Author Topic: Political Turmoil in Brazil  (Read 3065 times)

Recusant

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Political Turmoil in Brazil
« on: March 19, 2016, 01:57:00 PM »
I don't know enough about the politics of Brazil, and though I've been doing some reading about the current demonstrations, I wonder what other people think, especially any who're closer to what's going on.  ;)

My main source of information on recent events has been the BBC, since where I am right now there's a BBC news channel available. Maybe I'm wrong, but there seems to be some bias in favor of the anti-government demonstrators in the BBC coverage. Here's a report on a pro-government demonstration: "Brazil crisis: Thousands join pro-Dilma Rousseff rallies" | BBC
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2016, 03:33:06 PM »
Anti-government bias is rampant in Brazilian major news sources, but then again they're controlled by few people with their own interests so that's to be expected.

It's a complicated situation, for sure. One major effect is the ugly partisan divide, with pro-workers' party and anti-coup supporters on one side and anti-government protesters on the other. The poor tend to be the former while the tax-paying middle class and rich tend to be the latter, citing pro-social government programs which lifted many out of ragtag poverty as one of the many reasons Brazil is currently in an economic recession. I don't know enough about economics to say, but I think that a larger middle class is one of the reasons why Brazil's economy held on for dear life for some time after the bubble burst in the USA.

I consider myself to be non-partisan. I don't support the Workers' Party but I also don't think that a democratically elected president should be made to resign, as the opposition and media are trying to force her to do by maneuvering the masses. Not that the Workers' Party also don't manipulate the mob. My fear is that the opposition will eventually succeed when the country becomes effectively ungovernable, and thus set a dangerous precedent. I also worry that if Dilma is ousted and Lula prevented from running in the next election, it would pave the way for alternatives are way worse than either of them.

The Judiciary. It is supposed to be independent but it is acting politically, which is worrisome. When federal judge Moro released phone recordings of  Lula's and Dilma's profanity-laden conversation in which she tells him that he will be minister (most likely to escape said judge as ministers can only be tried by the Supreme Court) there was an uproar and sparked further demonstrations. Why did Moro decide to release those recordings? We can only speculate. Was he bribed? Does he have second intentions? I don't know. Possibly. Many people think that he should run for president next.

There is an ongoing investigation involving Lula but nothing has actually been proven yet. Still, anti-government protesters are clamoring for his arrest. They're grasping at straws, citing one property that Lula denies is his (as he would if he had acquired it illegally...) but again, no proof has surfaced. Now they're looking into another property...anything to put the guy in jail. And that is another worrisome precedent they're setting if they arrest Lula based on hearsay and mob rule without any actual proof of wrongdoing.

While all this is happening, two senior officials who have been proven to have robbed millions in public money are free (Calheiros and Cunha), one of them leading a commission to impeach president Dilma. People, it seems, are so focused on killing the scapegoat that they have forgotten all about that. It's disgusting.

One thing that I think is a little weird (not really, not weird at all) is that the opposition are not calling for new elections. They haven't once done so. If the approval rate for the current government is as low as they claim (around 7%), then wouldn't they win by a landslide?

I think that it's a coup. We had a military coup in recent history but now what's happening is a new kind of process - a judicial coup.
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Recusant

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #2 on: March 20, 2016, 03:25:05 AM »
Thank you very much for that post, xSilverPhinx. I was intrigued to learn that Calheiros' and Cunha's hands aren't clean (though not surprised): that has not been mentioned in any of the reports I'd previously read. I'll be looking into that.  :)
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #3 on: March 20, 2016, 04:24:36 AM »
They're both long time politicians, with incredible power bases. It'll probably take years to remove them, if they're ever removed at all.

Renan Calheiros is president of the Senate and Eduardo Cunha is president of the Chamber of Deputies.  :puke:
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #4 on: March 25, 2016, 08:15:39 AM »


"So what's actually at stake in Brazil? maybe democracy itself."

 :(
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chimp3

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2016, 12:13:32 AM »
I can say this. My son is a guitarist in a punk rock band that tours world wide and with regularity. Last summer they received a street youth level phone call advising them to not appear at a music festival . This festival was targeted to be disrupted by angry young people. They did not appear and cancelled. The young folks were angry not at musicians but business men and politicians. Just saying.

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #6 on: March 26, 2016, 09:26:47 AM »
I can say this. My son is a guitarist in a punk rock band that tours world wide and with regularity. Last summer they received a street youth level phone call advising them to not appear at a music festival . This festival was targeted to be disrupted by angry young people. They did not appear and cancelled. The young folks were angry not at musicians but business men and politicians. Just saying.

In Brazil?  :scratch: Which city?
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chimp3

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2016, 02:05:04 AM »
Sao Paolo Summer of 2015.

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2016, 05:03:17 AM »
Sao Paolo Summer of 2015.

Looks more like something people in Rio de Janeiro would do. :P

(j/k)
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2016, 03:48:46 PM »
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2016, 04:45:34 PM »
Joke? No joke, it's for real.



How to explain this moment to a foreigner...:

"What's happening in Brazil?"
"They want to remove the president."
"Why?"
"They discovered a huge corruption case which fed a serious economic crisis..."
"And was she involved?"
"No, but they said that if she was competent it wouldn't have happened."
"And who do they want to put in her place?"
"A guy who was involved..." 

...

WARNING: Rant ahead!

And now the masses who were influenced by the media and our disgusting political class believe that if they remove the scapegoat from the presidency all of Brazil's economic problems will vanish. Such magical thinking.  ::) What's up with all this useless magical thinking?

When the vice president takes over they will wake up and reality will hit them in the face  -- hard.

Are people seriously that stupid stupid stupid stupid?! They really can't see that they're like sheep being taken to be fleeced by politicians who want impunity for their crimes?!

Why aren't the Vice and that bosta (pardon my portuguese) Cunha, the president of the Chamber of Deputies, both in jail?
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.


Ecurb Noselrub

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #11 on: April 17, 2016, 07:47:01 PM »
Sorry. What do you think the outcome will be?  I understand that if she is impeached she must resign for 180 days pending trial.  What will the fact nap result be, in your opinion?

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2016, 03:50:20 AM »
I don't know but I think that first and foremost, Brazil will not lift itself from its economic crisis so soon. How could it, when such things depend on so many external factors that are beyond anybody's control? Practically the whole world is in crisis yet we have more than a few knuckleheads who believe that removing the president (who started the hunt for corrupt politicians and business owners) will result in some genie coming out of its bottle and granting wishes. Sorry, but Temer (the vice president) is no genius. I don't even want to think of who he will be associating himself with too.

Secondly, I think the political class will start passing legislation to further protect themselves so they can continue to steal to their heart's content.

Thirdly, corruption will end now that Dilma's gone? LOL! Stupid people. Bleatin' sheep! It's all going underground again like it was before. The corrupt ringleaders of this coup have incredible power bases, and they're not going anywhere.

In the end few really care about Brazil's economic situation. People rarely see things as a whole and are really just looking out for number 1, and when salaries start coming late or not at all, when education and health services spiral further into decadence and when people become even unhappier with their current situation...it's too late. They got what they wanted.
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Ecurb Noselrub

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #13 on: April 18, 2016, 10:27:18 AM »
Not a good situation for Brazil heading into the Olympics.

xSilverPhinx

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Re: Political Turmoil in Brazil
« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2016, 03:11:34 PM »
I agree.
I'm just a student of the game that they taught me.