Author Topic: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread  (Read 861 times)

xSilverPhinx

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #15 on: September 21, 2017, 12:24:01 PM »
Sort of reprogramming a memory to get a better experience out of it.  Sort of.

Sort of.  ;) It would be a non-pharmacological intervention.

It's not anything...unnatural. Our memories are always reprogramming themselves with experience.
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Icarus

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #16 on: September 21, 2017, 04:47:09 PM »
Stay cool Fernanda. You have a bunch of cheerleaders at this place.  We believe in you.

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #17 on: September 21, 2017, 05:57:01 PM »
#BelieveInPhinx
But, uh...well there it is.
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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #18 on: September 21, 2017, 07:11:02 PM »
Sort of reprogramming a memory to get a better experience out of it.  Sort of.

Sort of.  ;) It would be a non-pharmacological intervention.

It's not anything...unnatural. Our memories are always reprogramming themselves with experience.

Yes, I've reinvented my personal history hundreds of times.

xSilverPhinx

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #19 on: September 22, 2017, 03:44:10 AM »
Stay cool Fernanda. You have a bunch of cheerleaders at this place.  We believe in you.

#BelieveInPhinx

Thanks. :grin:
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #20 on: September 22, 2017, 04:04:12 AM »
Sort of reprogramming a memory to get a better experience out of it.  Sort of.

Sort of.  ;) It would be a non-pharmacological intervention.

It's not anything...unnatural. Our memories are always reprogramming themselves with experience.

Yes, I've reinvented my personal history hundreds of times.

OK, let me qualify that statement. When you recall a memory, especially if it's recent and weak (does not have strong emotional valence associated with it) there is a window of approximately 6 to 10 hours in which a memory becomes labile and can suffer interference from pharmacological or behavioural interventions. These and other boundary conditions are frontier stuff.

Reconsolidation is a newly discovered process (demonstrated in 2000) , and still disputed by important people in the field, who for some reason seem to believe that consolidated memories are static.   ::)

Older memories which are not periodically reactivated become more generic with time as they are systems consolidated, that is, start to depend on cortical rather than subcortical (hippocampus) structures for their retrieval. How would you know just how much of your remote memories is accurate? Have you ever reminisced experiences in the distant past with someone and noticed that they remember something very different from yourself? For some reason they may have remembered different details, fabricated some (false memories), and forgotten others.   
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Dave

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #21 on: September 22, 2017, 04:33:18 AM »
Silver, I noticed that English was a requirement. I understand that English (and modified Latin for medical, biological etc terms) but do you have to learn all the jargon in English and Portuguese?

I am always aware (and slightly in awe) of your almost perfect, even idiomatic, English.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 04:46:22 AM by Dave »
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #22 on: September 22, 2017, 04:54:53 AM »
Dilver, I noticed that English was a requirement. I understand that English (and modified Latin for medical, biological etc terms) but do you have yo kesrn all the jargon in English and Portuguese?

They make it easy. The English test consists of translating a paragraph from a random neuroscience paper into Portuguese, so yes, I would have to know the jargon in both languages. We're allowed to bring a dictionary.

*glances at huge Webster's Dictionary collecting dust on the shelf*

Probably not as useful for this kind of test than for everyday life. :P 

Quote
I am always aware (and slightly in awe) of your almost perfect, even idiomatic, English.

:blush: Thank you Dave, I try hard to write correctly and not make a perfect fool of myself. :grin:

:secrets1: Ok, maybe I don't try as hard to not make a fool out of myself...

I have a request to make. If you see any errors please correct me. Feedback is important to the learning process! :smilenod:
« Last Edit: September 22, 2017, 05:07:49 AM by xSilverPhinx »
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #23 on: September 22, 2017, 05:03:26 AM »
Sometime this month or in the next they should be publicising the specific study points for candidates.  :studious:

I've looked at points for the selection process for previous years and saw that there are some that remain constant such as action potential and resting potential (it's a given), synaptic transmission (also a given), synaptic plasticity, neurotransmitter systems and...neuroanatomy.  :panic:     

I think I'll start with action potential and synaptic transmission as the two are linked. I'm thinking I should summarise the text book chapters, and then write a summary of that summary.

