or get full value.

Always question all authorities because the authority you don't question is the most dangerous... except me, never question me.

jumbojak

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2017, 01:57:24 PM »
Moved ftom "Grumpy" topic.

Should be easy to take 1mm off as a flat. But dare I try to "turn" them down using a file and the drill in its horizontal stand, with wood either side to limit and level the cut? 0.5mm accuracy is all I really need, providing that gives a little slack rather than stopping the saw base fitting.

That really depends on the type of drill you have. If it's just a Jacobs taper like a drill press I wouldnt try it. The lateral forces on the chuck would knock it out rather quickly. Just about every homemade "milling" machine winds up the same way - with the chuck and endmill lying on the floor and the creator wondering what happened!

If there's a left hand threaded retention screw that acts almost like a drawbar though... might work. Runout would be pretty bad though and you might not wind up with a very round washer at the end.
Bog standard hand drill with a 43mm collar - as I said, no heavy kit and everything multi-purpose! The, "Bolt them together and file a flat" option is top of the option list at the moment.

Why, for some, is making the "tools" more of an attraction than making anything "non-tool" with them? I desperately need a folding stool in the workshop, should really make that first!

Nah, just get you a mini mill/lathe combo. They don't take up much space and almost function correctly... in all seriousness, I think bench work with a file might be your best bet unless you just feel like trying it to see. I've been known to do that myself; it's how I discovered that a rasp functions a poorly AR a lathe tool, especially when your lathe is a hammer drill clamped in a vise.

As for making tools, I like to think of it as increasing my capabilities. You can only do so much with what you have so long as you let what you have limit what you can do. Currently in the hunt for old washing machine motors for various reasons. A carbide grinder and proper 2 by 72 belt grinder top the list.
 

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jumbojak

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2017, 02:00:31 PM »
I don't think much is illegal, but there are a lot of things require permits and licensed contractors if you want to be able to sell or get full value.

Doing the work isn't generally illegal so long as you follow code but there are plenty of people who do things for themselves that are very dangerous and illegal. Tying into old knob and tube electrical service is a great example. You can have knob and tube in your home, so long as you don't touch it. As soon as you add another outlet or switch though it should all be removed and replaced with modern wiring.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2017, 01:39:37 AM »
Jj said:
Quote
As for making tools, I like to think of it as increasing my capabilities.

Yeah, to make even more tools!

 :grin:
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Davin

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #9 on: July 12, 2017, 09:42:48 AM »
I don't think much is illegal, but there are a lot of things require permits and licensed contractors if you want to be able to sell or get full value.

Doing the work isn't generally illegal so long as you follow code but there are plenty of people who do things for themselves that are very dangerous and illegal. Tying into old knob and tube electrical service is a great example. You can have knob and tube in your home, so long as you don't touch it. As soon as you add another outlet or switch though it should all be removed and replaced with modern wiring.
Yeah, that's why I said not much is illegal, because some things are.

Always question all authorities because the authority you don't question is the most dangerous... except me, never question me.

Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2017, 05:08:24 AM »
I made a fundamental mistake but fudged it right!

After checking how big I could have my new worktop, and still get round it, I decided a standard 4ft x 4ft half sheet trimmed to 1m on one side woukd do. What I forgot to check was the diagonal of the hatch into the loft . . . It is 980mm!

But . . . I put a frame inside the original hole so that I could drop in a flush board from the top to stop me falling through the hole. Cutting 20mm off the corner joints of that frame, to leave a gap, gives me a diagonal of 1010mm. And no significant weakening of the frame.

Fit!
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jumbojak

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2017, 08:19:13 AM »


Here's a tool maker for you Gloucester. Personally, I think he should've lapped the first one and used that to file the rest. For the sake of authenticity...
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
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jumbojak

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #12 on: July 16, 2017, 08:23:30 AM »
As for my next project, it's going to be a shed door. The trick is I don't have a truck to bring large pieces of lumber in so I'm going to have to get creative. Dare I attempt a japanese scarf joint or do I just scab two by lumber together? The plan is for a torsion box frame with a thin skin glued on to give some rigidity. Maybe a few pieces on 1/4" plywood to keep the weight down so the door doesn't sag. I despise sagging barn doors.
 

"Amazing what chimney sweeping can teach us, no? Keep your fire hot and
your flue clean."  - Ecurb Noselrub
" Please hold your high school or college math books in higher esteem than
your copy of the KJV. " - Icarus

Dave

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #13 on: July 16, 2017, 08:45:26 AM »


Here's a tool maker for you Gloucester. Personally, I think he should've lapped the first one and used that to file the rest. For the sake of authenticity...

I have always marvelled at the skills shown by early engineers, before template-programmed cutting machines were developed. Would love to see the techniques John Harrison and his forebears and contemporaries used. I would never have that dedication nor patience but I have a lot of respect for them.

But, the intellectual leaps that made those machines possible put even those hand-skills into the shadows in terms of human acheivement.

I would have lapped a master reference surface as well, to kerp a check on consistency, plus various gauges to check angle quality. But a master tool maker will get a set right, they were hardly into mass production then.

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Re: Workshop and fixit stuff
« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2017, 09:18:14 AM »
Sooner or later we all have to go through the incandescent-to-LED lamp conversions at home. Well, there is another conversion road I've been walking the last few months. All my doors and wooden trim at home were originally painted with a white solvent-based polyurethane gel paint formulation. I decided to bite the bullet and repaint everything with the water-based polyurethane equivalent, since brushes and rollers are just washed in warm soapy water. I tested the paint first for durability and found it to be very tough and scratch resistant after a few days.

The process involves using fine sandpaper to key the old paint surfaces before applying one coat of an alkyd universal undercoat that gives a very nice matte finish. This gives a very good surface for the new paint. Then, when painting with the water-based paint, any splatters are just cleaned up with a wet cloth before it dries, and cleaning up is a dream. It means a bit of extra work now, but I think I will see a big benefit whenever I have to repaint.