Author Topic: Not science as such but . . .  (Read 928 times)

Dave

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Not science as such but . . .
« on: March 04, 2017, 10:20:59 AM »
Just in case you need to convert something in a sciencey article to something you might understand the Engineering Toolbox has useful tables and formulae.

Use this thread for anything you might think a useful adjunct to understanding science.
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hermes2015

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2017, 10:54:08 AM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2017, 12:07:24 PM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

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hermes2015

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2017, 12:59:06 PM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

You can think of electronegativity as a measure of how much an atom loves electrons, in other words, how strongly it attracts electrons. This can induce a dipole in a molecule that causes it to be polar, and this has a great effect on the properties of the molecule.

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2017, 02:08:22 PM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

You can think of electronegativity as a measure of how much an atom loves electrons, in other words, how strongly it attracts electrons. This can induce a dipole in a molecule that causes it to be polar, and this has a great effect on the properties of the molecule.
Read the Wiki entry - well, as far as the maths anyway! I presume that is a charge dipole rather than a magnetic one?
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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2017, 02:12:05 PM »
Excellent link Gloucester.
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hermes2015

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2017, 02:18:29 PM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

You can think of electronegativity as a measure of how much an atom loves electrons, in other words, how strongly it attracts electrons. This can induce a dipole in a molecule that causes it to be polar, and this has a great effect on the properties of the molecule.
Read the Wiki entry - well, as far as the maths anyway! I presume that is a charge dipole rather than a magnetic one?

You've got it. The electrons spend more time at one end of the molecule, causing a charge dipole.

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2017, 02:49:07 PM »
Cool...

If you have a WordPress site, there's a nifty converter plug-in called "Oppso":
https://tah.wordpress.org/plugins-wp/oppso-unit-converter/

You can even configure it to convert anything you'd like - I used it for Rubber Chickens (scroll down):
http://www.joesdump.com/2014/04/28/chicken-measuring/

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2017, 03:45:18 PM »
Thanks, Gloucester, that is really very useful. I could not help myself, I just had to test it by looking for electronegativities of elements. Sure enough, I found a table within one minute! I will give this link to my students.
Glad you liked it, Hermes! Thought it was worth bookmarking myself.

Didn't even know elements had electronegativities, so now I have something to look up myself!

You can think of electronegativity as a measure of how much an atom loves electrons, in other words, how strongly it attracts electrons. This can induce a dipole in a molecule that causes it to be polar, and this has a great effect on the properties of the molecule.
Read the Wiki entry - well, as far as the maths anyway! I presume that is a charge dipole rather than a magnetic one?

You've got it. The electrons spend more time at one end of the molecule, causing a charge dipole.

Can it be used for any analytical purposes?  Bit like NMR spectroscopy but different?
« Last Edit: March 04, 2017, 04:24:03 PM by Gloucester »
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hermes2015

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2017, 04:52:56 PM »
Yes, one analytical technique where we use different polarities is high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Separation of a mixture into its components can be achieved by fine tuning the polarities of eluting solvents and changing them over time as a gradient.

Dave

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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2017, 05:08:31 PM »
Yes, one analytical technique where we use different polarities is high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Separation of a mixture into its components can be achieved by fine tuning the polarities of eluting solvents and changing them over time as a gradient.

Ah, interesting. Need to look more at HPLC but got the idea - guessing it "smears" the various compounds into a sequence. Need to know wgat's in that shiny tube shown in the Wiki article.

Enough for the monent though, thanks Hermes.

Ah, found http://www.waters.com/waters/en_GB/How-Does-High-Performance-Liquid-Chromatography-Work%3F/nav.htm?cid=10049055&locale=en_GB
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Re: Not science as such but . . .
« Reply #12 on: January 20, 2018, 01:16:33 PM »
Article of possible interest to xSP  https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2018/01/18/578355877/repeated-head-hits-not-concussions-may-be-behind-a-type-of-chronic-brain-damage?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20180118&utm_campaign=breakingnews&utm_term=nprnews

That is interesting, in a morbid kind of way. People are more susceptible to such brain injury than previously thought.

Since we don't have any pain receptors in the brain we can't know there's something wrong (the brain doesn't feel its own pain) unless there are other symptoms to suggest it.

Quote
The researchers analyzed human brains — from teenagers and young adults who had been exposed to mild head impact but died from another cause soon after. They found early evidence of brain pathology consistent with what is seen in CTE, including abnormal accumulation of tau protein. CTE is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by that kind of abnormal accumulation around small blood vessels in the brain. The disease can cause brain cell death, cognitive deficits and dementia.

The accumulation of tau protein is also prevalent in Alzheimer's. I wonder how that and CTE differ. :notsure:

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