Flashcards might help but seems to me like they're made to get lost. I can't have gaps in my knowledge! :grin: 
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Ecurb Noselrub

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #24 on: September 22, 2017, 06:19:13 AM »

Reconsolidation is a newly discovered process (demonstrated in 2000) , and still disputed by important people in the field, who for some reason seem to believe that consolidated memories are static.   ::)

Older memories which are not periodically reactivated become more generic with time as they are systems consolidated, that is, start to depend on cortical rather than subcortical (hippocampus) structures for their retrieval. How would you know just how much of your remote memories is accurate? Have you ever reminisced experiences in the distant past with someone and noticed that they remember something very different from yourself? For some reason they may have remembered different details, fabricated some (false memories), and forgotten others.

I'm very aware of this process from a law suit I was involved in 25 years ago.  I represented a man whose 30-something year old daughter was accusing him of sexual abuse when she was a child.  It was a civil suit - she was trying to get money.  No criminal allegations were involved.  However, her memories of the events took on a fantastic nature (it would take me too long to describe it).  With the help of a psychologist and some guidance from Elizabeth Loftus, as well as some good ole' investigation, we convinced the jury that the daughter's allegations were based on false memories, which had been formed partially with the help of her own hypnotherapist.  The trial lasted two weeks and was on the front page of the local paper every day.  It was the biggest case of my career.   It got pretty nasty and emotional at times.  Also heartbreaking for the family.   

xSilverPhinx

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #25 on: September 22, 2017, 06:36:40 AM »
I'm very aware of this process from a law suit I was involved in 25 years ago.  I represented a man whose 30-something year old daughter was accusing him of sexual abuse when she was a child.  It was a civil suit - she was trying to get money.  No criminal allegations were involved.  However, her memories of the events took on a fantastic nature (it would take me too long to describe it).  With the help of a psychologist and some guidance from Elizabeth Loftus, as well as some good ole' investigation, we convinced the jury that the daughter's allegations were based on false memories, which had been formed partially with the help of her own hypnotherapist.  The trial lasted two weeks and was on the front page of the local paper every day.  It was the biggest case of my career.   It got pretty nasty and emotional at times.  Also heartbreaking for the family.

That's fascinating... in a morbid kind of way. :tellmemore: Some people it seems are naturally open to suggestion and things like hypnosis can have dire consequences. 

A lab colleague of mine is working on false memories, but with animal models. It would have been my project if she had not taken it first. :P Elizabeth Loftus is a prominent researcher in that field.  Here's one of her reviews (Traumatic Memories Are Not Necessarily Accurate Memories) in case anyone is interested.   
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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #26 on: September 22, 2017, 07:17:13 AM »
There was an episode of Statgate, season 9 I believe, where SG1 encountered a memory machine kinda like what you're talking about. It didn't end terribly well but it's nice to see science fiction turning to science fact. Just don't murder anybody and use your dark powers to cover it up...
 

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xSilverPhinx

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #27 on: September 22, 2017, 03:39:26 PM »
There was an episode of Statgate, season 9 I believe, where SG1 encountered a memory machine kinda like what you're talking about. It didn't end terribly well but it's nice to see science fiction turning to science fact. Just don't murder anybody and use your dark powers to cover it up...

Bwahahaha! :devil: I think we're still far from that.

...

:notsure:
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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #28 on: September 23, 2017, 05:44:06 AM »
I'm very aware of this process from a law suit I was involved in 25 years ago.  I represented a man whose 30-something year old daughter was accusing him of sexual abuse when she was a child.  It was a civil suit - she was trying to get money.  No criminal allegations were involved.  However, her memories of the events took on a fantastic nature (it would take me too long to describe it).  With the help of a psychologist and some guidance from Elizabeth Loftus, as well as some good ole' investigation, we convinced the jury that the daughter's allegations were based on false memories, which had been formed partially with the help of her own hypnotherapist.  The trial lasted two weeks and was on the front page of the local paper every day.  It was the biggest case of my career.   It got pretty nasty and emotional at times.  Also heartbreaking for the family.

