Author Topic: "Spirirualisation"  (Read 432 times)

Dave

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"Spirirualisation"
« on: August 23, 2017, 09:10:03 AM »
In a BBC World Service prog they are talking about religion and the digitized world - some stuff on Bible apps and the effect of "unificstion" on the experience of Islam by younger people (but no mention of the darker radicalisation/evangelistic aspect).

One academic "reverend" was complaining about a sort of "de-Christing of christianity", a creeping "spiritualisation".  I thought that, to a degree, this is the other end of a line from the atheist "Sunday Assembly" movement. I see the latter as a sort of "pseudo/godless" religious movement, a search for connection, the common human need to be in groups.

Any variation of the word "spirit" usually invokes thoughrs of dieties and ghosts in tbe atheist mind, both anathema to rationality. But it can also be attached to a sort of collective human state. "The spirit of the times" really means something like "the aggregated human opinion". "The spirit of the body (of people)" ("esprit de corps") is similar but usually reserved for teams, regiments etc.

It seems to be part of the humsn survival toolkit. Should we be so afraid of using it? Are there other terms or phrases that we can use for "spirit" or "spiritual" that give the same sense of a united intent?
« Last Edit: August 23, 2017, 01:34:32 PM by Gloucester »
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Recusant

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Re: "Spirirualisation"
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2017, 01:28:36 PM »
People will always latch on to equivocation when it comes to things like this. I think that unless one were to coin a new term and try to get it into general use, that situation will always pertain.
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xSilverPhinx

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Re: "Spirirualisation"
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2017, 01:47:45 AM »
I think, at least in my experience, that a lot of the more traditionally religious people don't like the use of the label "spiritual but not religious" by people who believe in some divine power but don't follow a particular creed or church. Growing disillusionment with groups bound to religious institutions is one of the reasons people take to this view. Not only do some look outward to quench their spiritual thirst and feel united with something larger than themselves, but also look inward. 'Spirit' can refer to a collective feeling but it can also refer to individual essence, thus being present in all levels of society.

As an atheist I would much rather refer to my inner essence as 'spirit' over much more loaded words such as 'soul'. IMO the religious 'own' that.  ::)

It seems to be part of the humsn survival toolkit. Should we be so afraid of using it? Are there other terms or phrases that we can use for "spirit" or "spiritual" that give the same sense of a united intent?

Zeitgeist for instance. I can't think of any good ones...'psyche of the times' has an almost cacophonous ring to it. :P 'Milieu'?
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Arturo

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Re: "Spirirualisation"
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2017, 02:39:06 AM »
Collective conscious

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Re: "Spirirualisation"
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2017, 03:28:55 AM »
I see "it" as an energy. This energy flows through everything in existence. When the body hosting the energy becomes to frail to carry on, the energy is released and recycled.

Arturo

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Re: "Spirirualisation"
« Reply #5 on: August 24, 2017, 04:10:14 AM »
I see "it" as an energy. This energy flows through everything in existence. When the body hosting the energy becomes to frail to carry on, the energy is released and recycled.

Do you mean the force?

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Dave

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Re: "Spirirualisation"
« Reply #6 on: August 24, 2017, 07:44:49 AM »
I think, at least in my experience, that a lot of the more traditionally religious people don't like the use of the label "spiritual but not religious" by people who believe in some divine power but don't follow a particular creed or church. Growing disillusionment with groups bound to religious institutions is one of the reasons people take to this view. Not only do some look outward to quench their spiritual thirst and feel united with something larger than themselves, but also look inward. 'Spirit' can refer to a collective feeling but it can also refer to individual essence, thus being present in all levels of society.

As an atheist I would much rather refer to my inner essence as 'spirit' over much more loaded words such as 'soul'. IMO the religious 'own' that.  ::)

It seems to be part of the humsn survival toolkit. Should we be so afraid of using it? Are there other terms or phrases that we can use for "spirit" or "spiritual" that give the same sense of a united intent?

Zeitgeist for instance. I can't think of any good ones...'psyche of the times' has an almost cacophonous ring to it. :P 'Milieu'?

Your thoughts, mostly, parallel mine, Silver. English, at least, is riddled with words that have multiple meanings but have, mostly, been attached to one in people's minds. Like "discipline" usyally invokes thiughts of "punishment".

"Elan" is little used these days. Er, "zeitgeist" surely means "the spirit of the times" basically?

« Last Edit: August 24, 2017, 08:00:17 AM by Gloucester »
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