That's fascinating... in a morbid kind of way. :tellmemore: Some people it seems are naturally open to suggestion and things like hypnosis can have dire consequences. 

A lab colleague of mine is working on false memories, but with animal models. It would have been my project if she had not taken it first. :P Elizabeth Loftus is a prominent researcher in that field.  Here's one of her reviews (Traumatic Memories Are Not Necessarily Accurate Memories) in case anyone is interested.

I had reams of documents about this person's false memories. That suit was a case study on the subject.  This lady got to the point where she was journaling every thought that came into her head, and was buying into the idea that those thoughts represented objective reality.  Her allegations went beyond bizarre. If she had stopped with a few memories of assault, maybe the jury would have believed her, but it got too incredible for the average person to believe.  In all of this she was validated by her therapist, hypnotist and psychiatrist.  She became a true believer in the reality of her own fantasies. It convinced me that the human brain can completely deceive itself and become incapable of discerning reality.

xSilverPhinx

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Re: xSilverPhinx's Journey Towards A Master's Thread
« Reply #29 on: September 23, 2017, 06:23:42 AM »
I'm very aware of this process from a law suit I was involved in 25 years ago.  I represented a man whose 30-something year old daughter was accusing him of sexual abuse when she was a child.  It was a civil suit - she was trying to get money.  No criminal allegations were involved.  However, her memories of the events took on a fantastic nature (it would take me too long to describe it).  With the help of a psychologist and some guidance from Elizabeth Loftus, as well as some good ole' investigation, we convinced the jury that the daughter's allegations were based on false memories, which had been formed partially with the help of her own hypnotherapist.  The trial lasted two weeks and was on the front page of the local paper every day.  It was the biggest case of my career.   It got pretty nasty and emotional at times.  Also heartbreaking for the family.

That's fascinating... in a morbid kind of way. :tellmemore: Some people it seems are naturally open to suggestion and things like hypnosis can have dire consequences. 

A lab colleague of mine is working on false memories, but with animal models. It would have been my project if she had not taken it first. :P Elizabeth Loftus is a prominent researcher in that field.  Here's one of her reviews (Traumatic Memories Are Not Necessarily Accurate Memories) in case anyone is interested.

I had reams of documents about this person's false memories. That suit was a case study on the subject.  This lady got to the point where she was journaling every thought that came into her head, and was buying into the idea that those thoughts represented objective reality.  Her allegations went beyond bizarre. If she had stopped with a few memories of assault, maybe the jury would have believed her, but it got too incredible for the average person to believe.  In all of this she was validated by her therapist, hypnotist and psychiatrist.  She became a true believer in the reality of her own fantasies. It convinced me that the human brain can completely deceive itself and become incapable of discerning reality.

I wonder just how much of this was the fault of the people validating her false memories and helping her create more, even if unintentional on their part. Social validation goes a long way in helping people believe weird things. I started a thread on the Mandela Effect a while ago, which has to do with socially validated false memories. It's just too easy to create a false memory under certain circumstances and for certain people. 

Hypnotherapy can be especially dangerous in that regard as it can make a person more open to suggestion. Just take a look at all the anecdotes of people who underwent hypnotherapy and started to believe they were recovering "repressed memories", things such as they were abducted by aliens for experimentation, for instance.

Don't get me started on "repressed memories".  ::)

I have people in my family whose brains seem to be particularly good at fabricating memories as they go along, and they are impervious to evidence that contradicts them. I've lost count of how many times such people have held grudges for no apparent reason, only to tell you later that you did so and so even though you didn't. ::)

I imagine that such a case as you mentioned must have put a lot of strain on relationships within that family, but the way I see it, if that woman sincerely believes in her fabricated reality than she is a victim more than anything.
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